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Little Giant Ladder System

Discussion in 'Scenery, Props, and Rigging' started by CHScrew, Dec 22, 2005.

  1. CHScrew

    CHScrew Active Member

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    Have any of you ever used the "Little Giant Ladder" that they show on TV. My uncle owns a painting business and he has one. He says it is really good and worth the price. I have never seen it in-person. It looks like something that can be very usefull backstage. If any of you have used or own one... Is it worth it? Just wondering.

    Here is the site.Little Giant Ladder System



    ~Ray
     
  2. Radman

    Radman Well-Known Member

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    I've used a 20' one often, and though it is usefull, it is a pain in the rear to use. First of all it's pretty heavy, and at heights past like 12' it's a multi-person job just to set it up or move it around. It is also very loud in using, the parts all clang together and such. The legs can also get stuck or be difficult to line up the lock when changing heights. If possible I would generally prefer to use a lift, but sometimes that isn't an option, in which cases it can sometimes be the only feasible solution.
     
  3. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I agree 100% with Radman. When given the choice of one of them, a normal ladder or even a A-Frame, I choose any of the other options. The adjustable ladder can be really useful especially if working on a stair case or slope, and in one ladder it will do about anything. If you can choose only one ladder to say do a tour or install, that's probably the best ladder to choose. On the other hand, much like a multi tool knife, it's not something you want to be using all day long if assembling plugs on wire. Too combersome for this.
     
  4. erosing

    erosing The Royal Renaissance Man

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    I have one for home use, it's quite heavy, as mentioned, very loud, as mentioned as well, but I will say it is one of few ladders I've never thought I'd fall of of unless someone really tried to throw it backwards, it is VERY stable. But personally, I'd choose a lift, or an A-frame for theatre use.
     
  5. moojoe

    moojoe Active Member

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    I just have to say, Ship, that was a really good comparison of this ladder compaired to a multi tool, really is the same thing.

    I also have one at home, and i must agree with everything else, nice to have when needed, but a pain to use.
     
  6. JahJahwarrior

    JahJahwarrior Active Member

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    I used one at a youth retreat that I helped out with tech stuff on. When I showed up with the other youth they had some of it set up....didn't quite get to relax as much as I wanted and join the crowd, I did have to do all of the tech stuff.... anyways, they had a few lights and a little giant....let me mention, this was all done onthe stage--as in, we had a giant room for the retreat (a gym) but because there were only 30 of us or so, we just all gathered on the stage. Moving this little giant around onthe stage after they had set up chairs and the band was a pain!!! It looked ilke it could extend to reach higher, but it was high enough already. Looked like two people could climb it, and was a nice ladder. Heavy, hard to move around, very wide base spread, whcih was good and bad--very steady (nice for me, I'm very scared of heights) yet very hard to move around chairs (not so nice for me, I like chairs to be set up perfectly so anytime I bumped a few I'd go and reset the entire row)
     
  7. TheHeadhunter

    TheHeadhunter Member

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    We have something exactly like that but with a different name on it at school. I'll assume it's the Australian equialent. I would agree that it is very heavy and needs 2 people to manouvre. Apart from that, is locks securly into place and it is strong, stable and very versatile. Assuming you're not working on your own, it is useful thing to have around.
     
  8. wolf825

    wolf825 Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    I have used the Little Giant numerous times..from the small one they sell on TV to the 20' ones you have to special order. First I would say I like the system and the features very very much--when doing stagecraft on stairs or in odd places--its a very stable and sturdy ladder and one fo the few ladders I actually feel "safe" on at hieghts....but at times it does need more then one person to set up especially when you get into the larger frames. This ladder has its uses and applications but understand there is no one single solve-all toy for all the needs you may have. Only problems we ever had was the spring mechanism that holds the rungs in place--bit haphazard but I understand they have long since fixed that problem...and folks have already mentioned the bulky weighty issue. I would reccommend them..and while more costly then a regular ladder, they are very handy if you do stagecraft or production work.

    -w
     
  9. rambler

    rambler Member

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    I would recomend them because i have used them for a few years now in school and at a few other jobs. But i also caution about checking them regularly a very good friend of mine had one collapse out from under him puting him in the hospital and out of work for about three months with rib and arm pains. Part of the frame was cracked from being dropped out of an airplane and it just happened to fail with him on the top of it.

    But otherwise if he had looked at the ladder before getting on top he might not have gotten hurt.
     
  10. jonhirsh

    jonhirsh Active Member

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    Um if your ladder is droped from an airplane wouldnt your first thought be wow i guess i need to buy a new ladder not how can i find the old one. I think i speak for every single person on this board mabey even the world when i say. DONOT USE A LADDER IF IT HAS BEEN DROPED FROM AN AIR PLANE JUST PUT IT IN THE GARBAGE.

    how was that i think clear enough.


    JH
     
  11. CHScrew

    CHScrew Active Member

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    How high off of the ground was the airplane?
     
  12. Mayhem

    Mayhem Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    Next time I am in Chicago, you will have to show me how to use a ladder to fit plugs to wire :)
     
  13. ship

    ship Senior Team Emeritus Premium Member

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    You climb the ladder, I will be sure to show you by way of plugging it in.


    Hummmmmmmmmmm..... 120v/60Hz,.......... so that's what it's............. like.......

    Won't even charge you for the new hair doo.
     
  14. len

    len Well-Known Member

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    I use them at every show, and sometimes even prefer them to a lift. One place I work frequently the lift is so small any lighting has to be clamped on to the outside of the cage. Not something I recommend. I'd rather use a ladder.

    Yes, they're noisy to move, and the bigger ones require two people. However, I wouldn't hesitate to stand on one side while someone is on the other. They're very stable, and when I have to disconnect a 50# light at 2 AM after working 16 straight hours already, that extra comfort is worth it.

    Get the swing out platform, also. Makes it much easier to stand for long periods.
     

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