Control/Dimming Lighting Network Changes

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
Hi All network people,
I have a question but before I ask I will describe our house system-
Console- ETC Ion Classic (+Element2 +Nomad in different spaces)
Pathport VIA network switch and Pathport Quatro (x3) Duo and Uno (numbers unknown but not relevant)
Currently we use the network address of 10.xxx.xxx.xxx
We have had some touring companies bring in Hog Consoles (not sure which ones) GMA among others. We have had trouble with the Hog not wanting to work on the network with 10.xxx.xxx.xxx subnet 255.255.255.0.
My Tech manager wants to change the IP range of the network to something like 192 or 172.
Could this possibly cause issues? I thought lighting networks should be 10. or 2. for either sACN or Artnet.
Looking forward to hearing your opinions.
Regards
Geoff
 

almorton

Well-Known Member
Could be your subnet mask is limiting your addressing - if it's 255.255.255.0 then the first three octets have to match, so if the hog is (say) 10.1.1.2 and a node is 10.2.2.2, with that subnet mask they can't see each other. with 255.0.0.0 they can.

Although I'm sure you wouldn't have your lighting network connected to the internet, if you do have to then don't use 2.x.x.x addresses, as they are real assigned addresses (in France, I think) and your router will try to route them to the public network. They were never a private address range, they were a reserved range, which meant they could (and in fact did) get used for public addresses. They should never have been used for artnet.
 

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
Could be your subnet mask is limiting your addressing - if it's 255.255.255.0 then the first three octets have to match, so if the hog is (say) 10.1.1.2 and a node is 10.2.2.2, with that subnet mask they can't see each other. with 255.0.0.0 they can.

Although I'm sure you wouldn't have your lighting network connected to the internet, if you do have to then don't use 2.x.x.x addresses, as they are real assigned addresses (in France, I think) and your router will try to route them to the public network. They were never a private address range, they were a reserved range, which meant they could (and in fact did) get used for public addresses. They should never have been used for artnet.
I would like the subnet to be as you suggested but we are a local government venue so are tied down to what the IT department will let us use. At another venue I work we have a 255.0.0.0 subnet and it works well as far as I have seen. We certainly will not be on any network that will connect to the internet. There is no physical connection to a network that can reach the WWW. Network comes straight from the console to the Pathport Via and then to the Quatro(s).

Regards
Geoff
 

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
You might want to look at this product we build specifically for bridging two networks and hosting guest consoles.
Passed this on to my Tech Manager for consideration. It should slot straight in.
Thanks
 

John Palmer

Well-Known Member
There are many possibilities as to where the problems might lie.
Is it only the Hogs that have problems connecting? There are both FixtureNet and HogNet ports on a Hog. They are different NICs and will have different IP addresses.
Are you using Artnet or ETCNet3(sACN)?
Is your network using static IP addresses? If it is using dynamic IP addresses, what is serving DHCP?
I don't know the Pathport Via, but how was it configured for management?
You said that you have to work within a local government infrastructure, does your IT control the Pathport Via? Do they have it secured so that only devices with certain MAC addresses are allowed to communicate with the network? In this case, a new console will not be able to communicate with the network because its MAC address is outside the table of allowed addresses.
Good luck,
John
 

danTt

Well-Known Member
I think ETC subnet is 255.255.0.0
And this works if you match the first two octets--etc lives within 10.101 if you use this subnet. It's not going to help it a guest console shows up with an IP out of this range, but that's equally true if you change to a 192.168 or 172.16 IP.

@Crisp image I'm unclear why your local IT is involved if you are on a completely independent network? it's not going to effect them any. Regardless, in almost all situations you need to be on the same subnet for communication to occur without adding advanced networking.

Alternativly, using a dumb 8 port Netgear switch will probably "just work(tm)" because it won't understand multicast and will just share data, but that's... Not recommended
 

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
@Crisp image I'm unclear why your local IT is involved if you are on a completely independent network? it's not going to effect them any. Regardless, in almost all situations you need to be on the same subnet for communication to occur without adding advanced networking.
Because it will be using cable infrastructure and we are local government. Although there is not a connection to any of their network. This is what my manager tells me.
I understand IP addressing and subnets.
Thanks for your reply.
Geoff
 

SteveB

Well-Known Member
Because it will be using cable infrastructure and we are local government. Although there is not a connection to any of their network. This is what my manager tells me.
I understand IP addressing and subnets.
Thanks for your reply.
Geoff

I would install whatever you need to get your system isolated from any other network and just dont tell IT. We installed many switches and WiFi routers for our lighting and audio systems throughout our Perf. Arts Center (5 spaces), never contacted IT. I think they had a policy that nobody was supposed to install WiFi, we ignored it and installed what we needed to make our system function. Bottom line is the lighting system has NOTHING to do with any of the regular network.
 

Crisp image

Well-Known Member
I have had the IT department walk around checking for unauthorised wifi. We were using an apple airport to control a mixer via ipad. We got a quick please explain! they did let us keep using it.
 

Jay Ashworth

Well-Known Member
Although I'm sure you wouldn't have your lighting network connected to the internet, if you do have to then don't use 2.x.x.x addresses, as they are real assigned addresses (in France, I think)
2/8 belongs to RIPE for subdelegation, but I've never seen one. :)

I had thought 2 belonged to someone Back In The Day<tm>, but the list confirms it was reserved.

 

almorton

Well-Known Member
Interesting- I've seen lists before showing that 2... have been divided up and some are in use in France.
 

TimMc

Well-Known Member
Premium Member

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