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Drummer enclosure

Discussion in 'Sound, Music, and Intercom' started by David Ashton, Jan 19, 2008.

  1. David Ashton

    David Ashton Active Member

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    Occupation:
    truck driver
    Location:
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    Can anyone tell me the technical term for the perspex enclosure round a drummer.I need one but would like to get some ideas about what is best.So if I Google the right phrase it might help.
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Drum Shield. Usually, they are 2'x4' piece of plexy glass hinged to another piece, usually they come in 2 panel and 4 panel models. Home built, I would make 2, 2 panel sections.
     
  3. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Occupation:
    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
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    For the sake of Humanity I prefer the use of an "air-tight box" when dealing with drummers, but the ASPCA frowns on that practice.
    :rolleyes:

    I do, however, know how to tell when a drum platform is level,
    Drool comes out both sides of the drummers mouth.
    and I know the difference between a drummer and a peperoni pizza.
    :twisted::mrgreen::twisted:
     
  4. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    I know so many drummer jokes but unfortunately most of them are too raw to put on this site.

    Whats got three legs with an idiot on top.

    A drum stool.

    What do you get if you cross a roadie with a drummer.

    A dumber roadie.

    On the other had just a few days ago I was driving along behind a car with the sticker "Like many Musicians you are following a drummer."
     
  5. Dillon

    Dillon Active Member

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    check out Clearsonic.com. In my opinion, they make the best stuff out there for enclosures.
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Did you let someone get infront of you so you didn't have to follow?
     
  7. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Yes very quickly.
     
  8. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    Make sure you really want one of those drum shields. In use they can have good and bad results. It all depends on the what you want to accomplish, and how loud the drummer is. Problem is it obviously provides a reflective surface for the drums, and so you need to be careful how you mic the drums, most of the very effective systems have a "roof" over the top but that looks silly in a live environment. If you can determine what element of the drums is the problem, The shields do a lot to reduce cymbals, somewhat effective on high hat, snake and toms not much help on bass. In some cases a low shield around the drum kit that is absorbing but of course not transparent, is more effective. In my experience they have mixed results in a live environment. Many times the problem is the drummer can not hear themselves so they keep playing louder and louder, so a monitor feed that has the drums emphasised in headphones works better. In addition putting the drummer up on a riser also helps, especially if it is set back a bit from the musicians on the front of the stage.

    Anyway drums are the most problematic part of live performances in a number of cases

    Sharyn
     
  9. museav

    museav CBMod CB Mods Departed Member

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    Occupation:
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    ClearSonic (http://www.clearsonic.com/IsoPacs.htm) is sort of the standard for drum shields or drum booths, but also take a look at this, http://www.perdueacoustics.com/drum_booth_kit.html.

    These are indeed not always a perfect solution, but if you have a drummer that can/will not learn to play in any way other than imitating Animal of the Muppets and that has to work with others on stage, then it is often the only practical choice other than electronic drums.
     
  10. SHARYNF

    SHARYNF Well-Known Member

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    Notice on Brad's suggested solution the acoustic absorption panels on the lower sections, this should make for a better performing solution

    Sharyn
     
  11. musictom

    musictom Member

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    I concur also with the use of Clearsonic. However, the critical element, as sharyn states, is to get the acoustic absorbtion panels, both on the lower section, and, depending on where your drums are, behind the drum set as well. We started off with the drum shields (pretty acoustically live church), and all they did was provide one more reflection, before bouncing everywhere. We added the absorption panels behind, and eventually put them on top. We're now able to mic the drum kit, and have a pretty solid mix, not to mention much less acoustic leakage.
     

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