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color conventions for light plots

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by variable, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. variable

    variable Member

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    I'm not able to layer with the program I'm current;y using to redo my show's light plot, so I was wondering if there were any established conventions for assigning a color to instruments, e.g. black=front, green=wash, yellow=tops, etc. I have them all tagged, but I need a quick and dirty way to ID units of a certain category.

    Thanks!
     
  2. notoriousRBG

    notoriousRBG Member

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    Typically, light plots are primarily in black and white. This (A.) This avoids losing critical information if the plotter's color quality is poor, and (B.) It's just the theater standard and some look down upon excessively colorful plots.

    LD Charlie Morrison has some rather beautiful drafting samples on his site http://www.cmlighting.com. He does use some color, but sparingly, and often for unimportant things like linesets/scenery.

    To answer you question more directly, no I don't think there are universal standards should you choose to color code your instruments, so if you go that route make something up and be consistent.
     
  3. variable

    variable Member

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    I was hoping that was the case. Makes my job a little simpler. I have definitely been handed plots where all the non-rep lighting was a different color. FOrtunatelyt no one is going to use this version of the plot but me as I'm my own ME. Thanks.
     
  4. SteveB

    SteveB Well-Known Member

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    B&W. Some colors don't render, yellows as example can be impossible to read. As well the color rendition of the printers can rarely differentiate between an R80 and R83 as example.

    I use Vectorworks and print a plot in color that automatically fills the body of the instrument with the gel number. All text for Channel, Address, Unit Number, fixture body, color, is in B&W. Having a colored plot makes it easier to land color during setup, as well as finding information. It's a general reference tool.
     

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  5. notoriousRBG

    notoriousRBG Member

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    I do sometimes see companies indicate non-rep units/adds in a different color (like red). I prefer to use a thick outline of instruments though with 50% opacity on a lower layer instead–– as again this can be more printer friendly.
     
  6. RonHebbard

    RonHebbard Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    "unimportant things like linesets" HUH? You're making me giggle. If you don't think linesets are important, wait until a crew hangs one of your LX pipes on an incorrect lineset, like possibly three pipes away from where it's supposed to hang, on the wrong side of a traveller, or drop or cyc for example.
    Toodleoo!
    Ron Hebbard.
     
  7. notoriousRBG

    notoriousRBG Member

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    I mean scenic elements. The sort of things that you would include in a lighter lineweight on a light plot.

    Obviously, electrics should be more well defined, and everything should be included on an easy to read lineset schedule.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017
    RonHebbard likes this.

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