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Dressing Cable?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by derekleffew, Dec 22, 2007.

?

What do you prefer?

  1. Gaffer's Tape

    8.3%
  2. Electrical Tape

    8.3%
  3. Zip Ties

    7.1%
  4. Tieline

    68.6%
  5. Velcro Ties

    1.9%
  6. No mechanical fasteners, just let it hang sloppy, use gravity, wrap the cable around the pipe.

    3.8%
  7. Other (please specify)...

    1.9%
  1. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    What do you prefer to use to dress (affix) cable to a horizontal lighting position (pipe, batten, or truss)?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2007
  2. soundlight

    soundlight Well-Known Member

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    I voted Tie Line because I use that for everything at both places where I work at school, but if I'm buiilding a rig that's gonna be used over and over again (wiring a truss that will be carried from place to place pre-wired, for example), I use my endless supply of Zipties.
     
  3. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Tieline, 2 cubits in length (or more as needed), always. Tape would be too much of a hassle to undo. Two wraps around with a bow knot.
     
  4. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    How do you feel about those *cough*riggers*cough* who insist on a clove hitch, then finish with a bow knot?
     
  5. soundman

    soundman Well-Known Member

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    Tie line for anything that is not going to get set up again. E tape for anything that has to 'tour' even if that means just going down the road. That way there is no confusion to what cables need to get struck and what ones can ride with the set peice or truss.
     
  6. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    I love reusable Zip-Ties.
     
  7. David Ashton

    David Ashton Active Member

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    I use mainly re-usable cable-ties, which I assume are zip ties.
    This avoids the waste of time and money associated with gaffer tape.
     
  8. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I want to take them out back and shoot them. Kinda like the guy that ties opera knots everywhere.
     
  9. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Again, lost.

    Please explain?

    (I should pick-up a knot book...)

    Edit: Doesn't the backstage handbook have a knot section? I should read that...
     
  10. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Opera knots are a kind of clove hitch that are used for tie-ing drops to battens. If you are in a very large house (30' to 50' trims) it is suggested you use opera knots on all of your drops because they hold better. Also, if you are flying your goods very fast you should use them. I am pretty sure the opera knot is in the backstage handbook. Many peopl will tie an opera knot at center and the offstage edge of all drops.
     
  11. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    The opera knot is not in the Backstage Handbook, at least I couldn't find it. I have always been of the belief that it's used to hide the batten, so that the top of the webbing is on the same level as the top of the pipe, as opposed to hanging below the pipe with the normal "shoelace knot."

    To me, an opera knot (also called "V" knot, or "vajayjay knot" (See Oprah, The View, or Grey's Anatomy, and I hate that I know that) is: place the webbing of the drape at the top of the batten, take the two legs of the tieline over the batten and bring each up on either side of the two, between the pipe and the webbing, sort of forming a "V," tie an overhand knot at the webbing, then a bow, just like a shoelace. It's difficult to explain or visualize.

    I'm thinking Footer and I are referring to two different knots, both called "Opera Knot."
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2007
  12. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps you are thinking of the Oprah Knot?

    Thanks for your input though, Derek. I will definitely be checking the Backstage Handbook though.
     
  13. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    charcoaldabs, please do check the Backstage Handbook. In the Index, you'll find:
    opera netting, p. 142
    operating gallery, p. 265
    operating line, p. 265

    No Opera or Oprah Knots anywhere. Do they call it an Opry Knot in Nashville?:) Do we have anyone from Nashville, TN, on here?
     
  14. cutlunch

    cutlunch Active Member

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    Although I haven't used them for a while my favourite is the inner tubing and dowling method.
     
  15. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    There are only a few basic knots in the Hand Book. Check out this site to learn some basic knots.

    As for the question of the thread, I've always used Tie Line. However for the new theater I've ordered a bunch of these from Rip-tie. My theory is strategically placed around the catwalks, I'll always have a Velcro strap nearby... cutting back on the amount of tie line I'll need. I'm going to run a zip tie through that mounting hole to make them easy to reposition if I feel the need.
     
  16. Sean

    Sean Active Member

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    I'm one of those guys.

    When you might end up in a situation where someone has to walk a batten, or trussing, etc, possibly in the (nearly) dark. The last thing you need is a cable bundle giving way as you step on it.

    It doesn't take that much more energy to tie or untie. It's more secure. And hey, when you're running multiple pieces of mult in a bundle, it's easier to tie to the pipe by yourself.

    I'm not talking about "one night" type shows here. When I put in a show at work, it stays there for ~2-3 months.

    --Sean
     
  17. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    It is funny that you mention the expense of tieline. The scene shop in my theatre only uses black tieline for situations where it might be seen. Other than that they only use jute. Why? It is cheaper to buy Jute. So, before I started working here the electricians also used jute. This seemed like a fundamental flaw. The Jute could really only handle being tied once or maybe twice, meaning that in general every piece of jute had to be replaced every other show.

    So, for $99 I buy a 1000yd roll of black tieline and as long as you pay attention and save the pieces as to take things down it will last a very long time. So far this season we have cut tieline off the roll once at the top of the season, and ave not needed to touch the roll since. Seems to me that my way is more economical, though I have not priced out the jute for comparison, just by the number of rolls that the shop uses and the amount of waste generated I would imagine I come out on top.
     
  18. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    Voted for velcro because there's always one on the cable, but we typically use e-tape for the rest. I think it's faster & cheaper than tie line.
     
  19. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    I'm a Clove Hitch person too. For the same reasons as Sean.
     
  20. wolf825

    wolf825 Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Yes what you describe is an Opera Knot...used to hide battons but also when drops and fly space is limited.. It ensures the drop does not sag or is tied loose ..ties it real tight not uneven on a batton.
    As I understand from an old tour guy (older than me) where the term came from--it was a knot originally used in Opera Houses in Europe--many tours would tie on their legs and drops over house goods--so the house would tie their goods with the opera knot and the tour goods with a regular overhand knot--when they would go to pull the ties it was easier to distinguish. Additionally--many opera houses are tall in fly space cause many operas have very tall drops--and sometimes every inch counted to hide the battons on some shorter drops... least that is what I was told once... Whether its right or not for the history of it--don't know....I know how to tie em...I like it for securely tieing things that get a lot of play and I know they won't move or come undone (snow bags, house legs which may get tugged on or hung on etc). holds the weight real well...


    These are a fun toy too since folks are asking how others secure stuff to battons...these are a carry over from Grips and movie/film work... Called "Matth Ties"--yes two "T's"... from Matthews Studio Equipment...they are finding their way into theater and production for doing things like west-coasting drops and hanging temp stuff etc etc... Basically its a plastic clip and a 2' piece of tieline (but it can be any length...)( you feed it thru the hole and pull back and it snaps the tie line into a lock and thats it... pretty cool toy...


    http://www.productionadvantageonline.com/Rope-Tie-Line/B6090.aspx


    http://www.filmtools.com/ma12.html

    -w
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2007

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