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Inky's and birdie's

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by Techiegirly, Dec 12, 2007.

  1. Techiegirly

    Techiegirly Member

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    Do you think an entire show could be lit using ONLY inky and birdie lights? I'm freaking obsessed with these cute little lights! The other day at work I was being really silly when I blurted out that I was going to light an entire show with these lights but when my co-worker told me I could probably get away with lighting a show like that it got me wondering if these lights could be effective enough to do such a thing???
     
  2. DarSax

    DarSax Active Member

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    You would need a LOT of them. To the point where you would use as many as you could possibly fit on the pipe, or in the electrical system, or however.


    But I mean...I guess...
     
  3. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Could light a show with a bunch of candles, a bunch of car lights, a bunch of flash lights. Better yet is to design the show with lighting to enhanse the production rather than have the production for artistic or novilty sense. Hate the term Form follows Function for the architect that never really inspired me - even if growing up blocks away from one of his houses... still design the show first and if artistic intent and need necessatates such a concept than go for it. Until than, reserve it to your fascination with perhaps an element of it in what you design out of your personal style.

    Me, I loved a nice PAR 64 sealed beam lamp down light. That say 5x5 degree beam of light for an end scene that on a two scene preset board with indipendant circuit control would allow me to in end scene bring down the scene lighting while intensifying that last down light. Somewhere around just perfect for mood I would hit the point where the rest of the scene lights hit zero and the indipendant down light would make the talent left on stage glow as if ascending to a higher plane of existance by way of down light glow to them. It would quickly go to black out to follow once point made to the audience. Mind you audience in this design intent. Couldn't use such a light for all or even many shows but a few I got to use it on allowed for quite the effect.

    Have this effect, or type of beam in mind perhaps within what paint brushes or images you can make happen for a scene at an appropriate time to establish mood etc. Trust that at some point it would be appropriate to put forth your idea in conveying what you feel when such a lighting is done. Wait until such a time when that effect you most want to use comes in being appropriate. I warn against using an effect or technique in any other than when it is right to use such a thing. At that point form does not follow function, nor is art being made, just your self gradification without the intent of your design purpose.
     
  4. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    On the other hand, there is available a 150w JDR - MR-16/E-26 lamp which while not rated for most mini Par cans, would have significant punch even if wide angle. There are also 250w rated 3" Fresnel fixtures. This in addition to mini-Lekos available.

    I come from a background of a 9'-1" ceiling in the studio theater with a 14' width to it. PAR 38's and stubby PAR 46 fixtures also in addition to the above proved useful given the very short throw distances for me in the past. Really hard to get an angle given the above theater space short of using really small fixtures of the sort. More tools of the trade I suppose for me in fighting the shadows as people walk across the stage and attempting to get an even designed coverage. Yep, used all these fixtures in the past, in some ways, reduce the throw distance and it is easier to design I suppose. Much harder to design a show with such fixtures on the other hand in other ways. This given either need to have fixture at short range to target so as to retain intensity - given the wattage or given distance to target hard to have a wide enough beam spread to cover the stage yet design to that coverage.
     
  5. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Hey, Techiegirly, check out this link. World's smallest PARbar. No Socapex required. First time anyone sees one of these they can't help but say, "Ahhhh." Cuter than a Fairy Penguin or a Wombat, if you ask me.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  6. Techiegirly

    Techiegirly Member

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    That "link" is dead :(
     
  7. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    Sorry about that. I think I fixed it, or just click the thumbnail below.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2008
  8. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    Ah yes, the obsession with instruments, allow me to put my take.

    First, ship, I think I understand you post. Basically what you are saying is that, if it artistically and creativly fits the show, go for it. However, don't do something just because you want to when it has no place in the overall design of a show. If it works with your intent as a designer, who's to say "no".

    That said, I've been in numerous small little "inside a house" theatre's where birdies and inkies are perfect. Short throws require smaller units with wider spreads. So there is a very practical aspect to designing a show with "just birdies and inkies".

    On the other hand, when playing the role of designer, (I'm not going to call myself an LD-we've had this discussion in the past), I love to use "alternative" lighting sources. Colored PAR 38 lamps, porch lights, christmas lights, haogen work lights can all be used effectivly in a design. It's fun to go to Home Depot and see what might make an interesting effect on the stage. Also related is my fascination with older lights. They have a unique look, stlye and feel all there own. They have theiir own uses, both practical (when nothing else is available) and artistic (when going for a specific look or feel). The central idea is that the designer should use all the tools available to them creatively and consciously while keeping things appropriate for the show. Look at the pictures of Spring Awakening. The artistic goal of the show was obviously to use bright, deeply saturated colors with a "rock" feel, hence the amount neon tubes and color changing LED's incorporated into the scenery.

    One of the best pieces of advice I have ever been given by a professional designer is that "you must first know all the rules before you can break them". Much like the footlight discussion, maybe you have a perfect reason, artistically inspired, for using lighting from such an angle. With the small inkies and birdies, maybe you're designing a show where you want the look of multiple small sources of light because it works with the overall themes and messages the creative team is trying to convey. Overall, don't do something "just for the hell of it", or maybe, more specifically, "because I feel like it", but rather know why and understand you have made a certain design choice. Sure, we could all design shows with just Source 4 ERS's and PAR's, but that wouldn't be fun, nor would it allow a designer to get creative.
     
    Logos likes this.
  9. derekleffew

    derekleffew Resident Curmudgeon Senior Team Premium Member

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    You had me in total agreement with you, (probably because you were expounding on what Ship had said, because I must be cranky tonight,) until the last sentence.
    I've had lots of fun designing with S4s and PARs, and I think, gotten creative. I've also designed shows entirely from aisles 3&4 of Home Depot, but more due to budgetary constraints than artistic vision. I much prefer the former. The fixtures and dimmers and consoles are merely the tools to achieve the end result.
     
  10. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

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    Derek, in thinking about that statement, the sentiments in my mind as I wrote it were more along the lines of those who would say that Source 4 PAR's and ERS's and the only "right" way to design a show. Again it's all dependant on your ability, and as much as I enjoy a fresh stock of S4, I just don't know if I would want that for the rest of my career. Perhaps that is just a reflection on my current state as a student of light.
     

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