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Can a Scoop be used as a simple LINNEBACH PROJECTOR?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by TupeloTechie, Oct 25, 2007.

  1. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

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    I was just wondering if a scoop light could be used as an LINNEBACH PROJECTOR? As the effect would be very useful in an upcoming production of crimes of the heart.

    also, these scoops are the ones with pre-focus lamp bases, not screw.
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Depends where the object you want to "project" is, and the spread of the fixture. I know fresnels and any ERS work well for this, but its worth a try with the scoop.
     
  3. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    I think it would work if you blacked out the reflector with black wrap.
     
  4. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    You would be better off with a point source light as you are trying to project something and the diffuse reflector on a scoop would take all the detail out of the image. The original Linnebach projector was a point source light in a big metal box which you would put a large transparency over, thus projecting a background. (Later units worked more like a regular projector with a lens)
    If you had an old scoop that you didn't care about, you could paint the inside with flat black stove paint and put a small filament quartz lamp in it. You would need to suspend the transparency slightly away from the front to reduce heat buildup. Good luck!
     
  5. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

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    I don't really need much detail, I was just wanting to use them to project cloudy like blobs on the cyc, as we don't have the money or time to order gobos for the effect.
     
  6. David Ashton

    David Ashton Active Member

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    If you remove the lens from a fresnel that works fine and you still have the framing of your image with the barndoors and the ability to make it as wide as you need with the focus.
     
  7. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

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    we don't have any extra fresnels
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    If it has a lens it can't, by definition, be called a Linnebach projector.
     
  9. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Don't tell KELITE I said this, but disposable aluminum cookie sheets are inexpensive at the grocery store and a "cloud shape" is fairly easy to cut out with a utility knife. One ERS on each end of the 1st electric cross-shooting onto the cyc and fuzzed out can look great for about $5 in materials and 30 minutes time.

    Or you could rent 10 MAC2000 Performances and buy custom cloud animation wheels from Apollo.;)
     
  10. TupeloTechie

    TupeloTechie Active Member

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    well... I will also say that the 2 ERSs we have are both already being used with homemade gobos for a stage breakup wash...

    This space is not the greatest, whoever was in charge before our current administrator "traded" all of the ERS's on the FOH bar for Par 64s. And whats bad is that he traded them 1 for 1... stupid.
     
  11. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Okay, fair enough. We'll help you find a sorry soul to "trade them back."

    Advantages of PARS over ERSs (no need to list disadvantages, please)
    1) Lighter weight
    2) Faster to focus, fewer adjustments
    3) Greater efficacy: More light per watt
    4) "Industry standard" for Rock and Country shows
    5) Oval beam means you can have a circle at an oblique angle
    5a) Easier to light either vertical or horizontal actors
    6) No cleaning necessary--you get a fresh reflector and lens every time you change the bulb
    6a) No need to constantly "bench focus"
    7) You can touch the envelop with your bare fingers!
    8) Save money by not having to buy R119 or R132 to soften the edge

    With a list like that, who wouldn't want to trade their crummy ERSs for "state of the art" PAR64s? "Better act soon, because the theatre in the next town is really interested in these." And I bet you have a fence that needs painting, too!
     
  12. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Pre-Focus scoop bases? Fascinating.

    A Lienbacher projector is all about the filament - focal center of the point source of the filament in relation to the projected image.

    Black wrap the reflector so as to reduce double and odd images and you now have the single filament point source projector at a less efficient state. Possible your reflector will be re-focusing sufficient but doubtful short of a gate the size of your filament.

    In doing the projected image, you are trying to have what’s a parallel or point source of beam come out of the image. Cover the reflector, you now have this. Next is all about focusing the image of the slide to that of between the set and image plane or slide. Also a really graphic slide.

    Once you get this distance and play in focusing it, lock down the slide at that distance and done, the scoop now a projector. Mask off the stray light. You will no doubt need like a 36" lens train to do so and a 24" slide or larger if sizable the image.

    Back in my day I did so out of some Century 8x9 fixtures which were once reflector and lens train removed about similar to a 14" scoop in size. Worked well with a large sheet of acrylic plastic that was painted with an image. No worry about heat, the image plane was far too remote from the projector. Much harder to mask the stray light and affix the panel to the fixture than any heat issues on the plastic with latex paint on it.

    Final note or curiosity is what wattage the scoops are? If under 1Kw, in expecting about half the normal intensity, you will have problems. If 2Kw, you are probably golden.
     

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