The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Coax cable combo tools, any good?

Discussion in 'Multimedia, Projection, and Show Control' started by gafftapegreenia, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,415
    Likes Received:
    576
    Occupation:
    Screw gun for hire
    Location:
    Chicago
    So, all the coax I've been using lately has made me think about the day, likely soon, when I might need to put connectors on coax. Question is, has anyone used the following combination coax tools pictured. I'm looking for some opinions before "no you should just get a jacket stripper and ratcheting coax crimper".

    Klein VDV010-019
    [​IMG]

    Ideal 30-433
    [​IMG]
     
  2. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

    Messages:
    1,435
    Likes Received:
    153
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Well, these don't work with Snap 'n Seal connectors, which are the ones I swear by for F-connections. I'd take a look into those - they're more expensive, but I haven't had a single one fail on me ever.
     
  3. Dionysus

    Dionysus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,108
    Likes Received:
    189
    Occupation:
    Technical Director
    Location:
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Both of those tools I don't care much for. I only trust crimp-on F connectors.


    [​IMG]

    The compression tool isen't the same one I use, mine is older, and has scissor like handles...

    [​IMG]

    I put on a on a lot of ends sometimes.

    The non-compression ends, don't work as well, and they are more work to put on... not to mention... They pop off too easy!
     
  4. museav

    museav CBMod CB Mods Departed Member

    Messages:
    4,017
    Likes Received:
    562
    Occupation:
    Acoustical, audio and audiovisual consultant
    Location:
    Marietta, GA
    There are coax connectors other than F connectors, are you only addressing F connectors? Getting into BNCs and some others can be very connector and cable dependent. Just yesterday I had to make a Contractor reterminate a number of cables because the first BNC termination I looked at was showing shield and when I went to pull it off the equipment chassis connector to look at it, it fell apart. Apparently they used a stripper (thus the shield showing) and crimp die (thus the BNC pulling off the cable) for a connector other than that actually used, but at least the pin stayed on the center conductor.
     
  5. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,415
    Likes Received:
    576
    Occupation:
    Screw gun for hire
    Location:
    Chicago
    Dionysus- The tools I pictured are for CRIMPING connectors.

    mbenois: The Klein tool is advertised as being able to strip RG6 and RG59 cable and crimp F and BNC connectors.

    I'm looking for something decent and capable to have on hand. If I end up doing something specific often then I'll look at a tool for that specially but right now I want my base covered.

    look guys I"m kinda a noob at this stuff so I'm hoping this can turn into an education thread.
     
  6. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

    Messages:
    782
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Arlington, TX
    Good point. Even within a basic "RG-ish" type (1505A vs 8241, for example -- and the other variations on the RG59 theme) there will be dimensional variations, so different connector and die and all. A couple of years ago I kluged an RG59 clamp BNC onto a length of RG8X cable. It worked fine, and then after a fair while it didn't work. Go to open it up and figure it out, and the connector falls off -- oops.

    Then you've got more extreme variations on the RG59 theme like 1694A, which is significantly larger than 59/U, technically isn't 59/U in terms of, well, everything but characteristic impedance.

    But for typical RG-6 applications, I bet either tool would work -- that seems to be more universally standard; video has a bazillion different improvements on 59/U.

    BTW, those are Belden part numbers I listed.
     
  7. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    2,343
    Likes Received:
    382
    Location:
    Kilmarnock, VA
    I have a tool like this one

    [​IMG]

    It is supplied with several interchangeable dies and can automatically strip coax cable, flair the braid and install a number of different compression connectors, F, RCA, etc.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2009
  8. TheatreImage

    TheatreImage Member

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    For the best results... the crimper should match the connector and the connector should match the cable. Also what ever stripper you use it should have a notch in the blade where the center conductor is... Some frequencies are skin frequencies (run on the outside of the conductor) and if the center conductor is nicked or scratched the effectivness of the cable will be degraded.

    One more thing... the connector has to be fitted properly on the cable to maximize the sheilding. If the cable is not in far enough this will alow stray RF into your connection.

    For RF:
    Ripley FX Ultraseal - crimper - F and BNC
    CablePrep CPT-6590 - Stripper RG6

    For Video:
    I only use Canare cable, connectors, prep and crimp tools - in my mind Canare is the best and most durable
     
  9. mnfreelancer

    mnfreelancer Active Member

    Messages:
    198
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    I'm on a personal crusade against the crimp/strip tool shown in the first post, because it is far too thin to effectively crimp any kind of connector. You end up with a very ugly crimp that looks like the connector is mashed, and it is mechanically weak. To properly crimp "hex" style F connectors you should get a tool like this : [media]http://www.sadoun.com/Sat/Order/Install/hy-106e.jpg[/media]. They are not much more expensive but far more effective on a greater range of hex style F connectors.

    I however have jumped on the compression-seal bandwagon. I use a ripley combination compression sealer that will work for a broad range of connector sizes including BNC and some RCA connectors on a variety of coax sizes. The tool is pricey, however, weighing in at around $75. Radial compression fittings maintain better impedance than hex crimp, are a stronger mechanical connection and repel the elements better if you're in a situation where connectors are outdoors (cable TV distribution). I have found that compression equipment is becoming so mainstream that even Home Depot and Lowes are carrying fittings and sealers now at fairly reasonable prices if you're only making occasional cables.

    As for strippers a really cheap coax "ringer" will save you much time and aggravation. I use this one which cost me $8 : [media]http://www.altex.com/Assets/ProductImages/Standard/2cskcatv.jpg[/media]. You can't see in the picture but the blade that strips the inner conductor has a square shaped nick out of it that allows the center conductor to slip into the nick and allow the outer stripper to strip the jacket if the jacket is thicker, making the strip tool more universal through a range of RG-59 and RG-6 including quad shield. Look for strip tools with this simple feature. I will try and get a shot of it if I bring my kit home tonight.
     
  10. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,415
    Likes Received:
    576
    Occupation:
    Screw gun for hire
    Location:
    Chicago
    Thanks everyone this has been great info so far.
     
  11. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,415
    Likes Received:
    576
    Occupation:
    Screw gun for hire
    Location:
    Chicago
    Well, after more research, and the feedback here, this is what I finally settled on.

    I went with a compression crimper. The model I got is made by Datashark, a division of Paladin, and has worked fine for the occasional end that I do. It will crimp F, RCA and BNC ends on RG6, RG6 Quad and RG59, which are quite honestly the cables I've dealt with almost exclusively. Did a few in the apartment yesterday after the cable guy left to send lines to my roommates and I rooms. I figure this unit will be fine for me for now, and unless I need something more specific for a more unique coax type, or should I ever find myself sealing tons of ends on a regular basis. Otherwise, this should be fine for now.
    [​IMG]

    As for a stripper, I went with a Klein model (of course once again showing my bias toward Klein) that has a replaceable stripper cartridge, and that, in addition to allowing for a new blade, also allows for a UTP cartridge to be used instead of a coax stripper.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. mrb

    mrb Active Member

    Messages:
    377
    Likes Received:
    32
    Compression fittings all the way....you can get them in RCA and BNC in addition to F, you can even get them for mini coax.
     
  13. GreyWyvern

    GreyWyvern Apollo Staff

    Messages:
    812
    Likes Received:
    381
    Location:
    Fort Wayne, IN
    I think you made a good choice. Compression fittings are much better for durability and signal quality than crimp fittings.

    Dave
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice