birdies

raeraeiam

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Location
Rochelle, Illinois
Does anyone know where you can get 'birdies'? I've heard them called that but I think they are technically Par 16s.. not sure about that though..
If anyone knows what I'm talking about and can tell me where to find them please post!
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2003
Location
Illinois
A Birdie by term is a low voltagle version of a PAR 16 fixture. Otherwise more often available is the line voltage - medium screw version of a PAR 20 fixture. Slightly larger but easier to lamp or depend upon.

Both are available from just about any theatrical supply service, though the actual birdy might be a little more hard to find these days.
 

mbandgeek

Active Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2006
Location
North Carolina
There a down graded version of the par 16? How much usable light do they produce?
 

jfitzpat

Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2005
Inaki2 said:
So ship...why is a birdie called a birdie? Doesn't look like a bird. I'm sure you have some background on it. Same with the Inkies (save the comment on my name...)
Think golf ('one under par'). Some of us old timers used to call them 'LPs' for 'little par cans'.

I have no clue what Inkies refers to, unless it is slang for incandescent.

-jjf
 

zac850

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2003
Location
New York
jfitzpat said:
Think golf ('one under par').

That makes so much sense, I think you have clarified the entire existence of the universe for me. (42)


An Inkie is a small 3" fresnel. I assume their is similar logic for why it is called that?
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2003
Location
Illinois
Inkie is because of PacMan you goof!

No, while Stagecraft once discussed in length the development of the "Birdie", I don't remember the advent of the Inkie but it probably has something to do with the movie industry.

If of help I do remember single contact versions of the Inkie still in constant use. Great help in the dark in a mixed inventory. Twist a dual contact into a single contact base and it would not work. Screw a single contact lamp into a dual contact newer base and you had an explosion as it were.

Useful light? if in need to ask this question....

The about max spread of a say PAR 20 can would be about 40 degrees I expect. Go to TMB or Thomas's webstiets and see if they have specs listed.

As for useful light, lots of it over that of a PAR by way of soft light and was.
 

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