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Bump Fade

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Oobleck1441, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. Oobleck1441

    Oobleck1441 Member

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    I'm more of a sound person... and yestarday working around the stage, I heard two people talking about cues and what not, running an upcoming show and discussing about a bump fade.
    I just know it has to do with lighting.. but no idea what a bump fade is.
    Can anyone fill me in?
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Generally people call zero count cues bumps because the lights don't fade they just bump on or off.
     
  3. jmabray

    jmabray Active Member

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    What I have called a bump fade in the past is usually a cue, or series of cues that takes place at the end of a musical number.

    The Lights bump up to highlight the end of the song, usually in a quick count (2, 1 or even 1/2 a second). They wait there for the applause to die down, and then they fade down to a lower level.
     
  4. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Most places I have been refer to that end of a musical number as the "button" of the number and buttons often have bumps. However, sometimes the action in a scene dictates a bump cue or the end or beginning of a scene.
     
  5. Wolf

    Wolf Active Member

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    im a LD/normal LT crew. I have always used the term bumb to mean to raise the intensities (level) of a light or group of lights. Under a submaster there will be a button that is called a bump button that if pressed will raise the level of all the lights in the submaster to full in less than a sec. Basicly bump is used to say raise the level of a light/group of light to full (100%).
     
  6. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say a bump is necessarily to full, I think bump is a time frame. Yes once you push the button under the fader the light in most cases goes to full as fast at the fixture can, but remember as soon as you let go of the button it restores to its set level in the same amount of time. Calling spots I say fade in/out to mean a nice 2 or 3 count and bump in/out to mean as fast as possible. If I were to hear the term bump fade I would think a cue that comes in at a 0 count (aka as fas as possible) holds for a set period of time that isn't very long and then fades out... Well there's my .02
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    A bump is any change of a lighting state that happens in zero time: bump to full, bump to black, bump to frame#1, bump to full body. Those who've ever run a multi-scene preset console are familiar with the seemingly (but not) oxymoronic term: "bump crossfade".

    Some CYM Moving Lights do better color bumps than others, though none are as good as LEDs.
     
  8. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    Never heard of a bump fade, not even a "Bump CrossFade" as Derek calls it, though I know what he's reffering to.

    Bump is a zero count, from one state to another.
    Fade has a time, Ditto.

    And while we are on the subject, as far as I'm concerned, the term "x count blackout" should be banned. A blackout in my mind has a zero count, probably a result of 30 years of occasionally working with poorly trained, or no-training-required stage managers from 3rd world countries (and/or dance recital teachers) screaming "BLACKOUT - BLACKOUT", with no standby (and forget the concept of warning - or planning/thinking ahead in general). And no GO word used anywhere.

    A fadeout has a time. Yes - a blackout refers to a state of no intensity

    And while we are on the subject of 3rd world "stage managers" and/or dance recital teachers, remember that the term "Lights" usually is a request to change the lighting to whatever state they are currently in, to another state. If there's lighting on stage, then it would be a change to no lighting on stage, sometimes with an associated "BLACKOUT - BLACKOUT" screamed across the headset. Usually followed about 5 painful minutes later by another "Lights", meaning restore back to the previous state of lighting on stage.

    In case anyones wondering, it's dance recital season at our facility.

    Sigh

    SB
     
  9. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    One can infer from this that you're implying "0 Seconds" is not a time. Big difference between "time zero" and "no time". It used to be on many consoles, if the operator did not enter a time, it was a "manual" fade. Today most desks use the default timing if none is entered.

    And "blackout" can be either a verb or a noun. "Five count fade to blackout" and "Blackout, GO" are both acceptable. I agree with you that a blackout is a bump to black. See the glossary entry: Bump (Lighting).
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2008
  10. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    I had on my designer hat while typing.

    When a designer/SM/director/other flavor of total idiot of the day, requests a cue/look to Bump, I then put on my Operator hat and configure the console to do whatever they have asked. On the Express, if we are writing/modifying cues, then it's Cue X, Time Zero (0), enter, enter.

    I've assumed that a request for a Bump means a time of zero, for any kind of change - Blackout or change to new look,, so absolutely - a Bump has a time.

    When they ask for a Blackout and after having watched the blackout cue run and they ask to change it to a 2 second blackout, I nicely ask them if them mean a fade-out. After they've asked multiple times for 2 second blackouts, I generate my snottiest tone of voice and respond with - "Got it - a 2 second FADEOUT !".

    SB
     
  11. vidfan

    vidfan Member

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    I use a combination of bump FX while busking. For stagewashing I use a bump on/off.(one tap on next tap off) That way I can set and forget. For FX and specials I use the type were the light snaps on but kills as soon as you let go of the button,(I think it's called step/bump) alowing me to control the time manualy or chase by druming my fingers. Also when programing I don't allways set the intensity at full.

    Not the smartest but I try.
     
  12. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Good points, vidfan, but I caution you to be careful of your terminology. While we usually call them "bump buttons" or "flash buttons" or "executor buttons", many boards allow the user to set the buttons' specific behavior, sometimes globally, others independently.

    I would call that a "latching flash button".

    "Momentary flash button".

    Another type is often labeled "Solo" or "Swap", where the contents are flashed to the recorded level and all other channels are forced to zero.

    Below are the various functions which can be assigned to the buttons associated with an Executor on the grandMA:
    - FADE: With the Fader, the fade-in time between cues can be set manually, when using Chasers.
    - Speed: Chaser speed can be set with the Fader.
    - Xfade: With the Fader, you can manually crossfade all parameters into the next cue of the sequence.
    - XF A: If Split Crossfade is active, you can fade out the Cue that is currently playing back when pushing the fader upwards or downwards.
    If Split Crossfade is not active, you can fade out to the darkening Dimmer channels of the next Cue when pushing the fader upwards or downwards.
    - XF B: If Split Crossfade is active, you can use the Fader to fade in the next Cue when pushing the fader upwards or downwards.
    If Split Crossfade is not active, you can fade out to the next Cue and to the brightening Dimmer channels when pushing the fader upwards or downwards.
    - Empty: Fader has no function.
    - Rate: Using the Fader, you can change all fade and delay times for sequences. If the fader is at 50%, all times will be executed in the normal way. Using the RATE 1 button, you can automatically set the Fader back to the 50% position.
    - MFade: This fader controls master in & outfade in a range from 0 to 10 seconds. It is used when starting or switching off the running chase. With the encoder the "master fade“ can be set to “DEFAULT“. In this position the predefined MFade from the menu setup/defaults/playback timing will be used.
    - Temp: Use the Fader to temporarily fade in the first Cue(step), then, the previous status will be restored, similar to the "Temp“ key.
    By a touch on the respective KEY symbol, a selection will appear in which any button can be allocated with different functions.
    - Go: The cue will be played back with all programmed FADE and DELAY times.
    - Go–: For sequences, the previous cue is played back and all changes are executed (full tracking) using all
    programmed FADE and DELAY times. For Chasers, the running direction will be reversed.
    - Pause: A running cue or a Chaser will be temporarily stopped. To continue use GO+ or GO–.
    - On: Reasserts the priority of the Executor making it the latest action thus overriding other executors which were previously overriding it (LTP).
    - Off: Switches the Executor off so that it no longer outputting cue data to stage.
    - Rate 1: Puts the RATE FADER to 50% position (RATE Fader).
    - Learn: Direct entering of the Chaser speed. When pressing this button at least three times, the Chaser speed is set.
    - <<<: Playback of the previous cue without FADE or SNAP times.
    - >>>: Playback of the next cue without FADE or SNAP times.
    - Temp: A Cue or chaser plays back as long as the button is pressed. Upon releasing the button, previous condition will be restored.
    - Top: Resets the Sequence to the first cue.
    - Empty: Button has no function.
    - Flash: Sets the Dimmer channels in the current cue to 100% of their programmed value. Starts the sequence, if not already activated.
    - Out: Sets the Dimmer channels in the current cue to 0% of their programmed value. Starts the sequence, if not already activated..
    - Toggle: To switch on and off the Sequence or Chaser.
    - Fix: Will fix sequence or chaser on this executor, even when switching PAGES here (this will be displayed by an
    orange background in the small EXECUTOR window).
    - Load: Pressing the button on the right TFT display will open a chart for this sequence where you can select and
    directly load the next cue to be played back in the sequence (LOAD CUE). Start the cue using the GO button.
    - Select: Makes this executor the Selected Sequence.
    - Swop: As long as the button is pushed all other dimmer channels are faded out, except with executors, where "Swop Protected“ has been activated.
    - Kill: Has the same function as GO, but will switch off all running Executors.

     
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  13. vidfan

    vidfan Member

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    Thank you for helping with the terminoligy of things,learning the speak is one thing that's comming a little slow to me becouse I have been solo for much of my learning.
    I am most familier with the spot call "bump to no color" but it did sound like he was talking about light cues. I get questions like this from my sound guys all the time. The better I understand the better I can explain. I know it can be frustersting sometimes working with the new guy but we were all new at some point, and who knowes next month we could be working together.

    Still trying to figure out how to get a Gobo in the sun.
     
  14. jrdeamicis

    jrdeamicis Member

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    Bump fade? Uptime 0 dwell 0 downtime 3 (or x).

    For example that could be interepted as a bumpfade on an express board.

    ..
     

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