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Conventional Fixtures Best Seat, lamp insertion tool

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by derekleffew, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I recently received one of these: Best Seat Lamp Insertion Tool, for HPL Lamps. Does anyone else use one?

    Some thoughts:
    It performs as intended, but it's one of those things that I'm sure will be nowhere near me when I need it, and my shirt-tail is always close by.:)

    It's larger than I expected: 1 3/8" in diameter and 3" long.

    I can see its usefulness particularly with new sockets, as those can be a bear in which to seat the HPL lamp properly/fully.

    I wish it also worked with the FEL/GLA family of lamps.

    [​IMG]

    Does anyone else have any thoughts he/she would like to share?
     
  2. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    I keep 2 in the theater and like them. One is in the drawer with the emergency supply of lamps, the other is in the laptop bag that the crew takes out to FOH with color and radios.

    And you're right that I wished they made one for GLC/FEL type lamp and had a converstion with Production Advantage (where I got mine) about this. They too would like to have marketed a model for GLC/FEL but found no good solution.

    SB
     
  3. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    My new S-4 fixture lamp insertion tool was a 12" piece of 1" Sch. 40 pipe and rubber mallet. This plus lamps - if not sacrificial aluminum heat sink lamps in getting that first seat into especially the S-4 PAR, but the aluminum base ones work better for this initial seating purpose. Following that first install, less a problem except for them bases that allowed the lamp to fall out of in say mis-cast or warping sufficient to not hold the lamp. Would really like a re-design for these sockets, if not better quality control but again water under the bridge.

    The PA version looks like a better option, though it should not be necessary - long standing fight with ETC in quality control say 1:10 needing to pound the lamp home and at times with new or later, the lamps simply falling out without a good seat..

    On the TP-22 bases, I created some HPL lamp popper pry bars for tight lamps over the years, wouldn’t work with other lamps, thinking some form of pliers needed for a TP-22. Some work fine, some on removing are harder than heck. On inserting, I don’t think that’s as much a problem though it can be a bit more painful them rough upper edges of a metal lamp base. Still, for them less a problem in getting them in for the most part as getting them out for me at least.

    The PA tool I think a good thing. Though I also think in a perfect world.... were the ETC fixture having good quality control, also something totally not needed. Wonder what ETC thinks in standpoint about such a tool’s invention. Either they have a problem at times in inserting lamps which is a quality control issue, or this thing invented is totally useless and not needed. Thus don’t exist for need. One or the other don’t reflect well for their PR people in avoiding the issue over the years instead of fixing a fix to it.
     
  4. ScaredOfHeightsLD

    ScaredOfHeightsLD Active Member

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    I have one in my toolbox and, while it is a much easier method than the shirt tail, I have found it impractical because it's never close by. I can't justify keeping it on my belt, because I don't use it enough. I think it is something I would rather see the theatres I work in buy and keep with their spare lamps, so when you go to grab a lamp, you grab this too.
     
  5. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    I don't have one, couldn't justify the purchase (most of what I change are projector lamps).

    Wait a sec, don't you guys have a tool bag with you when you're out dealing with the rig? If not, how far do you have to go to get your tools when something goes wrong?

    I could definitely see keeping one or two with lamp storage. If you have to go get a lamp, it's just as easy to grab the tool to go along with. The tricky part is getting people to put it back when they're done.
     
  6. David Ashton

    David Ashton Active Member

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    Could I suggest that the use of your shirt tails, which soaks up sweat, oil and other body fluids is not the wisest choice as a method to hold your lamps?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 19, 2012
  7. Schraff

    Schraff Member

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    Glad to hear folks like the tool. We developed it in response to the ETC manufacturing change mentioned earlier in the thread. We tried to come up with a decent solution for FELs, GLCs, and so forth, but the best we came up with was an additional kit of fiber washers that were close to the diameter of the lamp's envelope. When we field tested them we found that they got lost too easily. The cost for putting together the additional washers was also a bit more than our beta testers said they'd be willing to pay so we dropped the idea.

    Schraff
     
  8. Sony

    Sony Active Member

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    I don't use anything, I've gotten really good at not touching the crystal when installing HPL's. I use my thumbs on each side of the ceramic base and even pressure to push the lamp into the base. If it is being particularly troublesome then I will grab some papertowels and use more pressure, wiping off the lamp afterwards with an alcohol swab.
     
  9. 1kfresnel

    1kfresnel Member

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    In the lamps that come in packing foam, rather than suspended in a cardboard structure, I prefer that foam as my lamping aid -- compared to gloves, shirt tails, etc it hasn't been everywhere. We do keep a few slices of foam on the lamp shelf for those boxes that don't have them...but the sound guys love to use it for padding mics and the supply diminishes at times.
     
  10. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    For seating lamps, I just put the lamp in the socket, then turn the socket so it's facing away from me, and use three fingers from each hand to push the lamp towards me and into the socket. I believe that is the same way the ETC manuals instruct users how to install lamps.

    I'm also x2 on the foam rubber that is used for packing the lamps. That works really well for installing and removing lamps. I had a guy using that on some 360's and the lamp broke while he was trying to install it. His hand got cut up, but not nearly as bad as it would've if he didn't have the foam to protect him.
    I save all of the foam pieces and use them all sorts of stuff. They've been used for packing mic's away, PAR lens storage, and a number of other things. My desktop happens to be tempered glass, so I have my monitor sitting on a small piece of foam rubber so that it doesn't mark it up.
     
  11. Capi

    Capi Member

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    I actually tend to use them more often in removing lamps than inserting them, especially if the lamp I'm removing isn't bad (changing wattages for example). I don't have to worry about getting my grubby hands all over the envelope, and I feel it gives me a better grip. You just have to be careful you pull straight up, so you don't snap the envelope off the base, which I have done before. Handy tool, in my opinion.
     
  12. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    What I really want is something like this for the BTN.
     
  13. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    Your hand?

    Mike
     
  14. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    My main question about such a tool is what padding about the lamp and if it's say "dishwasher safe" between uses in grubby hands that tend to get into holes found, this than becoming a insertion tool and lamp destroyer as concept.

    Yes great idea and might buy a few but overall question about staying clean or if as a concept needing to re-clean the lamp after use not so much an option if on a ladder say.


    BTN changer, what you have not switched to the BTH? As long as not still hot, a sandwich bag should be well enough in turning to seat. This as long as the seat stops are sufficient. HX-600 extractor... that's a good complext tool to invent in also at times wrestling with them. Something like a Heyco tool I would think but with thin 45 degree duck bill type plires type tips set to insert into the socket perhaps.

    Beyond the HPL lamp extractor that's fairly simple spring steel J-Bar in design as concept not yet on the retail market persay - HPL lamp popper, Schraff, a G-9.5 lamp extractor for TP-22 type base, there is a chalenge. Hit the above up as your challenge.
     
  15. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    My want for a BTN changer was for dealing with 10-20 year old fresnels, it made sense for such a tool to me. Ever change one on the top of a ladder? Then you might understand.


    And we should be changing to BTH with the next lamp purchase.
     
  16. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Yep.. atop a A-Frame extension ladder type on casters to boot. Swinging and swaying as brave or stupid enough to do so. This type of lamp change. Feel your pain on changing a medium prefocus or P-28s lamp, but not much that can be done no matter if welded or screwing past their stops. Given the focus fin recess, my point was not much one could do with such a thing.

    Other lamp type side note. Sorry, but also been there - really been there in climbing a non-safety boom 20' up in the air to change a lamp also - now where does one hold the lamp while climbing C-Clamps? Them's olden days along with me without fall protection 46' above the stage on a bosemens chair sort of rigged to the grid... Just getting down to the antiqe chair was brave and stupid, this much less as I bolted stuff, my various added swaying in potentially falling off the swing.

    Inspect your lampholders before changing lamps by the way, won't matter BTL, BTN, or BTH, in the end, what sticks is often a bad welded to the lampholder lamp that sticks. Good fixture base on a Fresnel, shouldn't need a lamp popper. If it does, replace the fixture.
     
  17. thatactorguy

    thatactorguy Active Member

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    Re: Question about Source 4s


    Looks like I may have found a new toy! I've been fortunate in that I've not lost a lamp due to my fingers touching the glass, but anything to aid in the process of installation works in my book :)

    Now if there were a tool to remove spent lamps. I hold the base and gently rock them out, but constantly fear that the glass will shatter in my hand when it suddenly breaks loose from the socket...
     
  18. masterelectrician2112

    masterelectrician2112 Active Member

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    Re: Question about Source 4s

    Am I missing something here? The "lamp insertion tool" looks like a short piece of pvc with a cap on it. Unless there is something really special about that thing, I don't know how anybody would justify spending $10 on that thing when one could be made for much much less. I think I might just do that! Anybody see anything wrong with a homemade one of those?

    Anyways, when I am inserting a lamp, I have developed a method of taking it out of the box where I can slide the foam rubber up just enough to cover the top while leaving the base exposed. Then to seat the lamp, I very carefully avoid touching the top and just push with a few fingers.
     
  19. DanAyers

    DanAyers Member

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    Re: Question about Source 4s

    Other companies also sell it, usually for $15 each.

    If you make your own, make sure you have enough length to protect the glass.
    I plan on making my own as well.

    Dan
     
  20. Studio

    Studio Active Member

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    I use the foam that comes with the bulb inside works great and if the bulb shatters it will contain the smaller glass shards.
     

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