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Honest to god MFA Comp Question

Discussion in 'Question of the Day' started by Grog12, Feb 6, 2008.

  1. Grog12

    Grog12 CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

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    The Lighting Designer has been compared to the drummer in a band, and the scenic and costume designer to the lead guitar player.

    How do you see the role of the lighting designer in the theatrical context?
    How does the Lighting Designer make their contribution?
    Does it vary from production to production?
    Do you agree or disagree and if so how?
     
  2. phil000

    phil000 Active Member

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    A drummer is a bit generous, drummers get the girls...

    Then again, the sound guy is the bass player, so, I guess someone has to be the drummer.

    I think it's a poor analogy. Anyway, it just doesn't quite feel comparable...The scenery and costumes are entirely dependent on being seen...You can have a band without a drummer...see acoustic guitar acts.
     
  3. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    Without techies, actors wouldn't have a show.
    Without actors, techies would have no show.

    This is the argument that's been going on forever...who is more important. But now it seems that techies are turning on each other. Without lights, costumes and scenery are invisible, and without costumes and scenery, you have a colorful, blank stage. Sure you can have a crappy lighting design that does nothing more than throw light in the stage's direction, but you can also have a ratty, half As$ costume job that doesn't fit the show's theme, time period, etc.

    All aspects are important, and I think people develop this imaginary hierarchy because of whats visible. you see the amazing clothes that the actors wear, see the towering set, but you don't notice the things that allows you to see it. You take the lighting for granted because light is always there. I think that sound might be at the bottom of the list. Nobody notices the sound until its not there anymore
     
  4. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Meh, everyone can exist without the other just fine. Look at street theatre, and then add in clubs where all it is is a light show...
     
  5. bobgaggle

    bobgaggle Well-Known Member

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    touche, I didn't make myself clear. I was speaking in the context of the stereotypical, broadway-esque stage production (as I interpreted the question).

    You make a good point about lighting in clubs
     
  6. BNBSound

    BNBSound Active Member

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    Without techs, the actors would be just be talking to themselves in an empty room, naked... in the dark.

    Without actors, the techs would be specialists in similar fields, highly paid, well respected, well rested.

    WHAT?! And quit showbiz?!!!
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    How do you get a drummer off your porch?
    How do you know the drum riser is level?
    What do you call a guy who hangs out with four musicians?

    Yep, the drummer/Lighting Designer analogy seems just about correct.;)
     
  8. Logos

    Logos Well-Known Member

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    Whats the difference between an drummer and a drum machine?

    Now children we should all play nice. The whole point about our industry regardless of whether you are doing a fit up in an old garage to put on a show for your mates or rigging a broadway extravaganza or unloading 95 trucks of gear so the Rolling Stones can continue to posture is that we are a co operative industry. None of us can survive without the others.

    C**p, that sounds truly mealy mouthed.

    Never mind, get on with it tear each others throats out, I'll just sit here and watch.
     

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