Building a Scrim

Footer

Senior Team
Senior Team
Premium Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2005
Location
Saratoga Springs, NY
So... I need a scrim for an upcoming show in a very odd shaped venue. The shop has a scrim reminant that fits the bill for the space I am in (13'x25' sized scrim). The fabric has salvage on both ends, but I need to put jute and a pipe pocket in. I have sewed cycs and drops before, so I know what I need to do, but does anyone have any tips on how to sew scrim/how to not get it to bind up.
 

Van

CBMod
CB Mods
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
The real trick to working with scrim, or velvet, or any thicker fabrics is to use a Walking foot machine. Either get a walking foot attachment, or find a walking foot machine. The "Walking Foot" refers to the fact that not only do the "dog teeth" on the bottom pull the fabric through, but the foot also moves up and down, back and forth, this helps pull all the fabric through at the same time. If you don't have access to a walking foot machine, then take it slow and steady, make sure you have plenty of pins in place < at least every 6"> and use two hands. feed the fabric into the machine with your right, while using your left to gently pull the fabric through from behind. Set the stitch length to a medium setting, trying to get through the job real fast using a long stitch length will only cause the fabric to bind up and off-set faster. Lastly keep an eye on you presser foot pressure. Too much pressure and your fabric will bind up in front of the foot, too little and the fabric wont feed.
Hope that helps.
 

sloop

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2007
Location
Indiana
The real trick to working with scrim, or velvet, or any thicker fabrics is to use a Walking foot machine. Either get a walking foot attachment, or find a walking foot machine. The "Walking Foot" refers to the fact that not only do the "dog teeth" on the bottom pull the fabric through, but the foot also moves up and down, back and forth, this helps pull all the fabric through at the same time. If you don't have access to a walking foot machine, then take it slow and steady, make sure you have plenty of pins in place < at least every 6"> and use two hands. feed the fabric into the machine with your right, while using your left to gently pull the fabric through from behind. Set the stitch length to a medium setting, trying to get through the job real fast using a long stitch length will only cause the fabric to bind up and off-set faster. Lastly keep an eye on you presser foot pressure. Too much pressure and your fabric will bind up in front of the foot, too little and the fabric wont feed.
Hope that helps.

Listen to Van, he has it right. The only other way besides pinning would be a basting stitch to hold it in place while you sew..
 

Van

CBMod
CB Mods
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Listen to Van, he has it right. The only other way besides pinning would be a basting stitch to hold it in place while you sew..
Yeah and the poblem with that is you have to keep pulling the scrim out of the oven every 30 minutes or so, and those syringes can get real hot, when full of hot Scrim drippings.

< happy Thanksgiving Y'all>
:mrgreen:
 

Users who are viewing this thread