Got one of these for Christmas

gafftapegreenia

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Sep 24, 2005
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Michigan
So, I got this handy little guy for Christmas. I was wondering if any else has one and what they think. I haven't really had a chance to use mine yet.
 

ship

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Mar 29, 2003
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They use them about the shop and seem to find them useful. Me, I have my 3.6v Panasonic cordless screw drivers that have lasted and even excelled over the last eight years without problems other than dead batteries. This and the newer 7.2v DeWalts as a similar product that all you have to do is replace the battery once bad, or swap out for the extra while in use.

Don't know about the little pup type screw drivers but batteries and long term use over the years might be a factor. On the other hand, ergodynamics and if it lasts a few years might be payoff enough in buying a new one.

Primary question than is how long it needs to charge up before use and how long that charge lasts in the next three years before disposing of this desposible tool?

Add to that blade lock in being able to further tighten a screw beyond battery torque, and trigger lock for transport - a PITA when a trigger is touched otherwise in wearing down the battery before use. In the past such tools needed either really small battery inserts that wear down fast or the tool to be plugged in for like an hour between running out of juice which progressively got worse.

Wombat as this item appears as if appropriate... yep, they are about at work but I don't know anything about them - nobody asked me what might be best for use about the shop. I will have said one of the above other tools.
 

derekleffew

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gafftapegreenia

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Location
Michigan
Hey now. I have a 12v and an 18v DeWalt. The 12v in nearly three years old and has seen some hard use.
 

soundlight

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Oct 27, 2005
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NJ & NYC
I'm totally in love with my new Makita 18v Lithium Ions at work. Light weight and it'll torque your arm off if you aren't careful.
I've heard that those ones are the new ones that other companies are gonna have to match to stay in the game. I went to the local hardware store to check out the craze, and they're really light. If they do live up to the torque like you say, they've got it.

Of course, nothing can hold its own against DeWalt 36V in terms of power or weight - except that weight here is the heaviest, not the lightest.
 

avkid

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Mmm...Makita
My little green baby is about to celebrate it's 25th birthday!
 

derekleffew

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...I'm totally in love with my new Makita 18v Lithium Ions at work. Light weight and it'll torque your arm off if you aren't careful...
I'd be amused watching you use that to install connectors or cover plates or open a moving light.

Charc, it's more than 4 seconds of screwing. I don't know anyone who can screw in 4 seconds.:oops: Although in this case, shorter is better. After all, time is money.
 

avkid

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Phil, Celebrate by retiring it and getting the new Li-Ion. It weighs about the same... maybe even less... than your old one and it'll recharge in 15 minutes.
Horse hockey, it has sentimental value and charges in 45 minutes.
I inherited it from my grandfather.
 

Charc

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Joined
Feb 14, 2007
The truth comes out!

"Hey Jimmy, we need to discuss your grade this semester... but, heck, I'm feeling nice. Just wire up these 140 new S4s and I'll give ya an 'A'. I don't have a crimper, but I do have an 18 volt li-ion screwgun you can borrow."
 

ship

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Mar 29, 2003
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Illinois
Ah' the Makita... Almost for a moment I thought it was my HD version for a moment. (Had a good death that tool.) What's all this talk about 36v etc. tools... you are not going out into the woods for a week straight without power, you are on a stage with lots of hot outlets. 12v to 14.4v is sufficient for a cordless drill and a cordless drill is never sufficient for a screw terminal that has wire connected to it. Fine for a cord strain relief but not for something electrical without at very least under-torquing and verifying tension by hand as you would with any cordless tool.

None the less, there is a lot of valid cordless screwdrivers on the market these days. The Handi-pack type batteries, various other types up to 7.2v. Big difference in using such a thing as your screw driver - with blade lock and removable batteries, from some cordless drill or plug-in type screwdriver. As said, I have my two styles I purchase, there are other types and none the 9.6v old school Makita even for strain reliefs.

General concepts would be blade lock, trigger lock, gear speeds either for lower voltage between like 0-200 and 0-400 rpm, or for up to 7.2v 0-400v. Extra battery packs and a at most one hour charger. Quick change 1/4" bit holder that's magnetic if possible and a handle grip that has the pistol grip option if not already in that position. Voltage rating in giving at least 30 min. work should be a combined 3.6v up to 7.2v. Beyond that, ergodynamics, weight and quality.
 

derekleffew

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What ship said! And I'll repeat my suggestion for this one. But I do as ship suggested, and always finish with my regular "retro" manual screwdriver.
 

gafftapegreenia

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Sep 24, 2005
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Michigan
My dad has owned that B&D model for years. Even got a new one when the old one died. I just wanted to try this Skil out. Skil was the first one to make a small driver of this size, plus it's compact size made it attractive. You will all be sure to know what I think. Either I'll love it or it will sit next to my ColdHeat (I hate that thing).