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Lighting Designer Title?

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by lighttechie5948, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. lighttechie5948

    lighttechie5948 Active Member

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    Okay, So I've been asked to work on this production in 2 weeks. First off, I'm not receiving any design fee, although I will be putting 60+ hours into the production within 2 weeks of tech. Not getting paid isn't the issue, I am still a freshmen in HS, so I design more for the experience than the cash.

    The producer wants someone else to design the plot, and me to "program the show", which in his way means, to take the plot from the other person and create all the cues from that. He wants me to do this because he says I'm the "best and fastest programmer he knows" (again referring to programmer as designing the "look" of every cue)

    The problem I have with this is that he only wants the person designing the plot to receive "Designer" credit in the playbill. I feel that if he's designing the plot and I'm designing the looks of the cues, we both should receive the "Lighting Designer" title. Personally I would like it to say "Lighting Design - Me & Him", and "ETC Programmer - Me"

    Am I Wrong?

    Please give your opinion, it is greatly appreciated.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2009
  2. Raktor

    Raktor Active Member

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    LD should be there during plotting to say what he wants.

    If he's not going to be there, you're pretty much designing too.

    Just my 2c.
     
  3. lighttechie5948

    lighttechie5948 Active Member

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    Not to mention the fact that i will probably design 40-60% of the light plot, I'm pretty sure I will end up hanging 30-70% of the fixtures and probably focus the entire plot with him on the ladder and me calling the cuts.
     
  4. arfinator

    arfinator Member

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    Occupation:
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    wouldn't let technically make him like a ME but before the design is finalized?
     
  5. Omega

    Omega Member

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    You'd be the Master Electrician and Dimmerboard Operator. If you helped with, or altered, his design, you could be the assistant ld.
     
  6. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    The guy doing the plot is usually called the Lighting Director, or Lighting Supervisor. I have worked for a few theatre companys that will have a Lighting Director design the plot for the season, and then talk to the designer for each show to determine what else they will need, (the place I am thinking of had a plot that contained about 50 movers as well as 100 or so CXI's, so really not much had to change between shows).

    The LD never touched the drafting table. They would come in and call the focus, and usually touch every fixture, but once again the plot was not theirs. The would then, along with the Lighting Director on the console, cue the show. I think this is simular to the situation you will be in.

    My feeling is the person setting the looks is the designer. Anyone can make a plot, there is no design in that. Its the person that brings that plot to life who is the actual designer.
     
  7. xander

    xander Well-Known Member

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    I think if we clarify some terminology we might be in a better place to determine what exactly is going on here. The term "programmer" refers to the person that is doing the button pushing. This (in the theatre world) will have verrrry little to no artistic value. You are just pushing buttons. Setting the looks-channel levels and fade times-would be called "cueing" the show. This would normally be done by the Designer. The designer will also come up with the plot, although s/he may not actually do any drafting (that is what an assistant is for!!), it is still their responsibility. Now, in my opinion, if I had to put numbers to it, I would say that the plot is 25% of the design and the cueing is 75% of the design. The same plot can be cued a million different ways, but the direction/color/shape/texture of a light is also very important. The more automated a plot is the less important that part becomes because you can change almost all of those characteristics during cueing.
    So, with this in mind, if the "designer" you are referring to is just drafting the plot but wont be focusing or cueing anything than they are not doing much in terms of designing. If you are the one that actually picks which channels are at what levels for how long, NOT JUST pushing the buttons to make tham that way, then I think you are more of a designer than the other guy.
     
  8. Anvilx

    Anvilx Active Member

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    Let who ever designs the plot take the Lighting Designer title. The title you want is Master of Illumination, a name of my own creation.
     
  9. lighttechie5948

    lighttechie5948 Active Member

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    LOL! That made my day! As cool as that title sounds, I'd like a title that matches what's under my name on my resume - Lighting Designer.

    I agree with what's been said above I feel that the cueing is 75% of the design. A plot is useless if it's not cued properly.
     
  10. seanandkate

    seanandkate Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    In my world, you'd be the Lighting Designer. If you're designing half the plot and, more importantly, cueing the show, it's your creative vision. You could certainly offer the other person an ALD credit for his help on half the plot, though . . . ;)
     
  11. Pie4Weebl

    Pie4Weebl Well-Known Member Fight Leukemia

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    Isn't this the opposite off the general consensus for the thread I posted a while back asking what my resume should read for a lot of the events I do where I get a plot and then take it from there?
     
  12. ScottH

    ScottH Member

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    I would call you both "associate designers". Its not uncommon on broadway for the billed designer to develop the plot and the concept and have the "associate" cue the show. Associates are responsible for alot these days. Some even focus most of the show. And since it sounds like the concept is yours and you have alot of input on the plot, that would make you both about equal. I assume MEs and assistants wont be billed. My question is, why not just let you design the whole darn thing? Ask your director to give you a chance at the reins. Tell him you are more than capable of handling the challenge...or is there a faculty designer that generally draws the plot?
     

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