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hanging pipe

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by wyatt20019, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. wyatt20019

    wyatt20019 Member

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    yesterday i saw something online somewhere but i dont remember where and now i cant find it. it as a removable hanging pipe that goes through the ceiling and you can easily take it down. anyone know what im talking about.
     
  2. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    I don't have a clue what you're talking about, as your description is something less than cryptic, but I will say that discussing rigging is a topic generally frowned upon here on Control Booth, as per our TOS. When suspending anything over people's heads, our stock reply is
    Gravity Kills - Consult a Qualified Rigger!,
    perhaps from here.

    Maybe you saw something on this site, The Light Source. The same advice above still applies. Don't even think of hanging anything over your head that you've purchased from your local home improvement center.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2008
  3. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Your question is vague. I'm suspicious you are talking about a device that attaches to the framework of a drop ceiling and allows you to hang things. If yes there are several products on the market that can do that. I remember looking at one of these products at LDI two years ago and I think it had a weight limit of less than 20 pounds. So I quickly ignored and forgot about it as it's too light of duty to safely use for most theater lighting applications. Contact your favorite local dealer to help you find a product that best matches your application needs. A good dealer should be willing to send someone to your facility, take a look at your needs, help you purchase the correct product, and train you how to use it safely.

    Now if what you are asking is to find a way to quickly hang/remove a full batten (or truss) with a bunch of lights on it... There is almost always a way to install a low profile, portable system. There are lots of ways to design a system that has very limited visible impact on the room when the batten is removed and yet is relatively easy to put up and take down. BUT you are not qualified to design or install that system. Contact a professional rigger or your local dealer to get them to design, install, and train you to safely use a portable lighting hanging system. Just tell them what you want and let the experts figure out how to safely do it for you.

    Please don't take this as an insult, but the fact that you have to ask the question shows you aren't qualified to do whatever it is you are thinking of doing. So please Do NOT do this yourself. We make a big deal about rigging around here because rigging mistakes are the easiest way to kill someone in theater. You need to get professional help on this project!
     
  4. wyatt20019

    wyatt20019 Member

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    sorry i might not have provided enough detial. it was a device that had support above the ceiling and it mounts flush with the sheetrock. when not being used the hole in the sheetrock is covered by a little plastic piece. does this help any???
     
  5. Van

    Van CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    Mosy hotel / convention center rooms have rig points buit into the structure of the ceiling. These are engineered threaded units that tie directly into the truss work work of the ceiling the points often rest just above the false ceiling and are covered with a plastic cover , this is not an add-on. Most venues will have the specs for their own hang points allowing you to then purchase the properly graded bolts to use. As stated above this type of rigging is to be done only by a qualified individual.
    The installation of such hardware has to be supervised / signed off on by a structural engineer as it's not just about the possibility of a pipe falling down, but bringing an entire roof down ontop of a room full of people.
     
  6. Clifford

    Clifford Active Member

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    Strand has something very similar to what you described [user]wyatt20019[/user]. I'm trying to find it, but I may have to re-install SystemBuilder.
     
  7. Malabaristo

    Malabaristo Active Member

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    It sounds like you're looking for something like this. It's called a Retractable Lighting Position and is sized for up to four circuits and 1000 pounds of fixture.
     
  8. wyatt20019

    wyatt20019 Member

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    YES! thats exactly what ive been looking for. thank yoou sooo much
     
  9. Clifford

    Clifford Active Member

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    Ah, [user]Malabaristo[/user] got in before me. A system like this is a good sized install (depending on scale).
     
  10. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Ugh, he beat me to the chase too. Yep, that's an interesting device. Of course it still needs to be installed by a professional, and if you're in a school, then you need to talk with maintenance/facilities.
     
  11. Clifford

    Clifford Active Member

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    I made a presentation at a local technology company for my robotics team and they had them in their conference hall. Only one was extended, but I must say, it was very snazzy.
     
  12. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    What WILL that ETC company think of next?:lol:
     
  13. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    No offense, but I didn't think their workshop recap video was all that hilarious... :neutral:
     
  14. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

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    Looks VERY expensive. As van said there are cheaper options out there that aren't automated... but no matter what you are talking about some serious engineering to get it right and safe... which means expensive. You might get lucky and the facility is extra strong right where you want it to be... on the flip side it might be incredibly weak and require installing a lot of extra steel I-beams to do. Some sort of free standing truss device is usually a much better option... and a LOT cheaper... you can buy a small DJ setup for under $1000. Larger custom designed stuff will cost you more but probably substantially less than installing this kind of stuff. Again call your local dealer and ask them to come over and give you some ideas how to do what you are thinking of.
     
  15. Sean

    Sean Active Member

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    These things aren't automated, as far as I know....what would be the point? You have to insert the hanging pipe after the hanger is "deployed."

    I don't think a "small DJ setup" is the same thing. This device is for those rooms that need lighting sometimes, but a clean look at others. They include the circuits (run from an install rack).

    We considered these for one of the rooms in our new venue. Didn't put them in for a variety of reasons (biggest of which was lack of space above the finished ceiling). Would have been a good choice.

    --Sean
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2008
  16. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Yea, Gaff, I'd have to go with Sean, and hazard a guess that these are not automated.

    My reaction to the photos:

    When not in use the position is flush up with the drop ceiling. When you need to use the position, pull the handle to release the catch and let the position telescope down. Slide your 1.5" pipe into the hole, and tighten it in. Revealed after the telescoping action are four circuits, all permanently run to where-ever.

    Seems like a really nifty device for multi-use spaces, or a room that might only need lighting occasionally. Once professionally installed, any ol' Joe should be able to safely operate the device. It's low-tech too, so not much can go wrong.
     
  17. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Or, optionally, three circuits plus one DMX outlet. Woot!
     
  18. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

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    Bahumbug, having to run data to each position from a splitter.
     
  19. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    I wonder if you can sideload those things. They would be fantastic to mount infront of boxes as a box boom position. Or put them IN your proscenium. I could put those things everywhere FOH. Hum.... might be designing a theatre in the future... However I would be to lazy to ever take the pipe and and put them back in, guess I will just stick with the usual brushed steel pipe that everyone puts FOH.
     
  20. MNicolai

    MNicolai Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Gravity is what makes these things work, not friction, so I'd venture to say they are strictly kept at being level, and never used at an angle or as booms. That isn't to say something couldn't be designed that would work, but these aren't meant for that.
     

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