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3/32"=1'-0"

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Charc, Nov 24, 2007.

  1. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Yep, so my plan with doing my lightplot is to scan in the architectural drawings I have (done), and throw them into VW (done). I was going to guesstimate positions, until I got some more accurate measurements.

    The issue I've having now pertains to the scale. I'm in the scale selection area, and it doesn't look to me like I can input 1'0"=3/32". I'm not sure why *Blank* Consultants chose a 3/32" scale, but they did. I'm staring now at the "Paper Scale" section, as I feel like my answer must lie in that, but I'm not exactly sure how to proceed from there.

    Another question:

    The blackbox that is default in a new file is the "printable area" right? So my entire plot has to fit into that? What vexes me is that it is square, not 8.5"x11, or something with similar proportions.

    I'll continue to hunt through my tutorials for answers, but hopefully you guys can lend a hand.
     
  2. lightbyfire

    lightbyfire Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    First off, when you scanned the plans did they stay in scale? Just since I have had problems with the file not being true life to scale after scanning.

    anyway, in the scaling feature in VW you will find that the paper scale is the ratio of old scale to new. such that say 1" scale is 12"/1"=12.00000
    and 1/4" scale is 12"/0.25"=48.0000
    So therefore 12"/(3/32")=128.0000

    As far as the page setup, I don't know why it would come in square, do you have a printer connected to this computer? In either case, if you go to [File] [Page Setup] and set it to a normal 8.5/11 or whatever you need, and then, if it is still funny looking go to [Page] [Set Print Area] and try that.

    My only other thought is that you are refering to the grid, which i dont believe is what you mean and it is usually blue.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    yea, 3/32 is one of those numbers that does not have a real conversion. (10.66666666666666666666666666666-infinity, to the inch or whatever) Really have to wonder why they would use that scale to begin with!
     
  4. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    The page break lines in VW should be grey and thick. If you create a new spotlight document it will have a black border. You don't have to stay within the lines, you should draw whatever you need to, then adjust your scale to fit your output media. You can always make your drawing a PDF and take it to Kinkos and have it printed on large size papers.
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Post a picture, and we'll identify it within seconds. And then probably argue/debate about it!:)
     
  6. lightbyfire

    lightbyfire Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    I was just sitting here thinking, how good quality are the plans you have anyway? It might not be a bad idea for you to totally redraft the space, based on your own real measurments, essentially make your own as-builts, instead of relying on potentially inaccurate plans.

    also, great experience with VW drafting, its what I did a few years ago to get used to the spaces I'm in now. even drafted it up in 3D for the practice. this way you can do plan and elevation views when designing. helps everyone.

    just a thought.


    Also if you are looking for the 6" fresnalite, i couldnt find it either. But if you use an altman or some other fres it should be just fine. also you can revert to the USITT 1990 folder which has the standard stencils in it. FS3 is a 6" fres.
     
  7. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    You can also adjust the scale by typing in a new value, thus if the scale is "12"/0.25=48.000" you can alter it slightly by typing in 49.000 or 47.000, or whatever, to get it fairly close to 3/32 or whatever you need.

    I would also import the scanned-in image to a new layer "Arch Drawing" or some such and scale it appropriately in it's layer, then place all other objects in a separate layers(s) to the appropriate scale. Note that the scanned image is currently it's own object, so it's easy to cut and past it out of the current layer and into it's own.

    Steve B.
     
  8. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    (Last despairing gasp)

    All scales seem to work better in metric.

    (Runs and hides)
     
  9. soundman

    soundman Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Set the print area to what you want it to be, ARCH E it sounds like then print to pdf. That will save you the trouble of trying to get kinkos to read a vectorworks file. Check the PDF though as the line wieghts can get smudged in the transfer process. If you have a drafting prgram at your school they might have a ploter that you could use.
     
  10. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    I am going to go back a few posts and make some replies as now I am back from seeing the family for Thanksgiving.

    Drawing in VW, you are always drawing by feet and inches. No matter what scale you are in, a line is always however many feet and inches you tell it to be. Thus, if you change the scale, on paper the line changes length, but in scale it is the same. So, you can change a drawing from 1/4"=1' to 1/2"=1' and everything on paper will double in size, but when you take a scale rule to it, they will be the same length. That is the beauty of scale. You can globally change the scale in in the "Layers" dialog.

    This is probably a very good idea, or break out your trusty scale rule, or get one of those scale roller things and measure the drawing you have. Working with a drawing that has been scanned into VW is a PITA. Just check out this thread about it, that I started. Or, the lest you can do is copy the scanned document over and then get rid of the scanned image.

    Somewhere you were asking about layers. You should utilize them to the fullest, along with classes. I am just gong to give you an example based on how I work, and I am sure other have different ways to work. Layers allow you scale things, and they work very similar to layers in say Photoshop. You can put similar things in each layer and then arrange which layers are on top, and which are visible. I usually create a layer that is the theatre architecture, one layer that is lighting positions, one for lighting instruments, one for scenery, one for other linesets, one for the title block, and others as needed. Layers are really useful when you are making detail drawings of things (i.e. designer or TD details) as you can have multiple scales on one page.

    Then you have classes. Classes allow you to set default attributes for what you draw within a layer. Classes are very similar to layer ins AutoCAD. You can set a class line weight, color, fill, etc. Classes refer to how things look on a drawing. I will have a class for lighting instruments, lighting positions, I have a series of GP (ground plan) classes for architecture, lines (CL/PL, etc), basically anything that needs to look different gets its own class.

    As you add more to your drawing you will find that sheets are very helpful as well. Technically all a sheet is, is a group of active and non active classes and layers so that you can see what you want. I actually draw my groundplan and section on top of eachother. if you turned on all the layers and classes at the same time it would look like a mess. Sheets allow you to keep everything organized.
     
  11. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    For what its worth, 3/32" = 1' is one of the standard scales on an architect's scale (ruler). Why the designer chose that scale, I have no idea - perhaps it resulted in a size that just filled up or fit the original drawing size.

    If I did the math right, its 1 inch equals 128 inches*.


    Joe
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2007
  12. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Well, all I have to say about working with the scanned image is to make sure it is actually in the scale that you want it to be in when it gets into the computer. Check the measurements! After that enlarge it to a normal scale like 1/4"=1' or 1/2"=1'. You will be much happier in a normal scale that you can use a scale rule on when you print it.
     
  13. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    1inch = 128 inches surely.

    If 3/32 = 12 inches then 1 inch = 12/3 * 32 = 128 inches
     
  14. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Duh

    That'll teach me to check before posting...

    Joe
     
  15. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Actually the more I think about it that is a terrible scale. 1" = 10 feet 8 inches. I couldn't read that even with my glasses, I'd need a magnifying glass.
    You can put up to about 10 conventionals in 10 feet if you wanted to. Try drawing that in 1" even with Vector works.
     
  16. jwl868

    jwl868 Active Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Sight unseen, its hard to tell if its such a terrible scale, per se. Using that scale, a 200 feet x 300 feet building could be shown on a typical "D" size sheet.

    As far as I know, one can still purchase an architect's scale.



    Joe
     
  17. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    I sorta re-drafted the space, over the image. There are some issues wit the accuracy (I didn't care to be perfect). So some things don't make sense, but because my intention wasn't that someone would use this file to determine how much clearance they have X or Y, I'm happy with the finished file. I did include a note in my notes section though: "* All house and architectural details are +/-6" " That should give me plenty of clearance to cover my but!

    I did some other updating of the file in terms of layers, classes, and organization, and it is much better overall. I think it was time well spent, even if I have to drive 25 minutes to get to the Kinkos!
     
  18. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Re: 1'0"=3/32"

    Butt. That's okay to say, I suppose, but I prefer "posterior".

    I should have corrected the title of this thread earlier; not sure why I didn't. In the American Architectural world, the paper scale is always listed first, then the actual. So it's 3/32"=1'-0". 3/32" is a fine scale. It's half of 3/16" --the compromise between 1/8" and 1/4".

    Can anyone tell me why some designers spell out 'equals'?

    As I've said, in this electronic age, when you're never sure what's going to happen to your drawings, I feel it's better to put a map-like rule on the drawing rather than a specific scale, and/or the phrase "unless enlarged/reduced", how how vague is that, and how can one be sure?

    Rarely should a lighting person have to use a scale rule on a document, though of course it's a skill every tech should possess. Either all pertinent dimensions should be called out on their own layer, or the person making the truss tapes can just have the plot open in VectorWorks and measure as they make the tapes.

    Just my 2ยข.
     
  19. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Yep Derek, I think you'll like the new layout. I added a scale bar (or whatever it is called).
     
  20. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Awesome news:

    I was talking to the Maintenance Dept. Head today about the CFL business, and I asked if I could have access to the blueprints for the building. He said he can make me a copy of the CD with a digital copy of all the plates from the renovation.

    I'd love to be able to draft my space, accurately, in 3D, and use RenderWorks to explore the world of Pre-Vis.
     

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