Comm system

avkid

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Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
Location
Lakewood, NJ
Ladies and gents, I have a problem to pose: I need a 10 station comm system with six units for permenant install and 4 for semi-mobile(in the back of a SUV)use. The easier and more inexpensive the better!
 

Mayhem

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Premium Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2004
Location
Australia
What range will you require from the base station to those in the SUV?
 

avkid

Not a New User
Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
Location
Lakewood, NJ
the SUV was just to illustrate that they must be compact, wired or wireless doesn't much matter to me.
 

bdesmond

Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2004
Location
Chicago, IL USA
Clearcom and RTS are the two big names here. Clearcom being the big one in theaters, lot of live events usually, and RTS in TV/sporting events. Both vendors and others will be a 1U or 2U rack unit if you even go for something in that form factor. Keep in mind you can daisy chain beltpacks. Clearcom has a little table top sized 3 output single channel. You could easily do both jobs with a pair of these and beltpacks...
 

NickJacques

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
Location
Luxemburg, WI
Looking at my handy Full Compass catalog, I see a viable solution to your problem. This, however will NOT be inexpensive, but will be extremely rugged and dependable.

For wireless: Purchase a Telex BTR300.. it's a VHF base station for up to four (works for you in this case) TR300, which are transceiver units. List price, the BTR300 goes for $2800, and the TR300s are $800 a piece. That's list. Call Full Compass. The actual price will be less.

For wired: Buy a MS2002 from Telex. This is a wired, 2-Channel base station. It includes functions to listen, talk, and call at this station, but the real power is in the: BP1002/BP2002. Depending on what model (1002 or 2002), you have access to only one or both channels. The MS2002 is $1200 list, and the BP1002 is $300 per, while the BP2002 is $400 per. Again, call Full Compass. Their prices are A LOT lower than list prices and other businesses such as Sweetwater. I've checked.

Yes, it is possible to 'bridge' the two systems. This is exactly what is being done at my high school. Almost exactly the same components were installed in my high school in 1991, and everything still works fine. The BTR300 has an "Ext. In" jack on the back which will allow you to connect the hard-line intercom to the wirelesses.

Hope this is of some help; remember - Telex is top-notch!

Nick
 

Mayhem

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Premium Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2004
Location
Australia
Whilst I have never used VHF comms, I have used VHF wireless systems (mic and guitar) and have found them to be susceptible to a lot of interference. I believe that this is the main reason that wireless systems went to UHF frequencies. I just wonder if a VHF comms system would also have this problem?
 

NickJacques

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
Location
Luxemburg, WI
Mayhem said:
Whilst I have never used VHF comms, I have used VHF wireless systems (mic and guitar) and have found them to be susceptible to a lot of interference. I believe that this is the main reason that wireless systems went to UHF frequencies. I just wonder if a VHF comms system would also have this problem?
Interference really isn't a problem. Sure, the transmission quality isn't as great as a hardline, but it's not really bothersome at all. Maybe the reason why interference isn't a problem (for us at least) is because we're a little more rural... there aren't any TV stations being broadcast anywhere close to us, and there is only one radio station around here. That being said, the BTR300 system is really good. The operating length has been tested at our school... one kid made it outside and about halfway through the parking lot before he actually cut out. If you go Telex, you really won't be disappointed. Trust me. :)

Nick
 

Sombra2

Active Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
My school has a two line telex intercome system. It works fine, the hardline is good for when your actually doing the show and sitting in the booth all ready to go. However during prep/setup wireless system is fine. The nice thing about telex is that it semi-cheaper than clear-com and also they sell this accessorie that can link your clear-com and telex system which is good since clear-com has this device that can link with your walkie-talkie system so giving cheaper wireless if your school/company already has a pre-existing system.

Just incase your wondering what I'm talking about:
Clear Com(Two-Way Radio/Walkie-Talkie Interface):http://www.clearcom.com/products/party-line/plinterfaces.html

Telex(Audiocom to Clearcom© Interface):http://www.telex.com/Intercoms/products.nsf/pages/ccb1
 

avkid

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Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
Location
Lakewood, NJ
As cheaply as possible, I am willing to assemble something from a component list and schematic.
 

Mayhem

Senior Team Emeritus
Premium Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2004
Location
Australia
NickJacques said:
Mayhem said:
Whilst I have never used VHF comms, I have used VHF wireless systems (mic and guitar) and have found them to be susceptible to a lot of interference. I believe that this is the main reason that wireless systems went to UHF frequencies. I just wonder if a VHF comms system would also have this problem?
Interference really isn't a problem. Sure, the transmission quality isn't as great as a hardline, but it's not really bothersome at all. Maybe the reason why interference isn't a problem (for us at least) is because we're a little more rural... there aren't any TV stations being broadcast anywhere close to us, and there is only one radio station around here. That being said, the BTR300 system is really good. The operating length has been tested at our school... one kid made it outside and about halfway through the parking lot before he actually cut out. If you go Telex, you really won't be disappointed. Trust me. :)

Nick
Wasn't talking about hardline v's wireless - just the difference in frequencies and interference I have experienced with VHF as opposed to UHF.

Both are wireless.
 

cutlunch

Active Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2005
Location
Auckland, New Zealand
avkid said:
As cheaply as possible, I am willing to assemble something from a component list and schematic.
I don't know if this helps but an Australian company called Altronics sells a kitset stage intercom system. It is based on an article in an Australian Electronics Magazine called "Silicon Chip". The article appeared in the June 1992 issue. You can get back copies of the article from there. This is the Website for them www.siliconchip.com.au

They have two kitsets one is the power supply here's the link to that
http://www.altronics.com.au/index.asp?area=item&id=K5255

You could probably make your own power supply. It only has to supply 30V at a minimum of 1 Amp.

Here's the link to the beltpacks
http://www.altronics.com.au/index.asp?area=item&id=K5250

The beltpack does not include the Headset but they are probably cheaper to buy in the States.


The beltpacks use a four pin XLR for the headset. You may just have to swap the earphone connections around. The line is standard 3 pin XLR. I have used Clearcom specs for the comparison.

Hope this helps.
 

avkid

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Fight Leukemia
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Feb 17, 2004
Location
Lakewood, NJ
all I would need then would be headsets and a voltage converter