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Application/Resume Question

Discussion in 'Education and Career Development' started by cvanp, Dec 25, 2007.

  1. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

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    Hey all! I thought this would be the most appropriate place for this question but if not, move away!

    I recently put in a bunch of college applications and in a few of them, my Resume was inadvertently not included. There was a sheet on the forms that sort of filled that function (fill in your activities, etc.) so a resume was not required - I'm just wondering if it would be good to mail or fax the resume along separately, with a note or something.

    For what it's worth, I'm applying to Ithaca College, Le Moyne College, SUNY University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo State, and SUNY Fredonia for Theatrical Design. I'd like to branch out into more general theatre stuff too (I like directing and working with actors, but I don't act myself... I have stage fright!) so I'll try to do some of that too while in college.

    Thanks!

    Chris
     
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Don't sweat it Chris. Colleges don't really need or want your resume. As you said, they had forms to fulfill the same functions. Calling, writing, or faxing an addendum to your application will just make it look like you didn't follow directions, whether you did or not, and will probably piss off some secretary who has to then match up the new information with the original application. If the college needs more information from you, they'll ask for it, but it's highly unlikely. Class rank and SAT scores are what they look for, regardless of what they say. Then outside interests and activities.

    All the schools to which you've applied seem like good ones. I don't think I even knew what a resume was until 2nd or 3rd year of college.

    Good luck.
     
  3. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    When you come visit be sure to give me a ring, and lunch will be on me.
     
  4. bcfcst4

    bcfcst4 Member

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    Not all colleges place the most weight on scores and class rank... Some schools don't even require you to submit scores. It's not all propaganda when they say that colleges are moving towards a more holistic view of applicants.
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Not trying to start an argument with you, bcfcst4. Universities/colleges must turn a profit in order to achieve their higher goal of education. Well, that and have a winning football team.;) It makes little financial sense to admit a candidate who, based on high school achievements, is likely to drop out or be expelled due to poor academic performance before matriculation.

    Not talking about those ultra-liberal, hippie-type schools with the "no grade" policies and the like. As a high school senior, I briefly considered a College that had no curricula, all majors were independent study: "make your own major." My guidance counselor correctly advised that upon graduation, I would possess only the skills to be a scholar and go into academia. So I choose the University she, as well as my English, Math, and Theatre teachers, had attended. : )

    College professors/admittance officers, feel free to jump in here...
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2007
  6. bcfcst4

    bcfcst4 Member

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    I do understand that colleges are, to an extent, a business, and they must look out for those students most likely to be a waste of their money. What I was saying is not that they disreguard these numbers, because (most) do take them into account, but that they don't necessarily place the most weight on those. Many schools aren't just going to admit you if you have the numbers, you need the essays and recommendations too. And, conversely, just because you don't have the numbers doesn't mean they won't admit you. That's why they have median ranges for scores, because a portion of their applicants had lower numbers, but looked better through essays, recs, and interviews.
     
  7. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Also, having a professor who goes and talks to admissions in favor of you attending is a BIG, BIG plus.
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Point taken, bcfcst4. But to all the high-schoolers out there, don't misinterpret this thread as an excuse or justification for poor grades. That was more my intent than anything.
     
  9. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

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    I think I'm going to send the resume in... after a bit of thought I came to the conclusion that my application doesn't really reflect enough of me. I think the resume will help to show a bit more. I mean, my SAT scores are pretty darn good (if I say so myself) but my class rank isn't quite so hot... so I think sending along this resume will help them get a better idea of me. Perhaps.

    We'll see, anyway.

    Anyone care to proofread? :) Thank you all for your help and advice... it's greatly appreciated!

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2007
  10. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    I'm coming late to this party sorry... but would have to agree with Derek that the vast majority of the time your resume will be ignored if not thrown away. Most of the time it's about SAT and GPA and they check the boxes that show you've covered your basic community service. In many cases a state school isn't allowed by law to look at anything but SAT and GPA, plug those into a formula and give you a score which determines entrance.

    In general colleges don't like random material outside of the standard form. How can they accurately compare you to the person who doesn't send a resume? What if the next person submits a 40 page portfolio of work? People sue over not getting into the right college. They have to have a set fair standard that they follow for everyone. So often they have a set scoring rubric which a committee uses to grade you based on only the information in the standard application form.

    So, I wouldn't worry about it too much. If it's a really exclusive school they'll have an in person interview which is the really important part where you do have the opportunity to submit your resume. Other than that my feeling is it's better to do exactly as you are told and not annoy the person grading your application.
     
  11. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Along the same lines as what Gafftaper was saying, when/if applying to the Human Resources Dept. of a Las Vegas Hotel/Casino, they won't even accept a resume, as everything is done on computer, either from your home or at their facility. Of course, it is appropriate and expected to bring one's resume to the interview, although don't be surprised if the interviewer declines to keep it.

    That being said, cvanp's resume looks quite acceptable to me. No spelling/grammatical errors is a big plus in my book.:) +

    Thanks, gafftaper, for the new word:
    Main Entry:
    ru·bric
    Pronunciation:
    \ˈrü-brik, -ˌbrik\
    Function:
    noun
    Etymology:
    Middle English rubrike red ocher, heading in red letters of part of a book, from Anglo-French, from Latin rubrica, from rubr-, ruber red
    Date:
    14th century
    1 a: an authoritative rule; especially : a rule for conduct of a liturgical service b (1): name, title; specifically : the title of a statute (2): something under which a thing is classed : category <the sensations falling under the general rubric, “pressure” — F. A. Geldard> c: an explanatory or introductory commentary : gloss; specifically : an editorial interpolation
    2: a heading of a part of a book or manuscript done or underlined in a color (as red) different from the rest
    3: an established rule, tradition, or custom
    — rubric or ru·bri·cal \-bri-kəl\ adjective
    — ru·bri·cal·ly \-bri-k(ə-)lē\ adverb
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2007
  12. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Sorry occasionally I let me education show:oops:.

    Rubric is a word used a lot these days in the educational theory world (when I was getting my degree we referred to this as "edu-babble"). A real world example of a scoring rubric is Iron Chef America (I'm a Food Network junky). Chefs are graded by judges who give 1-10 points for taste, 1-5 points for Presentation, and 1-5 points for originality... that's a grading rubric. High Schools commonly use them for grading portfolios or Senior graduation projects. They are also commonly used in scoring artistic sporting events like gymnastics, ice skating, diving, even snowboarding. Any time you have something you need to grade or score but there is no right and wrong answer (or in the case of sports events where there is no clock or other team to out score by direct competition), rubrics are created. It breaks something that can't be easily quantified down into clearly definable components and gives points for those smaller areas. You've seen them your whole life you just didn't know that's what they are called.

    In the case of a college entrance application you might get 1-5 points for Class rank, School activities, community service, does your race/gender/finances help them reach their diversity targets for admissions, lots of ways they might grade you based on the information in their standard application.
     
    derekleffew likes this.
  13. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

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    Gafftaper, I think I'll take your advice and bring the resume just to the interview. Aside from being easier I think that's just the most appropriate thing to do in this situation.

    Thanks again everyone for your help and suggestions!
     
  14. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    For the interview I would do your best to make a killer portfolio. Page 1 or 2 being a resume followed by color pictures of your work. Something about 8-10 pages long. Take it all to Kinko's and have it professionally bound. Have several copies that you try to leave with the interview committee. I've had great luck with this strategy for job interviews. Really do it up nice. Show them how much you want to go to their school by the little details you put into it.

    You want to do the little things that make you stand out and be memorable above the others. So, be remembered as "the guy who had that custom bound book that showed his work".
     
  15. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

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    I do a lot of video work too, would I be smart to include DVDs in the portfolio even knowing that there is a 99.999999% chance that they will never look at them? I can put still captures from the video in the portfolio too.
     
  16. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    I would definitely do both. Think like this: The committee is going to interview many people all of whom are equally well qualified. What can you do to make yourself stand out at the end of the day? What can you leave them or attempt to leave them that will help them remember you as that student who worked extra hard on the process.

    When their day is done they will go through their stack of papers and say, "Ok, We have to pick 5 of these 10. Which shall we choose? Well let's look at the applications. John... hmmm didn't really make an impression on me. Mary... oh she was the one who was dressed SO professionally. Dave... That's the who had that really nice portfolio... etc..."

    So what can you do in the interview or leave for them at the interview that will help you stand out in their memory... IN A POSITIVE way. Also remember they may have rules that prohibit them from accepting anything you want to leave, but it's always worth a shot. If you can leave that portfolio/dvd on the desk for them, even if they don't look in it, they have a powerful physical reminder of who you are and how bad you want in... again this trick works well in Job interviews too.
     
    cvanp likes this.
  17. thorin81

    thorin81 Active Member

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    cvanp - I would be glad to proof read it. Just shoot me a copy and I will do a mark up on it.

    Cheers!!
     
  18. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Click on the yellow underlined word "proofread" in post #9 above.
     
  19. cvanp

    cvanp Active Member

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    Hey all, thanks so much for your help. You guys are great!

    One final question... I am going to try to schedule my Ithaca interview for the latest interview date (March 23). My reasoning is that by then, I'll have all the sets that I have designed for Guys And Dolls already built, and I will have pictures from the light design to stick in my portfolio.

    I don't see an issue with this however I do think there might be a small possibility they would look badly on the fact that I'm waiting to the last minute. Is this just paranoia or would it be a real possibility?

    Thanks again.
     
  20. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    For admission in fall 2008?
    That seems to be cutting it close.
     

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