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Vintage Lighting need more detail on two lights

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by ship, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    So I finally got in two of my latest purchases - one took almost a month.

    Got a Strand #3480 8" Fresnel from 1989 that was missing lens and yoke. No big deal on the lens. On the other hand, Photometrics Handbook has a photo of the yoke shape and knob, but isn’t enough detail about the clutch break assembly in use. Strand Archive is useless for this fixture Can anyone provide a photo of this assembly? They / Leviton still make this fixture or similar ones to get parts? Otherwise I have fabricated clutch breaks before, just need a good photo to start with.

    Second photo I need is for a c.1950 #1365E Kliegl 6x16, in fairly good condition and it is a link between the c.1936-1950 #1165B and c.1978 #1355 both in stock now thanks to Derek’s lenses and some fabrication. This #1365E even came with a curious purple painted base and working T-14 bi-pin lamp I thought I would never see.
    Only one thing missing or confusing: At the top of the lamp cap is a 1/4-20 threaded tip to it which I think is like the center screw to an Altman #360 series like lamp cap lamp height adjustment/lock down. Seemingly there is by design either no way to raise or lower the lamp - other than by pivoting it with the short 3/4" bench focus screws, or this perhaps broken off knob or screw with the stud part remaining inside the cap was that adjustment.

    My question is what did this height adjustment knob or screw look like and how did it work? Single screw or a screw pushing a stuck post? Can anyone send me photos and details?

    Need a Circle K lamp cap for the above #1355 if anyone has an extra by the way.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    ship and (deleted member) like this.
  3. WooferHound

    WooferHound Active Member

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    I'm pretty sure that I can help you with the Klieg light. I don't remember specifically but I'm pretty sure that your broken screw was just to lock the cap onto the fixture and all adjustments to the lamp are done with 4 screws on the back of the cap. I am working in our Arena the next few days doing Disney on Ice and may not get to the Concert Hall till later in the week. I'll be sure to get a camera in there and get a coupla pictures for you.
  4. phenry

    phenry Active Member Premium Member

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    As a tech, I try to avoid sounding like a sales person, but we still have all those fresnel parts available. Email me and I can send you exploded views and part numbers.
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  5. church

    church Active Member

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    I have the 6 inch version of these fresnels in inventory and the mechanisim is the same. PM me if you want some photos and I will take some when the fixtures come back to the shop in two weeks.
    ship and (deleted member) like this.
  6. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Nope, fair enough in help given I didn't think I could get such parts and even tonight I set up jigs for routing such parts I think were used. Think I could make them but thinking getting the origional parts would be better.

    TBA yes! in thanks on them missing parts and still existing as a other than Levition company source for gear. Be with you in the morning. This much less, if a source for true Strand gear, I doubt anyone would object to your listing of your resource unless like as with my end user mostly source, it's best off line.

    Wow, like the photos and also like a source. Came up with a great solution for the problem in another way that would work, but proper parts are also good if not ofen better. Thanks.

    To both post the photos you have in question.
  7. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Thank for the offer on the Strand parts, but other than knobs... I got a bit ambitious this weekend and made my own parts out of some 1/8" and 1/2" thick sheet stock.

    Not perfect or how it was done but very similar. For the clutch cam, a hole saw, a router with die grinder bit, table sander and a lot of patience. Only thing I don't have is the handles, but I might have some spare at work. TBA further contact on the other hand for a resource and thanks.

    The 1/8" plate is something not seen above but is in further research shown. Not sure what was done in many ways to do a yoke grip, but what I did will work well given fiber washers between the plates. My yoke is also more of a squared off one in critiue. Fixture itself is complete though in taking the 75Q lens without a problem. Representational condition in noting the lack of accuracy of the yoke and clutch break assembly on it.


    Sorry to who ever want's the accuracy in all detail over essence in seeing it as an example... I paid for it and this money ain't going towards my retirement. Put huge amouts of work into making it function similar to how it would. End result is that it will probably function better than it did by design but looks similar. Plus I learned a new skill in using a jig and router with aluminum cutting die grinder bit for making the yoke clutch.

    Even on something from the late 80's I'm still learning from and gaining technique from.
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2010

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