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Compressor models

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by Austinro, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. Austinro

    Austinro Member

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    I have been given the go ahead to buy a compressor to be mainly used on the vocals of bad bands that will be playing at an upcoming variety show. This compressor will also probably be used on the microphone for any assemblies. My question: I need a good compressor for around $150.00. If I can get the compressor around that price, I get to get three SM-57's. If there is no decent compressor for that price, I could sacrifice a mike or two. What compressor has the best value for price? It doesn't need to be excellent, but I don't want any clicks or hums.

    Another question along the same lines, what would be the best way to hook up the compressor to the system? Should I use the channel insert, or should I aux send the preamped signal to the input of the compressor and give the output it's own strip? Also, should the compressor go before or after the feedback reduction EQ?
     
  2. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Recent thread covered almost this topic exactly: Compressors-Poll

    The general and overwhelming consensus (as well as my opinion) is the 266XL from DBX. This can be had for $150 from most online music supply retailers.
     
  3. Austinro

    Austinro Member

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    Thank you.
     
  4. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Always glad to be of assistance.

    And I can understand not wanting to give up the purchase of the 57's. My school's budget finally allowed me to get two this year, and they're the best mics that we have (besides the fact that they can be used for so many different things).
     
  5. Austinro

    Austinro Member

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    We have four SM-58's, but no SM 57's. The SM-58's are great for vocals. Another question, how should I hook up the compressor to the system? It will mainly be used for vocals.
     
  6. Eboy87

    Eboy87 Well-Known Member

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    Definitly on the insert for the channel(s)
     
  7. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    Yes. Put it on the insert. If you put it on the main mix, you'll compress the whole mix, which would compress the signals that you don't want compressed.
     
  8. Andy_Leviss

    Andy_Leviss Active Member Premium Member

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    Here's a trick you didn't ask, but that your post reminded me of. In a pinch, if you need a mic for a guitar amp or other situation where you'd use a 57, but only have a 58, just take off the metal ball windscreen. It's obviously much more fragile than a 57, this way (hence why I'd avoid using it for, say, a snare), but the basic EQ difference between a 57 and 58 comes from the windscreen.

    As for how to hook up the compressor, if you just need it on a single mic, insert it on the channel. If for a group of mics, ideally it wants to be insterted on a subgroup. If you don't have subgroups, you can use a group output and then return the input to another channel, but be very careful that you don't route that channel back to the same group or you'll end up with a nasty feedback loop. Compressors are generally only put on main outputs for effect (some rock guys like a bit of system compression, often a tube comp to warm things up a bit), or as limiters to protect systems if somebody who doesn't know better is driving the system.

    --A
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2006
  9. Austinro

    Austinro Member

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    Thanks for the tip about the 57's and 58's. If this is the case, could you hypothetically buy only 57's and then get separate windscreens to put on them? We have an SR34-4, so I do have subgroups. Would it sound alright if I put the main vocals on one compressor channel and the two backup mikes on another?
    Why I'm here, I have another question. I have been told that during this show there is going to be a group playing "A Space Oddity". I have no idea what instruments will be used, but I am fairly sure there will be a tenor sax, electric piano, and the xylophones. I also was told that there will be around eight people doing it. If I only have four mikes, what should I mike? I'm pretty sure the zylophone will be loud enough, and I don't know how many vocalists (if any) will be singing.
    Thanks for the tips,
    Austinro
     
  10. Austinro

    Austinro Member

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    I have another question as well. I know it's a long shot, but is there any way for me to control guitar amps while they are on stage? The auditorium is only 720 seats, so amps are fine for guitars. There is a problem though. These amps (because I can't control them) are always out of volume with the rest of the mix. Usually, it is the bass guitar. Is there a good way for me to be able to control the volume on these amps without having to tell someone else? Right now, I am probably going to have to have someone with a headset go on stage and set the levels. The problem with this is that some of the musicians will turn their amps up after the stagehands have gone off the stage. For this reason, I want to be able to have a master control.
     
  11. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    This answer is presented as purely hypothetical.

    If the amp has an insert, and you have 1/4" lines on your snake, and you have extra channels on your board, and you have an extra buss, this might work, but you'd better have exceedingly good quality cable, or the signal quality will be decreased too much.

    Ok. So, take the send from the insert, run it up to the board, and assign that channel to NOTHING. Don't EQ it, don't do anything. Just send it to the extra buss, and make sure that this is the ONLY thing on this buss, and send the signal from that buss down the line back to the amp. As I said, you'd better hope that you've got REALLY good cable, or else the sound quality could be seriously degraded.

    Alternatively, if you have a very small spare mixer, just do this same thing, but just use that small mixer for the guitar amps, and have the mixer just off stage to one side. This way the sound quality wouldn't be degraded as much because the signal won't have to run through as much cable.
     
  12. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    And about what you should mic...some of the bands/groups that are performing most likely have a mic or two. Ask them to bring some extra mics, and use them to mic everything. (unless, of course, it's loud enough already)
     
  13. mbenonis

    mbenonis Wireless Guy Administrator Premium Member

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    This is a great trick that I've employed a number of times for a very low budget venue we have here at U.Va. (For the curious, it's a dorm lounge where we hold concerts every friday night.)
     

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