Flameless Match?

MusicMej

New Member
Help! I need to replicate lighting matches and having them burn out for a show. We can't use actual matches due to fire code restrictions (no budging on this--it's for competition). I'm a complete newby to special effects/electrical/LED stuff, but have some smart students/parents that can help follow instructions. Thanks!!
 

BillConnerFASTC

Well-Known Member
As a start, can it be cupped in the actors hand? Or does flame really have to be fully visible to audience? That will be tough to be convincing.

How far from first row?
 

MusicMej

New Member
It can be cupped. She is supposed to be lighting matches to stay warm. Probably 8-12' from front row depending on the competition venue.
 

venuetech

Well-Known Member
Departed Member
In my mind this effect could be small fixtures focused on actors face. The match would just be an action that the actor does perhaps with a small battery led to start the strike, closely followed by a building glow then a slow fade. Make WSOD (Willing Suspension Of Disbelief) do the work. It will rely on the actor to make it beleavable.
Silk and fan to create wavy light

Another thought would be if the actor was holding a box of matches that box could hide an LED array to focus on actors face.
 
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JD

Well-Known Member
If she has to strike the match, a little talcome powder can help simulate the smoke from the strike.
 

Amiers

Renting to Corporate One Fixture at a Time.
If only these were an actual thing.

http://www.popsci.com/led-matches-are-half-as-useful-as-well-matches

There is this made in 09. Directions are in the description. Seeing as it's cupped I would use a white and amber led for a more colorful flicker.


I especially like the fact that you have to strike it across the magnets it gives it that real effect. Now if that is true or not I'm not sure cause it looks like there is a button towards the back that he was pushing. Maybe it was shaking of the video. 2009 tech hard to tell.

As with and HV cap be careful they might be tiny but they will bite and they are not forgiving.

Have fun.
 

Dover

Active Member
This may be a good one to try a scent effect on. Sulfur is the primary odoriferous compound in the burning match smell and is easy to source and quite potent.
 

jonliles

Well-Known Member
Fight Leukemia
A coin cell battery (like a cr2032), a momentary micro switch, maybe a small resistor (such a simple circuit, shouldn't need the resistor as the coin cell has enough internal resistance), and a flickering LED is all you need. I just bought several of them from Adafruit. Would be really easy to hide that in a book or box of matches.
 

Leo Mauler

Member
Check your local dollar stores and other places selling extremely cheap merchandise before buying flickering LEDs online. Inexpensive battery-powered flickering tealights and taper candles can often be found where the flickering effect is all inside the LED, with the plastic part largely holding the batteries and guiding the power to the LED. Bonus: the tealights come with a CR2032 battery.

One idea which occurred to me, depending on how strict your theatre fire code is, would be to have a small CR2032 flickering light in the palm of the actress' hand, and the "match" be a small steel rod which is struck against a spark-producing material, such as a flint surface. This way the "match" doesn't have to contain the light source or even the battery, and the act of cupping the hand around the match squeezes the switch to light the flickering LED light, which then illuminates the actress' face. As the match "goes out", the actress simply stops squeezing the switch, and the flickering LED goes out.
 

Leo Mauler

Member
Check your local dollar stores and other places selling extremely cheap merchandise before buying flickering LEDs online. Inexpensive battery-powered flickering tealights and taper candles can often be found where the flickering effect is all inside the LED, with the plastic part largely holding the batteries and guiding the power to the LED. Bonus: the tealights come with a CR2032 battery.

One idea which occurred to me, depending on how strict your theatre fire code is, would be to have a small CR2032 flickering light in the palm of the actress' hand, and the "match" be a small steel rod which is struck against a spark-producing material, such as a flint surface. This way the "match" doesn't have to contain the light source or even the battery, and the act of cupping the hand around the match squeezes the switch to light the flickering LED light, which then illuminates the actress' face. As the match "goes out", the actress simply stops squeezing the switch, and the flickering LED goes out.
This solution would work even if the fire code is strict, since the sparks aren't as necessary as the striking friction sound, which you can accomplish with a wooden matchstick without the striking head, and a piece of sandpaper on the box of matches.
 

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