These Ads will no longer appear once you have logged into ControlBooth.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

OMG I need help guys (and gals)... Gel selection.

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by aero, Dec 7, 2003.

  1. aero

    aero New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver WA
    8O

    Hi guys I am a complete NOOB and am in need of help desperatly. I am making a light plot for "Aristocrats" for a class and cannot find any info on gel selection. I am looking for a gel for late afternoon outdoor lighting (for backyard scenes) and for a lowlight indoor scene in front of a fireplace. Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

    PS> I am using GamColor filters. I have the complete swatch book.
  2. cruiser

    cruiser Member

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Melbourne
    For a late afternoon/sunset type of setting I would suggest using:
    324 Dark Bastard Amber (317 Airpocot Rosco) or
    375 Flame (18 Flame Rosco) or
    320 Peach (318 Mayan Sun Rosco) makes more of a warm accented afternoon wash or

    And for the fire effect:
    280 Fire Red (19 Fire Rosco). This is an intense red that is ideal for fire's, or you could try mixing in a bit of orange with the fire red to create depth.

    If you arn't sure which one you think would be best, try getting a small torch and putting the swatch about 2inchs from your hand and shine the torch through it. This will give a generally good idea of what the colour will look like, alternativly you can do it onto a white piece of paper!

    Hope this helps....
    (I work for Rosco now haha, if anyone wants gel info or conversion sheets let me know, id be more than happy to help out)
  3. Starlitr

    Starlitr New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    The specific colorings mentioned are good for the specials you may decide to employ, however you shouldn't be thinking about just that sort of color scheme first.

    You begin gel selection by considering the overall design concept of the show. If it is a musical comedy, think pink tones, if it is a straight play, think straw/lt amber tones. Use this scheme for your acting areas. Next you should have some basic warm washes and cool washes from various locations. Then you consider textures/gobos which might prove useful, such as leaves or breakups. Then you have to consider a backdrop if one is used, and decide on color/pattern choices. You will always have some "specials" which might be the reflection of fire from a fireplace, or TV, etc. Other specials might be to cover a specific area for a short period of time.


    I tend to stay with Roscolux.

    Acting areas- I gel one side either 06 or 34 (straw or pink) and leave the other side without color. That other side reads as cooler in relation, and by staying clear, you maintain the sparkle in actor's eyes, and highlights on their faces.

    Washes- I use 80 and 26 (blue and red) from the front and sides. Additionally, I like to have 99 (chocolate) from the sides and 23 or 25 too (amber).

    Backlights - These vary quite a bit, but lately I have been finding 65 useful (light steel blue), although sometimes I will use 02 or 06, and sometimes just clear.

    Gobos- Lots of realistic leaves. You can change the focus and just use them as breakups if you are short on $. Clouds on the cyc are nice of course, but usually overused-if you do clouds, use a few and keep them soft.

    My favorite backdrop is to keep a stardrop in place, and a white sharkstooth scrim/cyc in front. You can have a good day sky, and at night slight stardrop for stars.

    Additional instruments would add more color washes, perhaps a 27 and 83 for more saturated colors (better for surrealistic sequences or dance lighting--but that is a whole different design concept--don't even think of lighting dance like you light a play.)

    Just whatever you do--keep the followspot unplugged.

    Steve
  4. Radman

    Radman Active Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Franklin, TN
    Personally I prefer Rosco over Lee and Gam, they burn out too easily. I generally use 68 for backlight, blue backlight adds depth.

Share This Page