Faux Brick on Flat

Cineruss

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Joined
Sep 15, 2019
Location
Los angeles, ca
I may be crazy here but would like some advice from all of you in the know out there. I have a God awful looking flat with an arch (I didnt make) that will eventually have brick applied to it for show. I know how to create faux brick and all but in this case will not be either painting brick, using styrofoam, or using brick paneling as the size is prohibitive for budget (2- 12' x 10' flats).

So call me crazy but I am considering the old masking tape to mask spaces between bricks routine, applying joint compound and then painting to get the brick look and texturing. Of course doing this means that the entire surface would have to be sanded off after the production to go back to a smooth flat surface again.

However, these flats had pits and valleys all over them anyways and not that smooth. I will talk to the owner to see if this would be a problem for him but just curious on anyone's thoughts along this line and maybe easy cleanup after the production. It looks dang good though from some tests I have done.
 

RonHebbard

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Premium Member
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Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
I may be crazy here but would like some advice from all of you in the know out there. I have a God awful looking flat with an arch (I didnt make) that will eventually have brick applied to it for show. I know how to create faux brick and all but in this case will not be either painting brick, using styrofoam, or using brick paneling as the size is prohibitive for budget (2- 12' x 10' flats).

So call me crazy but I am considering the old masking tape to mask spaces between bricks routine, applying joint compound and then painting to get the brick look and texturing. Of course doing this means that the entire surface would have to be sanded off after the production to go back to a smooth flat surface again.

However, these flats had pits and valleys all over them anyways and not that smooth. I will talk to the owner to see if this would be a problem for him but just curious on anyone's thoughts along this line and maybe easy cleanup after the production. It looks dang good though from some tests I have done.
@Cineruss What are the flats covered with, thin cloth, muslin, luan, Meso'?
At some point, your labor's worth more than the cost of re-skinning the flats, salvage the frames and re-skin the faces.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 
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Van

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Location
Portland, Or.
I would second @sk8rsdad . Cut a brick out of 1/2" homosote. Split it with a machete. glue it to the flat and paint it. It's an excellent look for Brick. Your time and energy applying and then removing that much drywall mud is worth more that a couple sheets of Luan.
 
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RonHebbard

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Waterdown, ON, CA
I would second @sk8rsdad . Cut a brick out of 1/2" homosote. Split it with a machete. glue it to the flat and paint it. It's an excellent look for Brick. Your time and energy applying and then removing that much drywall mud is worth more that a couple sheets of Luan.
@Cineruss Ripping Homosote on your table saw creates a dust storm in short order, wearing a decent mask is HIGHLY recommended.
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 

Colin

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Jan 23, 2015
Location
Eastern Massachusetts
Yes, split Homasote. Yes, big dust storm when cutting unless you've got an unusually capable dust collection system - if I'm doing a lot that's a day I bring my little jobsite table saw and do it outside. Excellent (if labor intensive) brick. I build myself a jig to hold the cut-to-size pieces on edge for splitting by a sharp and stiff putty or taping knife, but I like Van's machete version. Sucks up a ton of paint, which I sort of like in terms of paint effects it allows, but starting with a sealer isn't a bad plan to save some paint and time. It can be nice to do dimensional mortar with the scenic goop of your choice, but also looks pretty solid with just mortar color rolled and spattered on the flat cover prior to applying the bricks.
 

Van

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Jul 27, 2006
Location
Portland, Or.
Yes, split Homosote. Yes, big dust storm when cutting unless you've got an unusually capable dust collection system - if I'm doing a lot that's a day I bring my little jobsite table saw and do it outside. Excellent (if labor intensive) brick. I build myself a jig to hold the cut-to-size pieces on edge for splitting by a sharp and stiff putty or taping knife, but I like Van's machete version. Sucks up a ton of paint, which I sort of like in terms of paint effects it allows, but starting with a sealer isn't a bad plan to save some paint and time. It can be nice to do dimensional mortar with the scenic goop of your choice, but also looks pretty solid with just mortar color rolled and spattered on the flat cover prior to applying the bricks.
I built a machine out of a Machete, A few pieces of Angle and a spring. The Machete was bolted to a pivot point. One piece of angle was welded a 1/4" off the center-line of the Machete, the other angle was bolted on a pivot with a spring attached. you pulled open the angle, slid in the piece of homosote, brought the machete down like a guillotine paper slicer and Boom, You had to homosote bricks. I'll look for pictures.
 

lwinters630

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Joined
May 12, 2011
Location
west of Chicago
I may be crazy here but would like some advice from all of you in the know out there. I have a God awful looking flat with an arch (I didnt make) that will eventually have brick applied to it for show. I know how to create faux brick and all but in this case will not be either painting brick, using styrofoam, or using brick paneling as the size is prohibitive for budget (2- 12' x 10' flats).

So call me crazy but I am considering the old masking tape to mask spaces between bricks routine, applying joint compound and then painting to get the brick look and texturing. Of course doing this means that the entire surface would have to be sanded off after the production to go back to a smooth flat surface again.

However, these flats had pits and valleys all over them anyways and not that smooth. I will talk to the owner to see if this would be a problem for him but just curious on anyone's thoughts along this line and maybe easy cleanup after the production. It looks dang good though from some tests I have done.
I have done the tape and drywall compound. Taping time consuming.
Resanding is a dust storm.
Other options is to cut a template from rubber shower liner or pond liner to mask mortor lines. Skim that with a mix of drywall compound and paint leaving it ruff. add highlights and shade.
 

Cineruss

Active Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2019
Location
Los angeles, ca
I have done the tape and drywall compound. Taping time consuming.
Resanding is a dust storm.
Other options is to cut a template from rubber shower liner or pond liner to mask mortor lines. Skim that with a mix of drywall compound and paint leaving it ruff. add highlights and shade.
Glad to know someone else did it. I am going to go for it. Maybe after the play will try to chisel most of it off before sanding but wil definitely leave a smoother surface.
 

RonHebbard

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Premium Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Location
Waterdown, ON, CA
:):)
They are covered with luan but there must be a good 20 layers of paint over them from previous shows
@Cineruss Think how much lighter they'd be with the old luan stripped and a new luan face applied; good for another twenty layers. It reads as if you've got your money's worth from their present front faces, maybe their faces could use a new smile. :)
Toodleoo!
Ron Hebbard
 
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