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Automated Fixtures Help with Studio Spot 250s

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by marshmolly123, Jan 21, 2009.

  1. marshmolly123

    marshmolly123 Member

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    Hey, I'm relatively new to this forum and I have a couple of questions, mostly regarding Studio Spot 250s. First, some background. I live in a pretty wealthy area that is very school focused. Because of this, our theater is very privileged. I'm expected to take over from our main LD this coming spring, as he's graduating, so I'm doing all I can to familiarize myself with what we have.

    First, just an idea of what we have to work with. In our inventory, we have over 100 Source 4s of different degrees, 20 6" Fresnels, 15 S4 Pars, and 20 Par cans. We also just acquired 5 Studio Spot 250s. We use two boards: an ETC Express 24/48 and a 48/96. As for the theater itself, we have a 17' x 55' proscenium.

    My questions are mainly regarding the Studio Spots. I have very little knowledge about them and was hoping to learn more. Where would be a good source of information? The user manual is helpful, but I was wondering if there was a way I could put some software on my computer to familiarize myself with them. I'm also curious about the preset effects that can be produced. How can I see what each does?

    Sorry for the abundance of questions...

    - Molly
     
  2. thommyboy

    thommyboy Active Member

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    The best place for you to start is where you have, the manual. The next option is using the Off-Line Editor found here
    It will be a little different in that it looks more like the expression than the express, but still a good spot to work from.

    If you are looking for more information about the studio spot 250 check out the High End Systems Forum
     
  3. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    What Thommy said. Also talk to your local dealers. Some (especially if you buy stuff for them) would be happy to give you a quick run through of its capabilities. Finally, since you have them, there is no replacement for sitting down with them and playing. Also just think of them as another tool for your design, just like any other light. All the rules that apply to other lights apply to movers as well.

    Mike
     
  4. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    My experience with the spot 250:

    Don't use them for specials or anything where you need to hit a mark. The spot 250 (and maybe the color 250) doesn't go to the exact same area on a cue. I've tried it with several different controllers, and a number of different fixtures with different build dates. The thing never hits the same mark time after time.

    Also, it's an old design, which means that anything designed more recently will be much brighter than something designed 10+ years ago with the same lamp size.

    Other than that, it's an ok fixture. The strobe function goes from 0 - 12.5%, and above that are a bunch of intensity macros which I never liked, but to each his own.
     
  5. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    I have never had this problem. As long as they are kept in good maintenance, by units hit their mark every time.

    Mike
     
  6. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    Our theatre has 2 design spot 250's and 4 Design Wash 250's.

    The real way I learned these lights was from virtual software. I plugged Hog3PC into Wysiwyg and just played with them in there, seeing what they could do and how I could use them. Fortunately my theatre recently got a Hog3PC DMX widget, so I'm nice and familiar with it.

    But the best way I can think of if you dont want to put down the money for WYSIWYG (very expensive) is to go down to where ever you purchased them and ask them for a demo. Also another great way is to just go into the booth and mess with them. See what you can do, how fast they move, their strobes, etc.

    Also, you should know the basic properties of DMX and DMX patching if you're going to start using movers. There is TONS of information about DMX on this site, just search for it. Also check the glossary

    Edit: From wolf's post, it appears you might think I'm saying these are the same type of fixtures. Obviously, they are not. Your talking about High End Systems, while I'm talking about Elation (I wish they were HES). Sorry for any confusion. But my recommendations still stand
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  7. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

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    Don't expect them to be particularly fun to program on the Express!
     
  8. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    If you do need to program them on the express, to expand on what Les said, I would suggest making a cheat sheet of what each channel for the fixture does. Otherwise you will be doing a lot of fishing on the board.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  9. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    I never had a problem with it. I am just slightly slower on an Express than I am on a Hog/MA/Avo.

    Mike
     
  10. Les

    Les Well-Known Member

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    Let me rephrase:

    ... Not fun - for the novice user ;-)
     
  11. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, our moving light class started on an Espression 3X and LCD controllers.

    Mike
     
  12. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    While the basics of moving lights are similar, it should be noted that the StudioSpot is a HES fixture and the DesignSpot is an Elation fixture.
     
  13. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    Indeed, but god I wish we weren't using Elation fixtures. But I make do with what we have. Thanks though, I edited my post to point out that they are in fact different movers
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  14. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    I have only used them twice and never had to maintain them, but I wasn't disappointed in the Elation fixtures.

    Mike
     
  15. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    A few years back, we got a large donation. however our former TD(who, I'm not joking, took a "mental absence leave" and threw chairs at students), instead of buying some Martins or HES movers and a good board, she bought decided to buy Elations and a horrible horrible board for them. I dont resent the fact that we have them, we're very lucky to, but I wish we had been more thoughtful in the purchase
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2009
  16. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, although to me Martin and Elation (at least on the Design Pro series) are on the same level. But that is just my feelings from my dislike of Martin and my limited dealings with the Elation units. But yeah, some HES units would have been nice for you.

    Mike
     
  17. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    Behold the crappy-ness that is my intelligent lighting board: The Elation Show Designer 2

    [​IMG]

    While it may not look bad, programming on this thing is the stupidest thing ever, that "joystick" is the most sensative piece of crap ever, writing a chase with it takes forever, and its just a bad bored imo. This is why we now use a Hog3PC DMX Widget and Hog3PC. 1000x better

    /end hijack
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  18. Esoteric

    Esoteric Well-Known Member

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    Okay, that I agree with! I would never buy an Elation console. Yuck. I would rather have MagicQ running on my laptop with no wing.

    Mike
     
  19. LightingPenguin

    LightingPenguin Active Member

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    A warning ..NEVER EVER EVER BUY THIS BOARD!

    ...I have a personal hatred for this board.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009
  20. lightman02

    lightman02 Active Member

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    Yes, I agree that board does suck as I have used it before in a small club that had one. As far as the studio spot's they are a great light and will hit their mark as long as they are in good working order. Elation, Chauvet use cheap stepper motors and drivers which is why they never line up properly. I own a few Studio Spot 250's and do all service myself. I would be willing to help you with any questions you have. The great thing about the SS 250 is it's has just enough features to be impressive but not so many features making it overly complicated. It's not to hard to program with an express as I have done it before however as you are dealing with 5, the number of fixtures makes it a little more work. As far as the preset effects I assume you are talking about the macros??? You can go through them with channel 17 to get an idea of what they do also the manual does have a table that shows a description of them you could also use the front panel display to navigate them without a console.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2009

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