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lightbulbdepot.com: anybody shop there?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by pianoman, Jun 4, 2007.

  1. pianoman

    pianoman Member

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    I'm just wondering if anyone here buys from lightbulbdepot.com. I came across their site while searching for PS40 lamps for my Olivettes. When I first placed my order, my card was declined because I forgot to transfer money into the account, and they called me today offering to give me a slightly better deal on the lamps if I ordered by phone. The fishy part of this is that they want me to scan and email them a paper that says that I give them permission to use my credit card, with my signature on the page. I have never heard of an online retailer doing this. Any comments?

    -Dan
     
  2. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Some company's that do over the phone sales require this, many old companies do. If you are doing it through a legit company, see if you can't set up and expense account with them. Have them invoice you monthly and you won't have to worry about it.
     
  3. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    I have used www.bulbamerica.com and have had good luck. They carry some of the random ones that aren't used much and the local places don't keep in stock. They Par64 prices are better than most.
     
  4. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    Bulbtronics is also good. Production Advantage also has good prices.

    This place seems pretty good as well, and its a link on google adds, might want to take a look. http://www.soslightbulbs.com/shop/customer/pages.php?pageid=90&gclid=CIyMlIiqw4wCFRlmWAodWk7qaA
     
  5. pianoman

    pianoman Member

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    Thanks. I ended up calling lightbulbdepot as soon as I got my order ship confirmation because of course, I screwed up with my late night shopping; I ordered the 277V 500W PS40 lamps instead of the 120V versions. So now I have to refuse the shipment so it will go back to them and then they'll send me 4 120V 405W bulbs. I figured I could go down on the wattage a bit since I would get an extra 2000 hours of life out of the lamps. Also, they said the whole signing the paper thing wasn't necessary since I essentially approved their use of my card by my initial online order. So all is well with the world, I'm just an idiot. What would you use a 277V lamp for anyway?

    -Dan
     
  6. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    Most commercial buildings that I worked in when I was working as an electrician used 277v lighting. It is more efficient.

    500 watts divided by 120 volts = 4.16 amps
    500 watts divided by 277 volts = 1.81 amps

    It really isn't that simple (loss in transformers, etc...), but the amp load is far less, and more fixtures can be put on one circuit with a 277 system. Theoretically, I can put 10 500watt lights on one circuit of 277, while I can put about 5 on a 120 circuit.


    One 120volt circuit - 120Volts
    Two 120volt circuits - 208volts (2 hots and a ground)

    One 277volt circuit - 120volts
    Two 277volt circuits - 480volts (2 hots and a ground)
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2007
  7. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Occupation:
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    We have a bunch of utility lighting that is 130volts.
     
  8. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    How do you get 130volts? Do you have a special transformer? That is a new one.
     
  9. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Absolutely no clue, though it wouldn't surprise me.
    The guy who wired the building(now retired) is an electrical genius.
    He's good enough that he invited the county inspector into the building in the middle of the project.
    The inspector said that was the first time he had ever been invited into an unfinished building on purpose.
     
  10. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    As said with a repuitable company, at times dependant upon their policy for at least the initial order, they might require something more than just a credit card over the phone. Prevents you from using someone elses credit card to some extent at least. Follow up orders wouldn't be a problem I'm sure.

    Have heard of them before, never heard anything bad about that company or any mentioned. Litterly a hundred repuitable companies that sell lamps.

    The 130v lamps are mostly out there for two purposes. First distribution, at times places near a power plant might see 125v worth of power instead of 120. The range is 110 to 125v. The 130v lamp balances out against slight voltage spikes etc.

    Second reason is it working in a reverse direction of why most modern fixtures use 115v lamps even if they have a 120v system. As opposed to having more luminous output and color temperature in exchange for lamp life, the 130v lamp in a 120v system will drop some in exchange for more lamp life.

    For the most part it's both reasons - a more rugged lamp to some extent, and one that lives longer.
     
  11. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    If you are getting more than 125 volts consistently, I would call the power company. When the power leaves the plant it is at a very high voltage. It is more efficient to transmit and there is less loss due to Joule Heating. It is stepped down in at least 4 steps, with the last being to 120 (or so) volts. If it is more, there is a problem with the transformer that serves you and this will cause problems. Lamps will burn hotter and less efficient, electrical equipment runs hotter as well, and can damage power supplies.

    Thinking about it, I bet 130volt bulbs (or lamps) do last forever. I did some research, and found out that they are frowned upon because people use them on standard 120volt systems, which is not what they were designed for. They are incredibly inefficient and create a yellow/red color as they do not reach their optimal operating temperature. Thus, I would put them in a chandelier or a place that I can't get to easily, but not for everyday use.
     
  12. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    The differences are not as much as you might think. In fact, in your chandiler you might just have some in use already and you won't even notice it if all lamps are 130v or possibly if the 130v lamp is new and the others are old. Otherwise there often is not much of a difference between that of a 120v extended life lamp and a normal 130v lamp.

    The effect of voltage on the light output of a lamp is ±1% voltage over the rated amount stamped on the lamp, gives 3.1/2% more light or Lumens output but decreases the life by 13% and vise a versa.
    Do not operate quartz Projection lamps at over 110% of their design voltage as rupture might occur. GE Projection, Ibid p.13

    A 5% change in the voltage applied to the lamp results in
    -Halving or doubling the lamp life
    -a 15% change in luminous flux
    -an 8% change in power
    -a 3% change in current
    -a 2% change in color temperature (0.4% change per1% voltage.)
    Osram Technology and Application Tungsten halogen Low Voltage Lamps Photo Optics, p.21
     
  13. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    You don't get 130v. Using lamps rated at 130v is simply a way of extending lamp life at the expense of brightness. Operating a 130v lamp on a 115v service is like operating a standard lamp on a dimmer set at 90%. It will last practically for ever but just not be as bright.
     
  14. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    It is not energy efficient to run a lamp at below it's rated voltage and is not recommended (in most scenarios). Yes, the lamp will last longer, and in the theatre, we dim lamps all the time. In a shop, home, garage, etc... it is simply wasteful. It is possible to get a step up transformer to 130volts and the bulbs will work properly.

    A 130-volt bulb operating at 120 volts will last approximately 14,000 hours, while a 120-volt bulb has a life expectancy of only 750 hours. However, since the bulb is not operating at it's peak efficiency, it will use almost 12% more power to create the same light as a 120volt bulb.

    In a hard to get to place, absolutely. If you are concerned about longer life, just get a cold cathode or compact fluorescent. They last longer AND are energy efficient (and much cheaper than they used to be).
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2007

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