C-Wrenches

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2003
Location
Illinois
What does one look for in a quality C-Wrench as similar to shopping for a caliper, and also as similar to a bolt threading?

Short of these two main seperate issues in quality, what problems might the C-Wrench have in use? (Or why we don't all just buy "Made in China" for our C-Wrench.)

How in shopping for a C-Wrench does one inspect for these concepts by way of choosing between brands and specific tools of a brand?
 

soundman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2003
Location
Nashville TN
One thing I look for is the amount of slop in the jaws, to sloppy and getting a good grip is a pain. As far as being simuler to bolts, the higher the TPI the easier it will be to get a snug fit but it will take longer to travel from F bolt to the yoke bolt.
 

Van

CBMod
CB Mods
Premium Member
Joined
Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
I second Soundman. The better the threads on the adjustment knob the better. I also prefer a stiffer feel to the adjustment so it doesn't loosen up onit's own. Hardness of the steel and thickness of the chrome plating is also a big factor the softer the steel the more likely the jaws are going to flex on thier own and slip resulting in a modified "Vice-bolt" < the kind you can only loosen with vice grips> The thickness of the chrome will keep it from cracking off the jaws and cause rusting or degradation of those surfaces.
 

soundlight

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2005
Location
NJ & NYC
As long as I buy Craftsman:

I know that the tool is going to be of good quality, because of my experience with their hand tools.

And, if it ever stops threading properly, I just take it back for a new one!
 

fosstech

Active Member
Joined
Jun 7, 2004
Location
Tacoma, WA USA
Exactly! That's why I buy Craftsman hand tools. If I screw it up somehow, just head back to the store and exchange. I wish that policy extended to their power tools! Back home we have one of their "guaranteed never to break" fiberglass-handled shovels. I think we've gone through three or four of them already ;)

Cheap C wrenches with sloppy jaws really annoy me. They're one of my biggest pet peeves while hanging or focusing.
 

sound_nerd

Active Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2004
Location
Toronto Ontario
I keep a look for sloppy jaws, although not so much the threading on them, never thought to.
I do like some sort of grippable surface, my current wrench is a Crescent brand with the red grip. Although I have used a NiteIze brand mini-mag grip slipped over a standard c-wrench before and it works just as well, also giving the option of a clip.
Just recently worked with a head carpenter who has a 12" c-wrench with a flat hammer surface on the back of the head. I thought this was wonderful, he mentioned that it was originally intended for miners, he's from northern Canada.
 

ship

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2003
Location
Illinois
What does one look for in a quality C-Wrench as similar to shopping for a caliper, and also as similar to a bolt threading?
I was more thinking by way of inspecting the tool, no matter the brand. When you are choosing this tool, how to you inspect it's quality over another one say of the same brand in the rack?


Another sub-question, if you turn the bolt clockwise, which side of the wrench do you have downward in that direction? Heavy side down or heavy side up? (By heavy side, I mean the screw thread part on the clockwise side and under the bolt or atop the bolt as it turns? This as opposed to open jaw side under or over the bolt as it turns clockwise?)