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Faux Flame for Portable Stove

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by icewolf08, Aug 29, 2008.

  1. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
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    Alright, heres is a fun challenge. I have this stove:
    stove1.jpg
    stove2.jpg
    Which our scenic designer would like to have light up like there is a real flame inside. Catch is that the stove is portable, so it can't plug in. The inside diameter of the base is 9-7/8". I am currently investigating battery powered silk flame devices, but I would love to hear other options.

    I do still have the wireless dimmers, but they are in use already in the show.
     
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    How can something that large, and presumably heavy and HOT, be considered "portable"? I suspect in either Le Torcia OR Le Flame lies your solution.
     
  3. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    I should have included a person for scale. The piece is actually very light weight (though it's oil reservoir is empty), and it is only about 3' tall, so not hard to move. The LeFlame is too big to fit in the unit (I think, it is hard to tell what their dimensions refer to). The real kicker is being able to run this on DC power. I know the two faux flame units we own have AC fans in them, so they couldn't run on a battery. However, I am looking into 1) if the units we have fit in the piece, and 2) getting DC fans for them.
     
  4. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    Getting DC fans shouldn't be a problem. Check Grainger and Mcmaster-Carr. You're looking for equipment cooling fans. Both have a pretty good selection. Just don't forget that you also need to change the lamps out to low voltage. However, it's possible that your flame units already use low voltage DC fans and lamps. If they're powered off a wall wart, then they are low voltage units. If this is the case, simply checking the output voltage on the adapter will tell you what your voltage requirements are.
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Project Manager, Stagecraft Industries, Inc.
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    There's always a low voltage solution, that should be my new motto. Worst case scenerio install a 12 volt "muffin" fan < I hate the term Muffin fan, I much prefer the term brushless, which what they are after all. >
    and run it off batteries. As is often the case 120 volt devices are typicallly just running off of transformers that take them from 120 to 12 or 24. Again I think you could almost build the entire silk flame setup yourself as a custom unit for the price you'd pay for a retail version. 'Course with Halloween comming up..... I bet you could find a couple of real cheap toy models that might do the trick. I've been playing with a lot of toy bubble machines for the show I'm currently working on.
     

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