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I'm not clever with titles...

Discussion in 'New Member Board' started by arik52, Oct 27, 2008.

  1. arik52

    arik52 Member

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    ...It's why I don't like using subject lines in emails.

    My name is Kira and I'm a junior at Lower Merion High School outside of Philadelphia, PA. I've been involved in our theatre organization, Players, for three years now. I've spent every single production as a member of the Scenery Crew, or in a leadership position attached to that crew (except for my show as dramaturg - I did all of my work at home and spent every day with Scenery Crew). Currently, I'm Scenery/Props Crewhead for Guys and Dolls and leading a crew full of completely inexperienced sophomores and freshman, all working on their first show. Next show, The Diary of Anne Frank, I'm applying for Set Designer and hopefully will receive that position.

    I've never strayed from Scenery, but recently I've begun to take interest in other areas of theatre, and crave something different. I adore Players, it's difficult to consider myself having experience when I've only ever worked in one theatre, with one system. I really want to explore various opportunities and acquaint myself with more than just Scenery; however, that's not possible at my high school. You can't do more than one crew per show, and there being so few experienced members on my crew, it's necessary that I stay. Not only that, but I wouldn't be able to not do Scenery for a show.
     
  2. cdub260

    cdub260 CBMod CB Mods

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    Well arik52, if you really want to work in theatre, you should learn as much as you can about as many different aspects of production as you can. While it's important for any production to have access to, as an example, skilled scenic carpenters, a skilled scenic carpenter who can also run a lighting console is even better. This is a very competitive industry we're in, and if you limit yourself to one, narrow aspect of production, you will limit your employment prospects as you move forward in the industry.

    My recommendation to you would be to discuss the situation with your instructors, and let them know that while you enjoy doing scenic work, it might be beneficial to your future in the industry if you could branch out into other areas as well.

    Oh, and before I forget, welcome aboard.:mrgreen:
     
  3. Hughesie

    Hughesie Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
    Freelance Lighting Programmer/grandMA Trainer
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    Welcome to Controlbooth, where all aspects of theater knowlage are welcomed.
     
  4. arik52

    arik52 Member

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    Thanks guys! I actually just secured a day in December where I will be job shadowing the TD at the Arden Theatre Company in Philadelphia. Most kids at my school just take a notepad and follow their person around, asking questions for their job shadowing experience (which is required junior year at my school). However, I've arranged with the TD (Glenn Perlman) to actually be working on the set and experiencing other aspects of his position. I'm really excited, it should be a great experience.
     
  5. Kelite

    Kelite Apollo Staff Premium Member

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    I think we all know how that feels! How can you not do something that really trips your trigger?

    As Cdub so eloquently stated- be sure to cross train on as many different portions of theatercraft as you can. I would much rather have a few folks that could step in and help in a pinch when the inevitable happens (sickness, accidents, whatever). Who knows, maybe you'll find something even more enjoyable.
    The circumstance of finding yourself 'too valuable' to not help with a particular portion of the crew happens in every industry. Ask the guy working in the machine shop that became so adept (and valuable for the crew) at running a lathe, that he never had the opportunity to learn the other dozen disciplines within the shop. The term pigeon-holed comes to mind here...

    Yes, do what you love, but get out a bit a try a few more things before you can't.

    And welcome to the CB! :clap:
     

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