Chauvet LED Strobe

Joined
Dec 14, 2007

SerraAva

Active Member
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Sep 10, 2007
Location
Southern New Jersey
I actually own one myself. It is a nice little unit. There are a bunch of crazy things that the unit can do like scroll banks of LEDs on and off, and strobe individual banks, so its not just a strobe. As far as the color, its not a pure white color, more like a 5600K. The best way to describe it is take an RGB LED and run it up full, and it looks more or less like that shade of white. It strobes just like a normal strobe however.

The only other issue with it is it won't be as powerful as say a 750w strobe with a 1500w burst. At the same time, they don't use nearly as much power. Two would be great for a small space in my opinion.
 

JD

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Jan 1, 2005
Location
North Wales PA
Well, xenon strobes aren't really white either ;) White LEDs are actually UV LEDs with phosphor inside converting it to visible light, so think "florescent white."
 
Joined
Dec 14, 2007
Sounds like that these are a good buy. How would the brightness compare to that of a 75 Watt strobe?
The reason I asked about the color is that some people said the whites actually look blue. But that doesn't seem to be the case here.
 

avkid

Not a New User
Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
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Lakewood, NJ
There are pure white LED's.
If you have a couple of thousand $ to import them from Japan where they are currently being tweaked to enter the open market.
 

icewolf08

CBMod
CB Mods
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Jan 11, 2007
Location
Lititz, PA
There are pure white LED's.
If you have a couple of thousand $ to import them from Japan where they are currently being tweaked to enter the open market.
What is "pure white?" A no color source four puts out white light, and a Mac 2k outputs white light, but if you shine the Mac next to the source four it looks blue. (or the S4 looks yellow) Both are white though, just different color temps. Sure, what we are used to as white LEDs lean more towards the Lavs and blues, but that doesn't necessarily make them not white. The rage of color temps that we perceive as white is pretty wide, which makes our perception of what is white become heavily based on other colors around.
 

TupeloTechie

Active Member
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Oct 29, 2006
Location
New York City
Isn't pure white something around 4300K?

also isn't white light just a trick of our brains? a perception that our brains get by mixing the light received by each red green and blue node in our eyes?

many white LEDs are blue LEDs with a chemical that also emits yellow light, blue and yellow being complementary colors they mix down in our brains to be the perception of white.

so in other words I don't think you will notice the difference between the white light emitted from this strobe and the white light emitted from another strobe unless they are placed side by side, well you might, as your a lighting person, but nobody else will.
 
Joined
Dec 14, 2007
so in other words I don't think you will notice the difference between the white light emitted from this strobe and the white light emitted from another strobe unless they are placed side by side, well you might, as your a lighting person, but nobody else will.
Ha ha, your probobly right! I just wanted to make sure their wasn't and extreem difference between the two.
 

JD

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Location
North Wales PA
also isn't white light just a trick of our brains? a perception that our brains get by mixing the light received by each red green and blue node in our eyes?
Yes and no. We see three primary colors, RGB, so one would think that we could trick our eyes into seeing white with the right mix of RGB from LEDs.

Here's the NO part:

Objects can reflect ANY wavelength of light, so an object that is reflecting "orange" may be reflecting one specific wavelength from sunlight that we perceive as orange. Shine a "white" RGB light source at it and if the output of the RGB components do not cover the specific wavelength the object was reflecting, it may look black! Sunlight and incandescent lights are both broad spectrum sources, but LEDs, CLFs, and other sources are not. In the case of RGB LED units, the LEDs tend to be very monochromatic.
 

SerraAva

Active Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2007
Location
Southern New Jersey
It is more powerful then a 75w strobe easy. They are probably in the range of a 300-500w strobe, depending on location and distance to the target. If I get a chance later this week, I will snap some shots of it. If not, I will go for next week as it looks like I am in the office next week.