The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

light tree

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by arfinator, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. arfinator

    arfinator Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Master Electrician
    Location:
    Madison, NJ
    How many stage lights can you safely put on a light tree?
     
  2. DaveySimps

    DaveySimps CBMod CB Mods Premium Member

    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    224
    Occupation:
    Performing Arts Center Manager
    Location:
    Macomb, MI
    It varies greatly depending on the height, diameter, base, material of the tree and how much the individual lighting instruments weigh. I would also consider wether it is being used indoors or outdoors because wind can be a great safety concern as well.

    ~Dave
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2008
  3. arfinator

    arfinator Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Master Electrician
    Location:
    Madison, NJ
    It is being used inside. I was thinking about using source four elipsoidals and source four pars.

    I don't know about the height of the pipe, maybe 10-15' maybe shorter. This is my only place to hang lights and I want to get as few as possible.

    Do you know of places to rent trees?
     
  4. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

    Messages:
    9,431
    Likes Received:
    1,826
    Location:
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    If what you are looking for is a weighted boom base that take 1 1/2 sch 40 pipe, here ya go... they usually come in 50lb variety's. If you are low on the pipe, under 6' you can load it up as much as you want. I would suggest though that you also chain as many stageweights as possible to base. Over 6', depends.

    If you are looking for crank up trees, they will come with a manufactures SWL (safe working load). Usually, its around 200 lbs or so. Tell us where you are and we might be able to help you find a rental house.
     
  5. arfinator

    arfinator Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Master Electrician
    Location:
    Madison, NJ
    I am in Phoenix, Arizona.

    I might be able to work under 6 feet. The thing is that I am up on a balcony with this to the side of the stage (I am used to a full grid in a black box) and I am trying to light the whole stage.

    I was thinking of schedule 40 pipe as the way to go.

    Thank you for the quick replies.
     
  6. Charc

    Charc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,850
    Likes Received:
    46
    Digression:

    Schedule 40 for lighting positions and Schedule 80 for rigging?
     
  7. soundman

    soundman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,088
    Likes Received:
    119
    Location:
    Nashville TN

    Not by standard battens are normally schd 40 as it is lighter and for most applications it is getting picked on 8' centers so there is no need for the extra strength.

    I believe the truss used in self climbing towers is schd 80, I know it is heavier.
     
  8. meatpopsicle

    meatpopsicle Active Member

    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    32
    Occupation:
    Programmer/Designer Film & TV
    Location:
    LI
    Lighting positions are rigging. Schedule 40 is going to readily available from your local rental house. Rule of thumb: figure 4 to 6 units on a tree. More if their pars, less if they're lekos. Any more than that and you should secure the top of the tree from above. In any case add sandbags or stageweights to the base to improve stability. Add trees if you need more units. On the last film I was on we made postions out of 50# boom bases, pipe and cheeseboroughs.


    I'm sure the theatre TD's will jump in here and give you their safe working practice.
     
  9. arfinator

    arfinator Member

    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    3
    Occupation:
    Master Electrician
    Location:
    Madison, NJ
    OK.

    Thank you. What is a general rental price for like a 6' tree for like 1 week?
     
  10. SerraAva

    SerraAva Active Member

    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    Just a quick interjection. In my high school theatre, we had schedule 40 battens which had to be replaced with schedule 80. For the high school alone, schedule 40 was enough, but do to loads being put on them from touring shows we needed 80. The pipes were actually bending, one was even bent at a 30 degree angle downward on the one end. So it really depends on what you want to load on them, not what standard is. When the rig was installed, they went off of standard. If they had asked a touring show what it needed to be while the theatre was being built, it would have been schedule 80 to start. So start at schedule 40 and determine if that would be enough, don't just use it because it's 'standard'.

    Also, make sure your arbors can handle the weight too. They just installed a whole new lighting system in the smaller theatre and had to take away all the nice, new, shiny Source Fours and replace them with Colorcraps :evil:. Reason being, someone didn't think to look at what the arbors could handle weight wise with new pipe, cable, raceways, and fixtures :rolleyes:. The Colorcraps weigh about half as much as the Source Fours. So this was very upsetting since I might have to do a show in there soon :(.
     
  11. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,072
    Likes Received:
    675
    Occupation:
    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
    Location:
    Lititz, PA
    First of all, this is really a rigging topic, and probably shouldn't be discussed on CB. If you don't know how to do this, you should be talking to your local theatre shop and/or a local professional. Loading booms can be very dangerous, and if you have not done it before, or you don't do it enough to really know what you are doing then you should work with someone who does.

    As for the discussion about the schedule of flying battens, it has lees to do with what you are putting on them as it has to do with how many lift lines are used to lift them. Each schedule pipe requires different lift line spacing, with schedule 40 you need more lift lines than schedule 80. Yet again, I won't say more as this is also a topic that should not really be discussed on this forum, when working with a fly system, if you don't know what you are doing then you shouldn't do it, and you should call a professional!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice