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Wireless 600MHz Incentive Auction Update (USA)

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by MNicolai, Jan 29, 2016.

  1. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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    My understanding is that the "type acceptance" of transmitters capable of tuning to now-licensed frequencies is revoked and those transmitters cannot be used under Part 74 or Part 15 (IOW, by us).

    We unlicensed users made as much noise as we could (with key technical assistance from Sennheiser, Lectrosonics, Shure and other manufacturers) but ultimately we were up against the big 3 cell phone providers, a handful of "rent-a-tower" operators, and the producer$ who create and $ell the content that will occupy this spectrum. I find it ironic that we all create large spectacular productions that seem to get reduced to a 5 inch screen...

    Part of the abruptness for our minority use of the spectrum is that both the reverse and forward auctions had to be concluded first; there were multiple iterations of the reverse auction. Once it was all done the FCC had to determine the order to reallocate TV stations in adjacent markets; the way the forward auction played out, the same bands were not sold in every market. Chess, anyone? At any rate it was that process that dictated when the auction winners could begin lighting up their new plunder and when we'd have to stop using their spectrum.
     
  2. CrazyTechie

    CrazyTechie Well-Known Member

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    I would be a little hesitant to operate in the gap unless you really need to have more microphones. The gaps exist as a means of preventing interference from the uplink and downlink sections of the band plan, which means there could be interference for you in that spectrum. The joys of part 15 dictate that you have to accept any and all of that interference. You also have to be careful that you don't cause any interference to other licensed users, as that is where you'll get into trouble with the FCC.

    There are other restrictions in that area as well such as lower max power output (20mW max) so keep that in mind. You may not get the same range out of those units as your other gear.

    It seems that the band plan has both licensed and unlicensed areas. 614-616 MHz and 657 to 663 MHz are setup to be unlicensed and 653 to 657 MHz require a license to operate in. It seems that to get a license, you have to use 50 wireless microphones or more routinely.

    As far as the AT mic that you are looking at--following the rules I've learned as an amateur radio operator--you can listen in any frequency all you want, but when you start transmitting you'd better make sure to do it right! Meaning, if you don't have a license, don't broadcast on frequencies that require a license. So as long as you don't use those frequencies, I'd wager you're fine.

    I've pieced this info together from the following links for your viewing pleasure:
    https://www.fcc.gov/general/wireless-microphones-0
    https://en-us.sennheiser.com/spectrum

    And, since I've now got my ham radio hat on,
    73
     
  3. manuallyfocused

    manuallyfocused Member

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    Does anyone know if the Sennheiser or Shure rebates would apply to non-working equipment? I can't find any mention on either website of whether the trade-in needs to be functional, just that it needs to operate in the 600 mhz range.
     
  4. JJBerman

    JJBerman Active Member

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    My earlier post mentioned a Shure webinar that if I remin the webinar Shure stated they will take all gear including nonfunctioning.

     
  5. AudJ

    AudJ Active Member

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    When I talked to a Sennheiser rep recently, I asked a question about voltage compatibility. He suggested plugging in one of the old units prior to sending it in for rebate. If it blew, then it wouldn’t matter, and we would know.

    Not saying this is their policy, but the guy I spoke to clearly didn’t care if the stuff worked.
     
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  6. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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    Newer info regarding the T-Mobile roll out of 600mHz cellular data services...

    http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,164023.msg1528316.html#msg1528316

    Henry Cohen of RadioActiv and CP Comms has updated his posts, the highlights are:

    1. Testing phase for new equipment will be on the order of a day, then full on service;
    2. Some major markets/metro areas will be lighting up as early as 2nd Quarter 2018;
    3. C & D freq blocks will probably go live before other blocks.

    Other auction winner activity is largely unknown and it is not likely they will notify others outside broadcasters.

    "Say hello to progress and goodbye to the 600mHz band" - with a nod to John Malcom Penn's "Moonlight Motor Inn"
     
  7. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    My understanding is that, if the mic can operate in the illegal range it is illegal to use.
     
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  8. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and the reason for that is the transmitter's "Type Acceptance" has been revoked.
     
  9. Silicon_Knight

    Silicon_Knight Active Member

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    This is also my understanding of the rulings. Of course, it seems like enforcement of usage like this (gear capable of illegal freq, but operating on legal freq) is likely to be very difficult - unless some investigator is already in a facility looking at the equipment for some other reason (e.g. an actual transmission violation).

    OTOH, selling gear with 600MHz transmission capability is also illegal, and would be much easier to enforce.
     
  10. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I haven't yet seen any mechanism in place for how they'll permit type acceptance conformance for existing systems.

    There is some space in 600 MHz for licensed and unlicensed use at restricted transmit levels. From my conversations with both Shure and Sennheiser it seems at least the big manufacturers are planning to push new firmware on their higher end product lines to restrict down to below 600MHz, but it's unclear how the FCC or the manufacturers will handle the licensed and unlicensed operating range within the duplex gap. If that feature is open to everyone, or if you have to buy a system that's specially band-limited to that duplex gap.

    I don't know if you'll have to register your serial number with the manufacturer to show that you've upgraded. Also don't know if that means you have to put new stickers on your transmitters to show their operating range is compliant.
     
  11. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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    My understanding, from Henry Cohen (formerly Production Radio, now of RadioActive Designs), is that only manufacturers can certify that the product imeets its Type Accepted. I don't see Shure or Sennheiser allowing end users to modify the transmitter (firmware, hardware, etc) as that act, by itself, revokes the type acceptance of an individual transmitter. And even if they did allow it I don't see how they could certify to the FCC that each and every modified transmitter does, in fact, meet the Type requirements without exception.
     
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  12. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Both Shure and Sennheiser lobbied the FCC hard to permit field modification, and the FCC approved that decision. Nobody may have implemented that upgrade path yet, but presumably they will be.

    From the ORDER ON RECONSIDERATION AND FURTHER NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING, dated June 22, 2017, which seems to answer my question as well about how stickers and FCC ID's will be corrected on the transmitters.

     
  13. Jay Ashworth

    Jay Ashworth Well-Known Member

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    So, translated, Mike, that means "if you have frequency agile mics that include both freqs which will be usable, and those which won't, and your manufacturer can ship you replacement firmware and you can install it, such that they can then only transmit in the freqs we're leaving you, you can do that legally"?
     
  14. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Eventually, yes.

    Won't be available for every product series, but the the higher $$ your units are, the better your chances of having that option.
     
  15. TimMc

    TimMc Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the update, and I should have checked with Henry before attributing - my conversation with him was prior to the FCC order you cite.
     
  16. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    Would be a simple matter of flashing the firmware on most units. I know the Sennheiser's have a data port to do that. (most) Still, I fear there is greater financial incentive to sell you a new system. Considering a G3 goes from about $600 to $1000 depending on features, and the only trade in offered was about $100, it kind of makes me sick to throw out perfectly good stuff.
    So far, I have not seen any promotion on providing software to make old 600Mhz units compliant. At this point, I don't have any left, but it would still be nice to see that option out there before the door slams shut.(Which for many of us has already happened.)
     
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  17. dicgleason

    dicgleason Member

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    When this happened before, Shure rebated all our wireless we turned in. Transmitters and receivers, but not the capsules on the transmitters. I have plenty of standby, extra capsules, SM58, Beta58, and 87C. (not for sale). I know at least one of the receivers did not work and no one asked about it. I was trading in 88 complete systems and replacing them with new so that might have been part of the reason. I was told the old units were headed overseas where the FCC doesn't have control.
     

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