Cleaning Chalk off a Wall

deadlygopher

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2008
Location
San Francisco, CA
I recently inherited a theater space on campus, and am trying to clean things up a lot.

A show last year used chalk to write on the walls, and there's still a ton of residue. Any recommendations for how I might get it off?
 

zmb

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Location
Seattle, WA
What's the surface of wall and what have you already tried.

First solution that comes to mind, if it won't damage the wall, is a Magic Eraser if the residue is really stuck. Other solution would be some dish soap and water.
 

avkid

Not a New User
Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
Location
Howell, NJ
What's the wall surface?
 

kiwitechgirl

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Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Location
Sydney, Australia
I worked on a show where the set was a giant blackboard and the cast drew on it. We tried so many things to get it clean between shows and bizarrely, found that Coke was good, followed by warm soapy water....
 

Van

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Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Depends on what kind of chalk was used also. If it was 'Dustless' chalk then you will have to use something that will breakdown the wax first like Goo-Gone, or Denatured Alcohol, being mindful of the surface material of course. This is why < Important safety tip coming up here> You want to never use Dustless chalk when marking soft goods for hemming, or marking points on a floor for layout as it comes out, or up, with the brush of a hand.
Oh, and red chalk line chalk will permanently stain any fabric it comes in contact with and there is no way to remove it.
 

techietim

Active Member
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May 7, 2012
Location
England, UK
Can you not simply paint the wall? :p
 

Van

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Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Can you not simply paint the wall? :p
Oddly enough, if it was dustless chalk then, no, they won't be able to as the wax will keep anything from adhering. Except, Maybe Shellac.
 

Dustincoc

Active Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2006
Location
Madrid, New York
Depends on what kind of chalk was used also. If it was 'Dustless' chalk then you will have to use something that will breakdown the wax first like Goo-Gone, or Denatured Alcohol, being mindful of the surface material of course. This is why < Important safety tip coming up here> You want to never use Dustless chalk when marking soft goods for hemming, or marking points on a floor for layout as it comes out, or up, with the brush of a hand.
Oh, and red chalk line chalk will permanently stain any fabric it comes in contact with and there is no way to remove it.
Black chalkline is even more permanent than red.

I'd try something like Simple-Green to clean it off. If that doesn't work, I'd probably paint over it.

Chalkline Permanency Scale.jpg
 
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