The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Allen and Heath GL2200

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by hughesc, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. hughesc

    hughesc Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I was wondering if anyone knew of a way of making the aux faders control the levels of the TLR 1/4" aux outs. I found out that the aux faders by default control the XLR aux outs, but as most of our booth is wired for 1/4", being able to use the faders instead of the master dials would be helpful. Our mixer is a 24 channel Allen and Heath GL 2200.
     
  2. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

    Messages:
    1,432
    Likes Received:
    150
    Occupation:
    Radio Engineer
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    I think you're confusing the audio groups with the auxiliary outputs. While they may provide similar functionality, they do have different purposes and function slightly differently. Here's a quick rundown:

    An audio group is designed to group a number of different inputs together and provide a master control for just these inputs. An example of this would be the use of groups 1&2 for your wireless mic inputs. On your console (and on most consoles), a direct output from the group is provided via an XLR connector, and are controlled by a linear fader. Usually, you cannot adjust the amount of signal sent from a channel to a group.

    An auxiliary output is used to provide signal to effects processors, stage monitors (when monitors are mixed from FOH), and other devices which might need a mix (often very) different from that of the main mix. On many consoles (including the GL2200), aux outs are provided by a TRS connector and are controlled by a pot (knob) on the side of the console. You can control the amount of signal sent from a channel to an aux.

    For reference, a matrix is similar to an aux for master controls. A matrix usually derives its signal from the audio groups and the main mix, with a variable send from each of these busses.
     
  3. AVGuyAndy

    AVGuyAndy Active Member

    Messages:
    484
    Likes Received:
    6
    Solution
     
  4. Foxinabox10

    Foxinabox10 Active Member

    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Since the booth is wired for 1/4", you would want the FXLR to FTRS Barrel Adaptor that is on the site, not the FXLR to MTRS Barrel Adaptor, since cables are male to male of TRS, not male to female.
     
  5. AVGuyAndy

    AVGuyAndy Active Member

    Messages:
    484
    Likes Received:
    6
    He didn't specify exactly how his "booth is wired for 1/4." So, telling him he needs a male to female adaptor, may not be what he really need.s My post hinted towards the right idea, hoping that he would figure it out for himself.

    You need to get out more, I've seen plenty of male to female TRS and TS cables.
     
  6. jumpjet

    jumpjet Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    Actually, on the GL2200, i believe there are little blue switches that you need a pen or something to press down that switch control of the auxes to the group faders. Which is I think what you are asking for. Then just run the auxes out of groups 1-4.
     
  7. jumpjet

    jumpjet Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    Actually, on the GL2200, i believe there are little blue switches that you need a pen or something to press down that switch control of the auxes to the group faders. Which is I think what you are asking for. Then just run the auxes out of groups 1-4.
     
  8. Foxinabox10

    Foxinabox10 Active Member

    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    How often do you see a 1/4" male jack coming out of a sound board though? If it plugs into a sound board and it's TRS, it's a male connector on a cable.
     
  9. Andy_Leviss

    Andy_Leviss Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    NYC
    Not exactly. The GRP/Aux Reverse switches on the GL2200 swap the outputs and faders, not just the faders. In other words, pressing that switch would route audio sent to the Aux 1 bus from each channel to the fader labeled Group 1, and then to the XLR output labeled Group 1, while audio sent to the group 1 bus would go through the rotary pot labeled Aux 1 and it's associated TRS output.

    There's no way to switch the faders independently of the outputs jacks.
     
  10. jumpjet

    jumpjet Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    Yeah, but he has 1/4" outputs on the back of his board, and he is saying that a signal is not coming out of them when he uses faders. 1/4" should be group outs, if the GL2200 has them, if not, then the grp/aux switch should change the outputs to the group outs....

    ^^That was confusing and arbitrary since I don't totally understand his question.^^

    Let me rephrase:

    Hey! See if that button makes the board do what you want when you press it. If not, never mind, I don't understand your question.
     
  11. Andy_Leviss

    Andy_Leviss Active Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    NYC
    Well, part of the confusion is an indiscriminate interchanging of the terms aux where in some places he means group. To clear it up, let's eliminate those terms altogether.

    There are master dials on the output that are permanently linked to 1/4" TRS (there's no such thing as 1/4" TLR; TRS stands for Tip, Ring, Sleeve). There are also master faders that are permanently linked to XLR outputs.

    He asked if there's any way to make the faders control what comes out of the TRS outputs. The answer is no.

    You can switch what bus feeds the dials vs the faders with those little blue switches. Normally, the aux busses, which are controlled by the dials on each channel strip, feed the dials/TRS outputs, and the group busses, which are controlled by the group assign switches and the channel level fader for each channel, feed the faders/XLR outputs.

    Pressing the blue button for each pair of groups/auxes will switch these so that the aux busses feed the faders and XLR outputs, and the group busses feed the dials.

    The faders, however, are permanently linked to the XLR outputs, and the dials are permanently linked to the TRS outputs.

    If you're any good at making sense out of block diagrams, download the diagram for the 2200 from A&H's website. Near the center is a vertical dotted line with a black square in the middle of it, labeled "GROUP/AUX REVERSE". If you follow that dotted line, you'll see it pass through a pair of DPST switches (just look at the top half of the diagram, the mono channel, to keep things simple).

    It's clear on the diagram that these switches come before the output faders/dials, not after, so the switches don't affect the routing of those output controls to output jacks; those are hard-wired.

    No, this is incorrect. By default as shipped from the factory (ie, in typical FOH configuration), the TRS jacks are aux outs, and the XLR jacks are group outs. The group/aux reverse switch reverses these, BUT it reverses the controls feeding these outputs, too; the faders always stay with the XLRs, the pots with the TRSs. The only thing you can change is what feeds those pots/faders.

    --Andy
     
  12. jumpjet

    jumpjet Active Member

    Messages:
    133
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago Suburbs
    Ok, then I am thinking of a different A&H, with 1-4 aux outs being xlr, and 5-8 being trs.
     
  13. TassieBogan

    TassieBogan Member

    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tasmania
    The "little blue button" as you so eloquently put it, will swap the aux master knobs with the Group Master faders.

    make sure you keep in mind that it will also swap the outputs

    Allen and Heath ripped that one of someof my favorite midas desks. :p
     
  14. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    5
    Occupation:
    Automation Engineer
    Location:
    Mountain Home, AR
    right, at my church i actually work with this same board except at the 40 ch range. and sadly as to date i have been unable to find a way to get it to work any other way. i know that they have a quite detailed diagram of it that has some option of tweaking the way it works, but the only way that i've done is using a adapter from the xlr's to 1/4"
     
  15. blademaster

    blademaster Active Member

    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    5
    Occupation:
    Automation Engineer
    Location:
    Mountain Home, AR
    I would personally like to think that nothing is permanently one way or another
     
  16. jkowtko

    jkowtko Active Member

    Messages:
    806
    Likes Received:
    50
    Location:
    Redwood City, CA
    Can you tell me the weaknesses, or the weakest points, of the GL2200?

    I'm looking at a GL2200 or GL2400 upgrade from our Mackie boards, to give me more channels, more faders, more outputs, and hopefully less floor noise (the Mackie CFX is okay but the main outs are a bit noisy). I also won't mind the tone generator and aux/group switching, which I think will come in handy.

    Overall it seems like A&H has a pretty solid reputation for quality and versatile equipment. I can probably get a GL2200 in the close to $1k range, while a GL2400 will cost close to $2k, so I'd prefer to go with a GL2200 if there are no major drawbacks.

    The drawbacks of the GL2200 (vs the GL2400) that I know of are:

    - external power supply (GL2400 is internal up to 32 channels)
    - mono cannot be independetly assigned (GL2400 can patch off of aux6)
    - GL2200 does not have both TRX and XLR on aux & group outs (GL2400 does)
    - GL2200 has super-light touch faders (GL2400 has "normal" touch)

    and none of these would turn me away.

    Is there anything else important that I should know about the GL2200?

    Thanks. John
     
  17. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    5,948
    Likes Received:
    225
    Occupation:
    Stageline Operator/Staging Supervisor
    Location:
    Howell, NJ
    An external power supply is not a bad thing.
     
  18. fhs-tech

    fhs-tech Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    The 2200 has an OPTIONAL external power supply. I have one at the HS I work at and absolutely love the board. There is an internal power supply which makes set up a breeze. The light touch faders might be the only slight draw back due to the fact the faders move with the slightest accidental touch. Overall I love this board and would recommend it to anyone.
     
  19. Hughesie

    Hughesie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,170
    Likes Received:
    40
    Occupation:
    Freelance Lighting Programmer/grandMA Trainer
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    look i have worked a production with this desk solo and i think it's a great desk

    i can't really compare it to many desks but i can compare it with the bottem of the scale mackie 1604vlz
    and right up to a crest x8 desk.

    i would say that after using the desk for a little while with the internal power supply i found a slight amount of noise through some of the sources that i required more gain for, also i don't like running a power lead to the desk right next to some inputs, just something about xlr metal plugs and power doesn't seem quite right. the external power supply ONLY sends what the desk needs and doesn't send 240v to the desk then have 1/2 of it grounded. after saying this i can imagine why the in built power would be better because the external power supply was very heavy.

    also the fader movement, or ease of movement was annoying when i had the script resting on the desk and it slid down on the faders.

    summary from my perspective

    allen and heath, great brand name with great quality products and the 2200 was a great desk to work with and had no major drop backs

    except it had no noise generator but you could just use a cd or ipod playing a test tone or something, the crest i worked on had a noise generator and my view is, it either has one option (white noise) or it takes up too much space (white noise nob, where to assign it, pink, sine wave, adjust sine wave)
     
  20. museav

    museav CBMod CB Mods Departed Member

    Messages:
    4,017
    Likes Received:
    562
    Occupation:
    Acoustical, audio and audiovisual consultant
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    How about that the GL2200 is no longer in production?

    I definitely would not look at an external power supply as a negative, that's standard for large format consoles and in critical applications you find dual power supplies with auto switchover.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice