3 Phase vs. 220 V for running revolve drive

Keith Duster

Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Location
Solon Iowa
Tech director for performing arts facility, helping out with high school production using a revolve. Rented 20' wood framed (very nice) 20' diameter revolve. Trying to resurrect a drive that a coworker and I fabricated 20 years ago. 3 phase, 1/2 HP 208-220V Dayton AC drive motor coupled with a Dayton speed reducer to a pneumatic rubber wheel. Newer facility that has a 120/208V 3 Phase 4 wire safety switch that has never been used - no fuses or feeder cable/distro plugs - installed on upstage wall. I am looking to install a Variable Frequency Drive so I can control direction, acceleration and speed. I have access to a 220V powered VFD that I could feed from a (very) remote panel, or I could purchase a new VFD to run from this safety switch. Any reason to choose one over the other? Basically wondering if there are any advantages to sticking with 3 phase input to VFD versus using the VFD to adapt from 220V to 3 phase power.
 

RonHebbard

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
Tech director for performing arts facility, helping out with high school production using a revolve. Rented 20' wood framed (very nice) 20' diameter revolve. Trying to resurrect a drive that a coworker and I fabricated 20 years ago. 3 phase, 1/2 HP 208-220V Dayton AC drive motor coupled with a Dayton speed reducer to a pneumatic rubber wheel. Newer facility that has a 120/208V 3 Phase 4 wire safety switch that has never been used - no fuses or feeder cable/distro plugs - installed on upstage wall. I am looking to install a Variable Frequency Drive so I can control direction, acceleration and speed. I have access to a 220V powered VFD that I could feed from a (very) remote panel, or I could purchase a new VFD to run from this safety switch. Any reason to choose one over the other? Basically wondering if there are any advantages to sticking with 3 phase input to VFD versus using the VFD to adapt from 220V to 3 phase power.
@Keith Duster Two initial thoughts:
1; Your VFD will permit FAR more useful operational features including: Accel, deccel, limiting of maximum speed, positional accuracy; the ability to rotate the shortest distance from where you are now to where you want to be. A revolve can NEVER be more than 180 degrees from where you want it unless you're stuck on taking the long way home.

2; Voltage and power losses over distance dependent upon the power consumed in tandem with the gauges and lengths of feeder cables you may, or MAY not have economically available to you.
(Whad'ya have VS. what can ya borrow Vs. How much can ya' afford? And that's my worst cheesy grammar.)
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

chausman

Chase
Premium Member
Fight Leukemia
Joined
Jul 11, 2010
Location
Spokane, WA
If you're driving a three phase motor on a single phase VFD, you'll need to derate the drive - generally by about half. Long feeds to the drive aren't necessarily bad, although you'll want to make sure you have a local service disconnect at the VFD if the (very) remote panel is more than 50' or or not line of site.
 
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