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Indoors vs Outdoors

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by EPAC_Matt, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. EPAC_Matt

    EPAC_Matt Member

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    Heya, I'm about to venture into lighting design tomorrow.

    I've got a question however... What are some methods I could use to differentiate between indoors scenes and outdoors scenes? Are there any particular instances when frontlight and top-down light would be appropriate, added to the standard cool and warm light comming from the boxbooms?

    Any ideas appricated!

    Best Regards,
  2. zac850

    zac850 Well-Known Member

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    New York
    hum, day and night is easier then inside and outside. You may want to try using some sort of gobo for the outside scenes, if your in the woods possibly try a tree gobo...

    What type of show is this? If it is for a musical the "rules" of lighting change a bit. You may want to try using a sunlight yellow colors for outside in addition to a normal wash (or blue's if it is nighttime) and a more amber for inside.
  3. digitaltec

    digitaltec Active Member

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    President of CRU design, LLC
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Well, to keep it simple, the indoors might have more of an amber to it and the outdoors would have more of a golden glowing feeling. Now, it also depends on what time of the year it is and what time of day.
  4. Les

    Les Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    DFW, Tx.
    There are no rules to light design. More No Color blue, as opposed to Light Bastard Amber or Light Pink should give more of a Daylight color temperature. And as zac850 said, you can try to incorporate gobos into your outdoor scenes, and they don't even need to be obvious, like a tree. they can also be indirect, such as a breakup gobo coming from somewhere above. Otherwise, I would just rely on the set and its designer to do the job.

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