The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

Curving raked platforms.

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by SweetBennyFenton, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. SweetBennyFenton

    SweetBennyFenton Active Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Portland OR
    Hello all. I'm currently working on a show that will require a curving raked platform and I was wondering if anyone had any experience with them before.

    It's a bit of an "C" curve at about a 15 Deg. rake. The whole thing is about 24 feet long. I can't just build the thing flat and then tilt it because it needs to be level from one side to the other as you walk along it..

    So, long, curving, raked walkway build on a college theatre budget. Anyone?
     
  2. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,850
    Likes Received:
    46
    I wasn't quite clear what you meant, so I made this quickly. Is this what you are talking about?

    Edit: I'm a terrible carp, so I'd wait for Van's advice. However, why couldn't you great it flat first then tilt it? I don't follow the but about "must be level from one side to the other. You mean SL to SR? If you make it, then add the angled sections last, cut to fit, then the vertical supports?
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2008
  3. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    9,435
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Ya... more info would be good. If you have a router, this really will not be that hard. Just did a show with a rake that the high point was DS that was very oddles shaped, I have a few ideas that work..
     
  4. Traitor800

    Traitor800 Active Member

    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Lititz, PA
    The easiest way to do that would probably be to make a gated rake, where basically you lay out stud walls for your rake and then drop plywood that is cut to shape ontop of. by doing that you can create almost any shape rake that you want.
     
  5. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    9,435
    Likes Received:
    1,834
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    If... your deck is strong enough. Doing stud wall legs works extremely well with triscuits or doubled up 3/4 ply in alternate directions. With single sheet your going to get a deck that will deflect a pretty good amount, unless you put in supports just like a standard 4x8.
     
  6. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,570
    Likes Received:
    2,581
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    I"m not sure why you can't build it flat and tip it up. As long as your bracing is correctly placed it'll be level from side to side.
     
  7. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,830
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    "You keep using that word,I don't think that word means what you think it means."

    You lost me, It's on a rake but it's level? Does the open part of the "C" point downstage?
     
  8. SweetBennyFenton

    SweetBennyFenton Active Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Portland OR
    The open part of the "C" is downstage and faces a bit tward center.

    It's hard to describe, I'll post a picture when I get it in CAD.

    If I built it flat, then tipped it up, the ends of the "C" would not be raked in the direction of the curve, but just tward center stage.

    Basicly, the platform needs to twist as it curves so that the rake will only take you down the ramp, not off one of the sides.

    Again, I'll try to get a picture up when I can.
     
  9. What Rigger?

    What Rigger? I'm so fly....I Neverland.

    Messages:
    1,096
    Likes Received:
    498
    Occupation:
    Polishing the brass on the Titanic.
    Location:
    Not at home, that's for sure.
    This almost looks/sounds to me like you need Thrasher magazine's skate ramp how-to book. Lotta weird sh*t in there.

    thrashermagazine.com
     
  10. jonhirsh

    jonhirsh Active Member

    Messages:
    837
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario and Valencia, California
    Sounds like a compound rake. Tricky stuff.

    jh
     
  11. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,830
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    Aha! I think you want to build itt like an over pass, except without the bank to compensate for centipital force. Layout in Acad,V-works, the total length of the platform, as if it were in a straight line. Take measures every 18 inches and build ponywalls / kneewalls to those heights. Lay out the curve, in chalk on you deck. Posistion your poniesmaintaining the 18" O.C.. The fun part is going to be placing the Plywood cover. I would suggest starting with a 1/4" piece of plywood, not luan just good old fir. I'd then lay a 1/2" on top of that then either a 3/4" if you need it or another 1/2". The Plys is going to want to twist, which is why you need a thin layer at the bottom. The most difficult thing I see is the total amount of ply used. it may be considerable, depending on the sweep and width of the "c" . You could just build the whole thing up using 1/4" but that is going to take a lot of glue and staples.

    What show are they starting with over there?
     
  12. SweetBennyFenton

    SweetBennyFenton Active Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Portland OR
    Yeah Van. You've got it.
    Here's the pictures I promised. First a front view then one of it in the space in 3D view. The posts you see are the scaffolding uprights that will hold this thing in the air.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    It may just take layer after layer of 1/2" ply if it can take the twisting.
     
  13. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,570
    Likes Received:
    2,581
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    OHHHH... That's what you want. Yeah it doesn't seem that hard to me as long as you do it in layers. I think 3/4" might be a little too thick, think I'd stay with 1/2" and I like the idea of starting with a layer of 1/4" first.
     
  14. SweetBennyFenton

    SweetBennyFenton Active Member

    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Portland OR
    Yeah... I just came up with a plan for layout. Now I have to figure out how to build it in pieces. Won't be able to install that bad boy in one piece.
     
  15. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,570
    Likes Received:
    2,581
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    I think I would take a sheet of 1/2" and clamp it to a table on one end. Then go around to the other end and give it a bit of a lift and a twist. Try to see how much of it you can put some bend into without a lot of strain... and make that the maximum size of your piece.
     
  16. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    5,830
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
    Location:
    Portland, Or.
    You could do layers and layers of "wiggle board". Oh wait, you're on a budget. ...... four layers of 1/4" with glue inbetween is just as strong as a layer of 3/4" With the torsional load of the twist on it it might even be a bit stronger/rigid.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice