Effectively using Rosco equip....

Charc

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Feb 14, 2007
Sorry for the vague title. Let me try to explain what I mean. I've very involved with lighting at my school. Unfortunately, know one has/will teach me anything about design. So everything I do is lackluster. Anyways. I went into tech. storage and stumbled across a rosco rotator, and slide projector.
The rotator, I believe, is the cheaper one that spins two gobos in opposite directions, at the same speed. So I thought: "This is cool, wait, what do I do with it?". So that's my question for you guys. If you want to point me towards any comprehensive literature, or don't mind outlining some of the basics, it'd be much appreciated. I know gobo rotators are great for creating some specific effects, but I don't know how to make 'em. Now, I believe this unit goes into the normal gobo slot, correct? I have to admit, I'm quite dismayed that it can only rotate two at the same time. As opposed to one rotating, and one static. From my understanding, a rotating prismatic or glass gobo, coupled with a static steel, creates great effects. (Wait, if this fits into the normal gobo slot, then can glass / prismatics fit?) So I'd like some suggestions on what to do with that.
Next up is the rosco slide projector. Looks: pretty freaking sweet. I do have a couple questions for it though. I believe the slide kit we had, is since MIA. So I'd have to buy a new one of those. Are they reusable, or one time use? How successful is printing this off from a standard home inkjet printer? considering it's only 40 ish dollars to order a custom one from rosco, is that a better option? Also, how sharp is the picture? I remember now that this was used once. And the image wasn't all that great. It was out of a 19deg S4 at the back of the house. It seems like that is the only spot to place the instrument, as I sure as hell don't know how to keystone an image. Any suggestions here?
I also considering get a custom gobo from rosco. Cost dependent. I've read the literature on all the above, but it's all seemed to be incomplete. Same with the gobos. For price, rosco lists "inexpensive, moderate, expensive". I'd be interested in a spectragobo. Does anyone know around how much that'll run me? One more question. All these custom things say "not for use in instruments over 600 watts". I thought all S4s used 575 watt lamps. However, all (five) of the S4s at school say "750" on the side. Does that mean they have 750 watt lamps?
Thanks guys, Charlie
 

gafftaper

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In general to get you started with some lighting theory go buy: Designing with light by Michael Gillette. You can pick up a book was recently updated and some of the gear info is out of date but what you want is the theory. Which hasn't changed... By all means if you've got the cash get the new $65 [URL='http://www.amazon.com/dp/0073514152/?tag=controlbooth-20" target="_blank" class="link link--external link-http" rel="noopener">5th edition (they've added a 100 pages of new content). This book is a standard text book in a lot of intro to light design classes. It'll give you a lot of good theory to start you out.

MattM posted a link to this a while back. It's a gobo visualizing program he created. It's very cool and should help you see what you can do with your rotator.
http://design.cablepick.com/gobo

As for the slide projector is it a Rosco [autolink]Image[/autolink] Pro? See picture below.
 

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NABster07

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Apr 29, 2006
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Maine
As far as the 750 on the side of the instrument, that doesn't mean that they have 750 lamps on them. A source 4 is rated for up to 750 watts. We personally use 575w lamps most of the time, but for some of the longer throws we use a 750 because of the light lost over the throw.
 

Les

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The gobo rotator should fit in the accessory slot of the Source Four. The slot is located in front of the gobo slot and is covered by a sliding cover held on by 2 Phillips screws. (I think they're still Phillips). The Source Four's you have are 750w. (You're right that the old ones were rated to only 575w.) I would check with Rosco to see if this will still work. They may have since revised their slides to work in these higher wattage fixtures. If not, you could always lamp back down to 575 for this application. I have never used the ImagePro, but I don't think you can keystone it.

Hope this helps!
 

Charc

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Feb 14, 2007
The gobo rotator should fit in the accessory slot of the Source Four. The slot is located in front of the gobo slot and is covered by a sliding cover held on by 2 Phillips screws. (I think they're still Phillips). The Source Four's you have are 750w. (You're right that the old ones were rated to only 575w.) I would check with Rosco to see if this will still work. They may have since revised their slides to work in these higher wattage fixtures. If not, you could always lamp back down to 575 for this application. I have never used the ImagePro, but I don't think you can keystone it.
Hope this helps!
Haha, I'm not that stupid (Disclaimer: previous statement may not be true.) Of course you can't keystone the imagepro, but you keystone the image you put into the imagepro, right? Like if you couldn't keystone a projector, but you keystoned the video you played on the projector?
 

Les

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DFW, Tx.
Like skew the image itself before it goes into the projector? In theory, yes, but it would still have focusing issues if the source was offset from the target.
 

Charc

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Feb 14, 2007
Like skew the image itself before it goes into the projector? In theory, yes, but it would still have focusing issues if the source was offset from the target.
Yep. That's why I'd place it in one spot in the back of the house. We have lighting pipes in the house, along with our catwalks. Kinda weird, and I'm always worried some little kid is gonna touch a 1,000 watt ellipsoidal, but so far no problems...
 

gafftaper

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Back to the I-pro. I don't have one but am really excited about getting one soon. You can purchase full color "slides" from Rosco that fit or print your own using an ink jet printer and their special kit. I think the kit only runs around $35.
Here is the link to Rosco I-pro Tech support page with all the data you will need on how to use it.

As far as wattage in the S4. It's very common to be running 575 Watt lamps even though they are now rated at 750. So you'll have to check the lamp itself.
 

chslighttech

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Location
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We currently have two ipro projectors in our inventory. We use them on strand sl 36 degree though. I just noticed there isnt a degree symbol on my keyboard? well thats besides the point. We print our own and they turn out really good. I think if you read on their website that if you order from Rosco they just last a little bit longer but to us it really doesnt matter. If your making them yourself once you put them together you cannot reuse them. You have to make a new slide. Hope that helped
 

icewolf08

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Lets go back to your gobo rotator. Using it really depends on what kind of effect you want to create. And you can have a rotating and static gobo, as all you have to do is put the gobo you want rotated in the rotator, and the static gobo in a regular gobo holder and in the gobo slot (since the rotator goes in the accessory slot.

Say you want to do a water reflection effect. I would put a static gobo of ripples, and rotate a pattern that is an organic, but relatively linear breakup. Fuzz the focus a little and viola, reflected ripples. Experiment with it, you will find it quite interesting. You may also find that you like sing split color gels for such effects, usually created by cutting the gel on the diagonal and connecting it with a second color that augments your effect, like a blue and turquoise for water.
 

Charc

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Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Lets go back to your gobo rotator. Using it really depends on what kind of effect you want to create. And you can have a rotating and static gobo, as all you have to do is put the gobo you want rotated in the rotator, and the static gobo in a regular gobo holder and in the gobo slot (since the rotator goes in the accessory slot.
Say you want to do a water reflection effect. I would put a static gobo of ripples, and rotate a pattern that is an organic, but relatively linear breakup. Fuzz the focus a little and viola, reflected ripples. Experiment with it, you will find it quite interesting. You may also find that you like sing split color gels for such effects, usually created by cutting the gel on the diagonal and connecting it with a second color that augments your effect, like a blue and turquoise for water.
Now that I know there is an accessory slot, and therefore a static gobo option, I've got much more to think about. Can the accessory slot, and gobo rotator accept colorizers/prismatics?
 

gafftaper

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Colorizers and Prismatics should fit in most standard rotators. So, it kind of depends on what you've got. Got any model numbers or anything like that so we can determine exactly what you have?

The Iris or accessory slot is the only place you can use any of the thick patterns like colorizers or prismatics. Rosco makes a special type of pattern holder just for them, they cost about $15. See picture below.
 

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Charc

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Feb 14, 2007
Colorizers and Prismatics should fit in most standard rotators. So, it kind of depends on what you've got. Got any model numbers or anything like that so we can determine exactly what you have?
The Iris or accessory slot is the only place you can use any of the thick patterns like colorizers or prismatics. Rosco makes a special type of pattern holder just for them, they cost about $15. See picture below.
 

Lightingguy32

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May 2, 2006
Location
New York
Sorry for the vague title. Let me try to explain what I mean. I've very involved with lighting at my school. Unfortunately, know one has/will teach me anything about design. So everything I do is lackluster. Anyways. I went into tech. storage and stumbled across a rosco rotator, and slide projector.
The rotator, I believe, is the cheaper one that spins two gobos in opposite directions, at the same speed. So I thought: "This is cool, wait, what do I do with it?". So that's my question for you guys. If you want to point me towards any comprehensive literature, or don't mind outlining some of the basics, it'd be much appreciated. I know gobo rotators are great for creating some specific effects, but I don't know how to make 'em. Now, I believe this unit goes into the normal gobo slot, correct? I have to admit, I'm quite dismayed that it can only rotate two at the same time. As opposed to one rotating, and one static. From my understanding, a rotating prismatic or glass gobo, coupled with a static steel, creates great effects. (Wait, if this fits into the normal gobo slot, then can glass / prismatics fit?) So I'd like some suggestions on what to do with that.
Next up is the rosco slide projector. Looks: pretty freaking sweet. I do have a couple questions for it though. I believe the slide kit we had, is since MIA. So I'd have to buy a new one of those. Are they reusable, or one time use? How successful is printing this off from a standard home inkjet printer? considering it's only 40 ish dollars to order a custom one from rosco, is that a better option? Also, how sharp is the picture? I remember now that this was used once. And the image wasn't all that great. It was out of a 19deg S4 at the back of the house. It seems like that is the only spot to place the instrument, as I sure as hell don't know how to keystone an image. Any suggestions here?
I also considering get a custom gobo from rosco. Cost dependent. I've read the literature on all the above, but it's all seemed to be incomplete. Same with the gobos. For price, rosco lists "inexpensive, moderate, expensive". I'd be interested in a spectragobo. Does anyone know around how much that'll run me? One more question. All these custom things say "not for use in instruments over 600 watts". I thought all S4s used 575 watt lamps. However, all (five) of the S4s at school say "750" on the side. Does that mean they have 750 watt lamps?
Thanks guys, Charlie
It does not necessarily mean 750 watt lamp, that is just the maximum wattage rating on those Source fours. Most likely they are being lamped at 575, but check any ways to make sure.
 

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