Learning Networking

NateJanota

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
Orlando, FL
So I confess- I learned just enough Computer Engineering in college to be dangerous. Count the two years since I was a student and I really am barely even that anymore.

This means my understanding of networking is shameful, at best, and a hindrance to my workplace (theme parks prefer networked timecoded shows). I hear a tremendous number of terms thrown about (network switch, fiber-to-ethernet, data gate, etc) and see a lot of complicated numbers and verbiage that makes me feel a little dumb.

To that extent, does anyone know of some resources to help me...
1) ... Grasp the basics of networking in general, and get up and running with the lingo
2) ... Find out more about how networking applies to lighting, as well as common products/services in that regard
3) ... Learn enough to become more-than-dangerous (a.k.a. armchair expert) once the above two tasks are complete

I greatly appreciate all the advice and help!
 

Morte615

Active Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Location
Clermont, FL
Look at the A+ and Net+ certifications. Any local technical school and almost any college should be able to hook you up with classes. Also there are books and such online to help out. I haven't been certified since I graduated so not completely sure where they are at in relation to the current and upcoming technologies but they will give you a good basis and from there you should be able to catch up on your own.

Does Universal offer classes or outside training opportunities? I know at Disney we are given many chances all you have to do is ask about it. I just finished a 2 day Fiber Optic class, on the clock with travel time, and at the end of it even got a certification to do FIS Fusion Fiber Splices.
 
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NateJanota

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
Orlando, FL
Look at the A+ and Net+ certifications. Any local technical school and almost any college should be able to hook you up with classes. Also there are books and such online to help out. I haven't been certified since I graduated so not completely sure where they are at in relation to the current and upcoming technologies but they will give you a good basis and from there you should be able to catch up on your own.

Does Universal offer classes or outside training opportunities? I know at Disney we are given many chances all you have to do is ask about it. I just finished a 2 day Fiber Optic class, on the clock with travel time, and at the end of it even got a certification to do FIS Fusion Fiber Splices.
You work at WDW? Where at? :D I used to work in WDW DHS ENT global techs. Was laid off and thus why I'm at Universal. Universal offers no outside training opportunities whatsoever; kind of a bummer, really. Thus why I'm asking. There's a lot of external companies coming in, making sweeping changes, and leaving the technicians with little or nothing to go off of. The Tech I is overworked, and I (as the Tech II) am frankly underworked since there's not much I can (or am allowed) to do.
 

NateJanota

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
Orlando, FL

Morte615

Active Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2011
Location
Clermont, FL
Yeah I work at Epcot as a video tech mainly but you know how it is I jump all over.
I also endorse John Huntington book, I have 2 versions and still refer to both of them. I am pretty sure there is a thread on here somewhere about basic reading for the tech, bit I also say if you are doing this as a professional you should have a copy of the Backstage Handbook (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0911747397/?tag=controlbooth-20) If you don't already have one.

Sent from my LGLS991 using Tapatalk
 

NateJanota

Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
Orlando, FL
Yeah I work at Epcot as a video tech mainly but you know how it is I jump all over.
I also endorse John Huntington book, I have 2 versions and still refer to both of them. I am pretty sure there is a thread on here somewhere about basic reading for the tech, bit I also say if you are doing this as a professional you should have a copy of the Backstage Handbook (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0911747397/?tag=controlbooth-20) If you don't already have one.

Sent from my LGLS991 using Tapatalk
Ah, gotcha! EPCOT was where I interned with Attractions before Entertainment kidnapped me (for better, for worse), and it feels like home to me. AmGard is a great venue, wouldn't mind busking there. I will definitely take all y'all's advice and look into Huntington's books. I have a Backstage Handbook but I didn't know it covered networking, so I will have to dig that out and put it to better use.
 

MikeJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2013
Location
Here and There
How about reading @JohnHuntington 's http://www.amazon.com/dp/0615655904/?tag=controlbooth-20 ? I contend that knowledge of IT is not worth much (how much do those GeekSquard peeps get paid?) without knowing how and when to apply said knowledge applicable to live entertainment applications.
I think ill pick this book up, thanks. However, I'm not sure how much GeekSquad knows about anything. Even most cable and internet installers don't understand the difference between a router and a switch.
And how many touring racks have I seen with Ethernet jack labeled "in" and "out.":cool:
I have also seen people try to way over complicate a what should have been a very simple network.
 

ruinexplorer

Sherpa
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Las Vegas
For entertainment lighting needs, I'd also recommend Rock Solid Ethernet by Wayne Howell. Though it is a decade old, most of what is used for entertainment is still valid. You can also get it for your Kindle. It's written more as a discussion, so if you need to get down to the nitty-gritty, you will probably need to get some actual network textbooks. This is more on how and why it is used for entertainment.
 

MikeJ

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Joined
Nov 29, 2013
Location
Here and There
Picked up Huntingtons book, and I could see it used as a text for a college class. It has very broad overviews of technology, and then some, somewhat in depth examples of application; a good foundation. For example he VERY basically explains subnets and IP addresses, and just glazes over it by saying everything you want to work together just needs to be on the same subnet, and share the same first 3 octets of its IP address. While following this will make your network work, it is only half true and there is a lot left out.

The "Advanced Networking" chapter is really just basic networking for anyone who has a general grasp on networking to begin with. It could be titled "using a tiny bit of a managed switch"

It is a well written and easy to follow book, and I think some of the less experienced people I work with may benefit from reading it, but personally, I guess was expecting something more useful than broad concepts and general knowledge. This is a book for STUDENTS, not for PROFESSIONALS.

Now in defense of the book, I have seen a LOT of tours come out of very reputable shops, with terrible networking practices, and woefully uninformed(as far as networking is concerned) people taking care of things. This book WOULD help them, but if you have enough knowledge to setup a managed switch, skip this book. Unless you are ready to dive into some really technical Cisco nerd stuff, there does not seem to be too much in between.