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Certification, credentials

Discussion in 'Education and Career Development' started by Amy Jo Parish, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. Amy Jo Parish

    Amy Jo Parish New Member

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    Hello! I am a technical director (full-time) for a high school. I have been involved with productions for nearly 25 years (since high school). I am researching opportunities/classes I can complete to gain certification, certifications, credibility, etc. in the field. Any suggestions? I have a master's in public relations and took a year for tech theatre classes. I am not looking for a full degree, just workshops or the like to help me gain more knowledge in the field.

    Thanks for any input you can give!
     
  2. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Well, the ETCP program is probably the most creditable. There is a difference between a certificate for attending class or such - being certificated - versus being certified - which is what the ETCP program is about. http://etcp.esta.org/

    I can't speak to the value and quality of other programs, but would think trying to find college level classes would be the best source.
     
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  3. DavidJones

    DavidJones Member

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    Is being the TD a full-time job, or do you also teach theater or other classes? Is there other staff that would benefit from similar training? My thought here is that if there are other theater community members or other schools it might be easier/cheaper to get so training arranged as a group.
    If you are not looking for a degree, I see no reason not to audit some college design classes.
    Richard Cadena is the authority on electricity for entertainment and teaches excellent classes. His class is the prep for the ETCP electricians test.
    I took Jay Glerum's theater rigging seminar years ago, it was also very good. I'm sure others must teach a similar class now. Hopefully others on here can point you in the right direction.
     
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  4. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

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    What type of certification are you looking for? The above mentioned classes are geared for an electrical understanding and certification. Is that what you are looking for, or were you looking for something else?
     
  5. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    If you can attend USITT, you will find a lot of relevant workshops.
     
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  6. Amy Jo Parish

    Amy Jo Parish New Member

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    I do just about every type of job at the theater so really any area is open. From designing sets, building sets, lighting, sound, maintenance, and so much more! :)
     
  7. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Some may say this is not worth it, but my observations and listening and reading suggest falls are still the most common hazard working in stages and auditoriums. If you are responsible for the safety of others,you might consider an OSHA 10 and/or OSHA 30 course. I think you would become more knowledgeable about falls but more than that, its a good defense if there is an incident to be able to show you and the institution were proactive to make the space safer. Just a thought, and its a recognized credential and should be available not too far from anywhere in the (continental) US. I'd always recommend the in person training, but you will fond options.
     
  8. ruinexplorer

    ruinexplorer Minion CB Mods Premium Member Fight Leukemia

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    As someone who just completed the OSHA30, I would recommend this as well. Some of it may seem common sense, but at least it helps to reinforce a culture of safety and at best it will open your eyes to dangers (and regulations ) that you might not have recognized.
     
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  9. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Ideally if you get the OSHA 10/30, try to do it at USITT through the IATSE class. It is tailored specifically toward the entertainment industry and some specific hazards and work practices of our business.

    If you get it from your local construction safety educator, the class still covers a lot of the same issues about slips, trips, and falls, and addresses scaffolding and ladder safety, but there's also a lot of stuff in there that won't be of use to you like safe working practices in trenches or crane operations.
     
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  10. Amy Jo Parish

    Amy Jo Parish New Member

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    I was just looking at this class at USITT. The administration (as I am sure it is in other schools) doesn't really realize the amount of safety training that should be conducted with the stage crew (students). Their training is all up to me and I would just like some formal reinforcement/training to back this up. Thanks for the tip - much appreciated!
     
  11. BillConnerFASTC

    BillConnerFASTC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    After fall protection - which affects everyone that comes onto a stage because of the many fall hazards found no where else - I suspect some schooling in rigging might be warranted - thinking safety.
     
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