Burr shoots Hamilton, Audience Panics, Three Injured

Ancient Engineer

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Sep 21, 2017
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Sandusky, Ohio
Did some quick calcs: VOG at the place I am currently earning my keep from fires nearly 275 speakers simultaneously over a mile long corridor...

Some delay artifacting may occur.

We now return you to your regularly serious posting.
 
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gafftaper

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Did some quick calcs: VOG at the place I am currently earning my keep from fires nearly 275 speakers simultaneously over a mile long corridor...
Some delay artifacting may occur.
We now return you to your regularly serious posting.
That's amazing!
 

maccalder

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Nov 14, 2008
My Red Cross first aid training suggests getting someone to find and bring the first aid kit and/or AED for almost any situation. That doesn't mean it's going to be used, just that it's immediately available if needed. I'm torn regarding the local alarm and the summoning emergency personnel. As someone responding to the situation, I'd err on the side of caution and call 911. But as a business, I understand that a number of false alarms can get you reprimanded or punished. I wouldn't want opening the cabinet to have the AED in a standby to cause more issues. Though at that level, I suppose the management that installed the thing can take responsibility for any issues.
I would be very against it calling the emergency services - as they tend to be costly when incorrectly called out - however alerting campus security/campus EMTs - that is a good thing. Any large facility worth it's salt is going to have an incident management process. Whilst I would expect the person in charge of the facility at the time to have a significant knowledge of those processes and procedures, from a risk management point of view the sooner you can get a patient from being checked over by a trained first aider, to "in the care of a trained EMT" the better. I used to be the tech manager for a theatre located in a casino in Australia. Our EMT's had advanced life support equipment - essentially the contents of an ambulance or a small ER - on site and there were always 2 EMT's on duty.

Any medical alarms would report to our SOC, and our SOC would dispatch EMT's accordingly - depending on the method of alarm (phone, pull point, automated (AED)) their responses differed - they had a line to the various emergency services and could have an ambulance "re-positioning" themselves to be more convenient to the potential emergency without issuing a full blown alarm, or they could have a full on response initiated.

The great thing about the EMT's response from my point of view as a manager - I would have an incident - for example someone made a major booboo and gave themselves an electric shock - startled, but appear okay. Call the SOC. EMT's arrive, one takes the patient down to their treatment room and chuck them on an ECG, the other gets the statements from those around the area, fills out the incident report and files it. They also file the report with the power company and with the relevant government agencies. I have no need to worry that the paperwork wasn't done. I knew that appropriate treatment was delivered, that from a legal standpoint I am covered (for response to the incident, not for the event causing it) and that most importantly, someone with more than a couple of days first aid training has checked the person out and they are okay and not going to pass out from an abnormal heart rhythm when they get home.
 

icewolf08

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Lititz, PA
In many jurisdictions it is a requirement that if the fire alarm is triggered, it kills the house audio system. The idea is that it ensures that the fie alarm is the loudest thing and that people actually hear it. Now,this may not be feasible in places like arenas and stadiums or even many road houses where the show is bringing in a sound system that may be entirely separate from the house system.

As such, it is entirely possible that the venue did try to play a canned announcement but if the house system was disabled by the alarm, no one would have heard. Especially problematic if your technicians don’t know that this happens.

In the theatre I used to work at, the house system was killed by building alarms. The alarm just tripped the power sequencers on the amp racks. We knew this was the case, so if we had alarms, we knew to reboot the system before sending someone out with a mic. Otherwise, we just sent someone out with a loud voice.

Suffice it to say, there is no way that anyone could have known this particular incident was going to happen. If people around the patient panicked, it doesn’t take much to incite mass panic. Consider also that in many theatres, the house staff is mostly volunteer, and many only come to one or two performances of any given show. They may have one or two trainings each year, but are not regularly trained and updated.
 

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