Brusan Molding Cloth?

derekleffew

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Aug 21, 2007
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Las Vegas, NV, USA
Sorry, no experience, but sounds like a useful product. Here's the link for anyone interested. At first I thought you were referring to the successor to Celastic, nasty stuff, fingers frozen from the acetone, but it did have it's uses.

See also this thread. Similar application, different solution?
 
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hoff_2

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Jul 22, 2007
Location
scene shop
We use this stuff at my school. We have used it to make a mountain for the Sound of Music, a water fall for 13 Daughters, and a tree for To Kill a Mockingbird. I really like it, we get a lot of use out of it. we bought the printed version, no adhesive backing.
 

Brusan

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May 19, 2009
Location
Virginia
We use this stuff at my school. We have used it to make a mountain for the Sound of Music, a water fall for 13 Daughters, and a tree for To Kill a Mockingbird. I really like it, we get a lot of use out of it. we bought the printed version, no adhesive backing.
Would you have any pictures of what you made with the Brusan? If so, I would really like to see them and, if you agree, I would add them, with proper attribution of course, to our gallery of projects here: Projects
 
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BrianWolfe

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Jul 8, 2009
Location
New Windsor, NY
We tried it out as a replacement for Celastic. For our purposes it was not very useful. Most of our products have to hold up for a long time and be able to withstand some abuse. That being said I think it could be very useful for shows with a short run and if you can be sure it won't be touched or if it doesn't matter if the shape gets changed. The material is like an aluminum foil backed fabric. You can scrunch it and shape it but there is nothing to make it keep its shape beyond the metal film.
 

Brusan

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May 19, 2009
Location
Virginia
What you say is correct, although Celastic was an Hazardous non environment friendly material and Brusan may be ordered in thicker foil.

Interestingly, Brusan first application was for haute-couture hats. :)
 
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ship

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Mar 29, 2003
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Illinois
What you say is correct, although Celastic was an Hazardous non environment friendly material and Brusan may be ordered in thicker foil.

Interestingly, Brusan first application was for haute-couture hats. :)
Hmm, nope never seen it and the link didn't show a picture or info much. On the other hand from the long past Sculptural Arts Coatings brand of stuff I do think I remember specifically a product like commando cloth which with I believe water acted much like a fiberglass sheet once the coating was applied in holding a shape and being paintable. Wonder who bought out their product line amongst many products. Might be similar but without a foil backing and more latex in nature.

These concepts beyond some wire frame as faced with fabric or fiberglass for the solution. Or possibly a commando cloth or burlap as treated with one form or another of glue so as to retain a shape.
 

BrianWolfe

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Jul 8, 2009
Location
New Windsor, NY
I want to talk a little about celastic. I spent many a day up to my elbows in acetone (or lacquer thinner for form-fast which replaced it) and it was not pleasant. But there is no comparison with Brusan cloth, friendly plastic nor any of the other safer replacements for celastic. Celastic could be cut and sewn, it became like wet fabric when immersed in solvent, it could be draped beautifully and allowed the artist to show the structure underneath when desired and it hardens up like a board. I am not encouraging anyone to bathe in solvents but I have not yet seen a comparable replacement which does not require a solvent. That is why we wear chemical gloves and respirators when working with the stuff. Here are a couple of photos to illustrate my point:

This is the newel post for the masquerade scene in Phantom of the Opera:

A statue for Lance Burton in Las Vegas:

A 13' tall figure for the Merry Widow and a Moulin rouge party:

It is dangerous stuff and needs to be used with care and caution but the results are incredible in the hands of a capable artist.
 
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Brusan

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Joined
May 19, 2009
Location
Virginia
"But there is no comparison with Brusan cloth,"

Again, I fully concur: Brusan is an ideal product for sceneries, such as this one: