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Do a little dance... wait no I mean jig.

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by Radman, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    Just curious how many of you out there are tempted to make some form of jig jig any time you are doing repetitive work, such as say making fifty identical foam bricks, or 23 sconces? Or how about drilling the same holes into different pieces? I personally find myself wanting to make a jig for about half the work I do. I feel it really helps the quality of the workmanship. That said, I usually don't.
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I jig out everything... whenever im doing steel work nothing gets welding enless it gets put in a jig, if im cutting more then 5 of anything i set a jig... whenever we build flats (mostly hollywood out of 1x3) they are made in a jig... if you jig everything odds are that everyting will come out square and true... that being said as long as the jig is made well...
     
  3. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I have a jig for making floor stands into which I drop the cut lengths of steel before welding. I also have templates speaker box and roadcase hardware and for most panel mounted or non-round sockets etc that I use.
     
  4. Kelite

    Kelite Apollo Staff Premium Member

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    <that being said as long as the jig is made well...>

    Amen! You've gotta have it square to come out square!

    2x4's and other dimensional lumber are great for knocking out a quick jig for multi- set pieces. The trick is getting to the point where these can be found in the same spot for re-use. Yikes!

    :dance:
     
  5. nez

    nez Member

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    here here repetatie works sucks and yea i know puts some music on and do a little dance ahahha
     
  6. soundman

    soundman Well-Known Member

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    At the shop there are three jigs we would not get by with out. The coffin lock jig that slips over the 2* and let you router out both part of the hole. The 2nd being the coffin lock jig that goes on the plywood to drill the holes out. Third is the lap joint jig.
     
  7. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    One thing I jigged that made work zoom by was just screwing in a block on the bench so i could butt the foam i was cutting up against it after each new cut and have it perfectly square and the right length in a second's time. No need to measure, mark, anything. Just zip zip zip for a few minutes and boom, 50 bricks knocked out.
     
  8. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Works for timber too. and if you don't want something so permanent, cramp the block rather than screwing it. Similarly, don't we tend to mark out a distance on the bench, the floor or some other place when making cables so that we don't have to measure each one.
     
  9. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    Definitely, I was just using that as an example. And I screw something like that in if its gonna be used for a large number of things, after constant butting, clamps can slip itsy bits.
     
  10. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I was recently drilling floor bases for our PAR-38 striplights to be used as groundrow-level cyc lighting. I drilled one, and then put that on top of the next one...and the next one...and the next one, drilling each the same way. This ensured consistency, and mean that I didn't have to go back and check each individual floor base against the next.
     
  11. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Good point. I have 100mm increments marked on the edge of one work bench (0-1200) and on the other I have the wire lengths for various plugs and sockets marked out, so that I know the length of jacket to remove and then the amount to trim off each individual wire (if at all). Saves a heap of time.
     
  12. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Are not the manufacturers of such items helping us out by providing such lengths on the back of the packet? Though it is much quicker to use a bench marking I have to agree.
     
  13. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Clipsal are very good with their 438 and 439 plugs and sockets but when you buy stackers loose and by the box, there are no markings and they are the real pain as each wire has to be trimmed to a different length. We are really lucky in that the standard single and three phase plugs and sockets are a case of simply stripping back the jacket. I am pretty sure (and someone correct me here) that a number of the US plugs and sockets require individual wire lengths.

    Also, plugs get recycled a lot as well.

    Audio connectors I buy generally come bulk and without instructions.
     
  14. Chris15

    Chris15 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    All True, the only thing being that in theory at least, the new Clipsal piggybacks [can't remember the part no.] are non rewireable and whilst many people do, you actually aren't meant to trim the earth wire. Its meant to act as a safety, last wire to disconnect under strain.
     
  15. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Jigs... Oh so nice once done well.

    Always clearly label what it's for and date it.

    A wall of jigs for what you often do is better than something quickly done that gets a little more slack each time you use it in tolerance.
     

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