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Design Issues and Solutions Concert

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by bestboy, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. bestboy

    bestboy Member

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    Im working on a guitar club concert for my school, and right now im still kind of in the planning stages.

    The board im working on is an ETC express 72/144. anyone know how to clear a cue easily so you can bump lights then bring the cue back up?
    I mean im talking about a matter of seconds.

    I don't want to have to hit clear then bring up the cue again in fear of that will mess up with my smart light and scroller cues.

    Ideas, suggestions?
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Write more cues and write them with zero counts. Take out all the lights except the ML attributes and scrollers in one cue and then restore. then all you have to do if you need to loop that is type Cue X GO. The other way would be to write an inhibitive submaster that controls only your intensity channels, then you can just run the sub when you need to go to black.
     
  3. bestboy

    bestboy Member

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    Im intrigued...

    Inhibitive submaster... would you care to explain that further? I haven't gotten to that point in programming yet.
     
  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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  5. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    I smell a Wiki entry...
     
  6. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    For the edification of those who use consoles other than Express:

    Inhibitive Submaster: Essentially an inhibitive sub is the reverse of a submaster. On most consoles you keep the the fader for the sub UP and it has no effect. When you pull the fader down, the levels of the channels that are in the sub are lowered.

    Inhibits are useful for such things as the OP's situation or any time you may need to selectively pull lights out and be able to restore them. I often program a conventionals inhibit so that if an LD needs to be able to see where any MLs are falling on the stage we can pull down the levels of all the conventionals. Amazingly useful, and a good tool to know how to use and program.
     
  7. Sayen

    Sayen Active Member

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    I keep forgetting how limited my console is. I usually try to achieve the same result with groups programed to macro keys, so I can quickly grab a selection of lights and black them out, including a master blackout.
     
  8. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    What's the most prominent "Inhibitive Submaster" that every board has? (HogIII being the most notable exception.)
     
  9. wfor

    wfor Member

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    Don't forget SUBS can have fade times, just make the dwell time Hold by pressing CLEAR when it asks you for it. Extremely helpful for concert/variety show situations...
     
  10. waynehoskins

    waynehoskins Active Member

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    Two come to mind:
    DBO
    and Power Switch
     

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