Cheeseboroughs not rated?

gafftaper

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My local theater supplier tells me that they are no longer selling the traditional iron cheeseboroughs that you get for a little under $20 each. Instead they are carrying an aluminum cheeseborough that costs $60. The reason is that the iron ones are not rated for overhead use.

What are your thoughts?

Especially curious what @egilson1 and @What Rigger? have to say
 
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gafftaper

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I don't think I've ever seen an iron cheeseborough, only cast and milled aluminum. Any links?
Yeah I was thinking the same thing but decided to post exactly as I was told by the vendor. I haven't worked with a lot of cheeseburgers, and It's been about 8 years. But the one's I have worked with I don't remember being iron.
 
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Ya, sure. Why not.

Most R&R shows that I come into contact with them are using the lightsource milled ones, but that has more to do with not crushing truss then anything else.

I guess the millions of scaffold towers that are held together with this things that people walk under all the time are bad now?
 

gafftaper

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I guess the millions of scaffold towers that are held together with this things that people walk under all the time are bad now?
That's what I was thinking...

Looking for a good argument against going with what we've been using for decades.
 
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Van

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BillConnerFASTC

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It is steel - same as iron to some - and claims it "meets OSHA standards"(as well as CSA and ANSI):

Features
Heavy duty galvanized steel for maximum corrosion resistance
Dual 90 degree bolt on clamp has a range of 1.66 to 1.90 in.
Will work with both standard and arched MetalTech frames
Meets OSHA standards

I suspect there is a difference between this being used for cross bracing - its labeled purpose - versus supporting live loads directly - and also being a part of a system. Someone else can research this. You need to get a definition of
not rated for overhead use.
(And certainly this shouldn't deter anyone that uses grade 30 chain for overhead lifting. i.e.: trim chains.)

I do quickly find a "Global Truss Pro Swivel Clamp" at Full Compass for $23 that is rated for 1100 pounds. Same rating as the Light Sources aluminum at $38.95. Doughty is 1653 pounds and $93 at Sapsis. I'd use Light Sources or Doughty, but then I use their rated c-clamps, and not ETC's unrated iron ones.

Load ratings are anything but simple.
 

What Rigger?

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I think I'll ask around about this when I'm back in tomorrow.
 
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danTt

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There's no rating for vertical suspension using cheeseboroughs, but that's true with the fancy new aluminum ones as well. Steel boroughs hold much better in my experience. Sounds like a dealer with a good vendor deal or conflicting information.
 

RonHebbard

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(Never mind)
Never what??
(Is that akin to I thought I wanted to post but thought better of it and now I can't delete it??) [Use EDIT to insert a serious profanity and watch how fast it'll be deleted. I could PM you one that's got me deleted two out of two times.]
Yoodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

danTt

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The Lightsource ones are so much nicer for most things though, Still, double the cost of the industrial scaff clamps, but way more convenient IMO.
I agree, but the threads also get damaged much easier in my experience (especially once people get out the wrench...) It's far more common to see a crossthreaded/unusable lightsource clamp than a traditional scaffold clamp.
 
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DavidJones

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I agree, but the threads also get damaged much easier in my experience (especially once people get out the wrench...) It's far more common to see a crossthreaded/unusable lightsource clamp than a traditional scaffold clamp.
You can buy all the parts separately though, so repairs are pretty cheap.