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I don't talk philosophy at work

Discussion in 'General Advice' started by porkchop, Nov 15, 2008.

  1. porkchop

    porkchop Well-Known Member

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    Randomly a memory popped into my head and I thought it might start some interesting banter. As we all learned in this thread, there are some very good reasons to have two neutrals on a dimmer rack. On one of our shows we have dimmers with two neutrals and they are both utilized but not in a conventional way (or for that matter a way that I can easily wrap my brain around). Basically what happens is the feeder fun comes in its common 5 cable fashion and plugs into the dimmers as expected. This is all the electrician running power is responsible for (side note the other neutral goes off much later in the load in to be utilized in the set). So of course one of the questions that every new hire asks is why are there two cams for neutral. My stock answer at this point is "I don't talk philosophy at work, if you are really interested ask me by the pool tonight."

    So I ask the CB world if you are loading in, teaching a new hire to run the main power lines that the riggers probably needed 20 minutes ago, and someone asks you about the 2nd, unused neutral cam, what is your answer AT THE MOMENT? Obviously one could go in depth later when theres time to talk about electromagnetic interference and dimmer curves and such so ships senior thesis (or the equivalent) is against the rules that I just made up. What do you all here consider the appropriate amount of information at such a time when you are trying to work as fast as possible because the whole rest of the crew (and the hired locals) are waiting for you?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2008
  2. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    The most basic answer you can give without giving a lesson on how chopped sine waves affect neutral current is to simply tell the new hire that it's required by code to be that way.
     

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