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Covering curved surfaces

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by dbaxter, Jan 13, 2017.

  1. dbaxter

    dbaxter Active Member Premium Member

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    What are folks using these days to cover the curved surfaces of a set? I've got a semi-circular alcove with a dome on top all framed up, but struggling to find a good material to make the walls and ceiling out of. I've used foam carpet padding in the past, but this room wants to have smoother walls. The nearest 'wiggle' board' supplier is 450 miles away. Found some 1/8" paper board paneling at Home Depot a couple years ago, but it seems to not be stocked anymore. Thanks.
     
  2. Amiers

    Amiers Well-Known Member

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    Lots of ways to do this.

    How much you willing to spend?

    Is the 30ft rule in effect?

    How big of a curve we talking about?

    This stuff bends pretty decent as long as it doesn't get installed cold Link.

    You could cut up some old luauan into 3 inch strips tack it down and mud it.

    They make 1/4in flex drywall but I doubt you will find that cost effective and in stock, You can take 1/4in normal drywall and wet the back to make it flexible and cut it to land on center of each stud, triangles work best. Here is a quick video I found of what I am talking about.
     
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  3. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Depending on your answers to Amiers questions I might suggest 1/4 or 1/8" masonite. Wetting the back of it can help it bend. But it really does depend on the radii in play.
     
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  4. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    I might call around to some lumber yards and ask for "1/4" bending laminate" it's a pretty common thing it's hard to believe someone in Rochester doesn't carry it.
     
  5. SHCP

    SHCP Active Member

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    I like Thermoply. You need to scuff the surface for it to take paint well, but it is smooth and durable for curves. Home Depot carries it here in the Bay Area.
     
  6. lwinters630

    lwinters630 Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps Ram Board.
     
  7. dbaxter

    dbaxter Active Member Premium Member

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    I should know better than to ask the question without dimensions. It's an arc of 176", the difference in height of the dome is 48". I was able to do 1/4" luan strips for the dome per the videos (after one snap off). The Ram board is a definite possibility. I found some wood flooring underlayment that I'll try too. Themoply is not available "within 100 miles" per the Home Depot web site and if I could find 1/8 masonite in town (but I can't) we'd go with that.

    Thanks everybody for the responses so far. I'll post a picture in the "Hey, I thought we could post pictures..." thread when we're all done.
     
  8. Amiers

    Amiers Well-Known Member

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    Post them in both threads for the future people building domes they don't have to try and find the page later on down the road.
     
  9. josh88

    josh88 Remarkably Tired. Fight Leukemia

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    Curved is a majority of what I do these days. I agree that if you can't get bendy ply, 1/8 inch masonite is the next easily available option. depending on what kind of curve we're talking about, you could use something thicker and slot the back on a table saw so it bends. you could layer up a few layers of laminate, but that would want sanded up on the top layer because paint won't stick to it real well. all depends on how tight of an area you're talking about and what your experience/skills/tools are.
     
  10. MarshallPope

    MarshallPope Well-Known Member

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  11. ChristopherRobinJ

    ChristopherRobinJ Member

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    Use 1/8" luan, if it doesn't bend enough, use a router or circular saw set to *just* under an 1/8" depth and cut out some meat of the luon in parallel strips along the part you want to curve. best done in short distances, but might work for a full wall. Takes a steady hand, and be sure not to cut to deep or it will split when you try to bend it.
     
  12. dbaxter

    dbaxter Active Member Premium Member

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    As promised, here are some pictures of the dome construction. I did try RAM board, thanks for the tip, but it ended up easier to use the plastic sheeting that I show the label for. It was $20/roll. When attaching it to the curved top, I used double sided carpet tape, which allowed me to pull the plastic off and reposition it. That needed to be done a lot to get rid of wrinkles. The plastic is thick and tough enough that painting it was not a problem. The inside strips of luan were then fastened to the outside ones, holding the plastic in sort of a sandwich.
    The show is Steve Martin's Underpants.
     

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  13. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Active Member

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    I'm surprised it took paint, what kind did you use?
     
  14. dbaxter

    dbaxter Active Member Premium Member

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    I was pleasantly surprised as well. We used just plain ol' latex. It didn't flake much either. I mean, if you crinkled up a section, little spots would show, but we painted it after it was mounted so not a problem. Believe me, I did test it first!
     
  15. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Not at all how I would have done it but if it worked and it looked good I say, "Bravo Sir!"
     

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