Control/Dimming Converting EDI SPI Q-2 dimmer module to constant power

Brad.O

Member
We have a need to convert a few channels of our existing dimmer-per-circuit installation into constant power to support LED and ML loads.

Wondering if anyone has the circuit diagrams for a Q-2 module - we'd likely only be converting 1 of the 4 channels in the module as we want to distribute the constant power outputs to multiple locations along each electric or catwalk.

My understanding is that this conversion is pretty straight forward, and we understand that we'd have to rely on the breaker on the face of the module to perform shutdowns at the end of each day.

I just like to have any info I can lay my hands on before I begin - already added our house and work lights to DMX control via the console while retaining the wall control stations, so this is the next step.

Thanks,
Brad
 

Les

Well-Known Member
Alan Child at EDI Service & Repair is going to be your guy. He was an engineer for EDI before the shutdown and is the most knowledgeable person I'm aware of when it comes to Electronics Diversified gear.

Unfortunately, I can't get to his website – either it's down right now or he stopped doing repairs. Either way, his info still exists online so I'd recommend giving him a shout.

Alan Child
(503) 781-7361
[email protected]

Former(?) web address:
http://www.ediserviceandrepair.info

If you strike out there, try some others on our List of Service and Repair Vendors.
 

derekleffew

Resident Curmudgeon
Senior Team
Premium Member
My understanding is that this conversion is pretty straight forward, and we understand that we'd have to rely on the breaker on the face of the module to perform shutdowns at the end of each day.

I just like to have any info I can lay my hands on before I begin ...
It sounds like you're determined to do this, so I'll tell you...AFTER you've read all/some of the reasons why NOT to do it, including possibly willfully causing death by electrocution and/or burning your venue to the ground.
Three of the many threads discussing this topic:
https://www.controlbooth.com/threads/bypassing-the-choke-on-a-d20.38616
https://www.controlbooth.com/threads/clean-power-for-leds-from-a-original-strand-cd80-rack.38709
https://www.controlbooth.com/threads/convert-dimmer-module-to-non-dim.30322

You don't really need a schematic; it's dead DEAD DEAD simple really. Your quad dimmer module (probably, if not, ignore all this and plug your LEDs into the wall) contains an ssr. Might look similar to this
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There will be four 12 guage-ish wires coming from the circuit breaker s and going to the inputs. There will be four 12 guage-ish wires going from the ssr's outputs to the choke s. There will be some much smaller wires to control the ssr, ignore those. Find the desired input/output wires (may be labeled A, B, C, D), remove them from the ssr and connect them together. How exactly depends on whether they use crimp terminal s or screw terminals. Viola. If, after you've properly LOTO -ed the rack, replaced the altered module, and switched on the breakers on the front, if any trip, you've done it wrong. Turn back off the rack and call a professional.

Again, one more time, just so we're clear, don't do this.
What I have done before to make a dimmer a non-dim outlet is make a jumper that bypasses the powercube/SCR/whatever-name-it-goes-by. The breaker switch on that dimmer module acts as an on/off switch for that specific circuit. This is how I bring clean power to moving lights that are located where it is impossible to run a circuit for it otherwise, such as a truss with a raceway built into it. Also, make sure to label the dimmer that is a non-dim in the dimmer rack!!

Dsotm75,

I'm not trying to call you out directly, but I take great issue with what you are suggesting here. As an ETCP Certified Entertainment Electrician, and a factory authorized field service technician for various manufacturers, I want to emphatically state that an end user should *NEVER* modify a dimmer rack in this manner. The liability and risk of injury or death is too great.

Modifying the dimmer rack can void the dimmer rack warranty, voids UL (or ETL, or whomever), and likely makes you, your venue, and your employers/supervisors responsible for any and all damage this may cause if something fails. You risk, at the least, damage to the dimmer rack and connected devices, and at most, loss of life.

I implore you, if you need power that can't come from a dimmer...install a relay module if you're able to / your rack has that option, or have a licensed electrician help you come up with a safe and viable solution.

Kindest Regards,
Abby

Above re-posted below without quotes so it will stay expanded, and some bolding added...
"
@Dsotm75,

I'm not trying to call you out directly, but I take great issue with what you are suggesting here. As an ETCP Certified Entertainment Electrician, and a factory authorized field service technician for various manufacturers, I want to emphatically state that an end user should *NEVER* modify a dimmer rack in this manner. The liability and risk of injury or death is too great.

Modifying the dimmer rack can void the dimmer rack warranty, voids UL (or ETL, or whomever), and likely makes you, your venue, and your employers/supervisors responsible for any and all damage this may cause if something fails. You risk, at the least, damage to the dimmer rack and connected devices, and at most, loss of life.

I implore you, if you need power that can't come from a dimmer...install a relay module if you're able to / your rack has that option, or have a licensed electrician help you come up with a safe and viable solution.

Kindest Regards,
Abby
"
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
Above is good advice. Modifying the dimmer as suggested definitely makes it non-compliant with the NEC.

It really isn't expensive to have a qualified electrician intercept the same circuits and connect them to another panel.
 

JD

Well-Known Member
There is another problem. The OCPD (breaker) in the circuit has been chosen to meet a certain worst-case fault current. When you remove the SSR and/or choke, you increase the potential worst-case fault current as there is less in the circuit, potentially exceeding the safety ratings of the breaker. Yes, the chances of a problem are slim, but you have shifted the legal responsibility on to yourself.
 

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