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Long throw lighting question

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by despidey, May 28, 2007.

  1. despidey

    despidey Member

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    Disclaimer: I'm an amateur and this was my first attempt a lighting - I also do audio. I work with a community theater that performs in a church that has no permanent theatrical lighting so we have to set up light trees at the back of the house which is about 90 feet to the back of the stage. We cannot install lights anywhere else other than 4-5 feet in front of the stage at a max height of 3 feet. We just finished a performance of Oliver! At the back we used two light trees each with 3 par 64s and two follow spots. In the front we used 5 Elation DLED Bricks for washes and foot lighting. We are controlling everything with a PC program called Light Factory that works pretty well.

    What can we do to improve the lighting that the par 64s give us? We have a small budget. Would some old 360Q 6X22s work? 19 degree Source 4s? The 10 degrees are very expensive and I suspect very heavy.

    Thanks
     
  2. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    I suppose it comes down to what you mean by improve the lighting. If you want to be able to isolate smaller areas on stage then switching to an ERS unit from a PAR is what you need to do. I actually am quite amazed you get any useful light out of a PAR64 at 90 foot throw, are you sure that is the floor distance?

    The 6x22 is probably the least expensive option you have, it is roughly equivalent to the 10˚ Source 4. If your floor distance is really 90 feet you may not want to go with something as wide as a 19˚ It will work for you, but even at 750w it isn't going to be you brightest tool. The new 14˚ Source 4 would be better, though the 10˚ would probably be best.
     
  3. Footer

    Footer Senior Team Senior Team Premium Member

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    The 10deg are surprising not heavy, the lense is plastic. They are expensive, but odds are you will get a better bang for your buck with the 10deg.
     
  4. stantonsound

    stantonsound Active Member

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    To be honest, the 6x22 is a great fixture. I have all source four fixtures, with the exception of a handful of the 6x22's. They will give you about the best bang for your buck. You can pick up some used ones on ebay for less than a hundred bucks, or can rent one for about $10 a week, or less. If the pattern is still too wide, you have two options. If the big factor is cost, I would recommend getting a drop in iris, determining the size of the opening of the iris to get the desired pattern, and cut some gobos that size to get the desired pattern. It sounds cheesy, but the drop in iris's are about $100 each and in a "hot" fixture like a 6x22 with a 1000watt lamp, you run the risk of burning/warping the iris. I have done this at several community theatres where there is really no budget for lighting, and it will work.

    If you have the money, by all means, go with the S4 10 degree with a drop in iris if needed. I like the S4, but for the cost difference, I would go with the 6x22.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2007
  5. Lightingguy32

    Lightingguy32 Active Member

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    You could try some 19° Source Fours with irises or you could spend about 100 dollars more per Source Four 14° Fixtures. The 10° Fixtures cost wise are only about 100 dollars off from what a 19° Source Four costs but once you throw in an iris on the 19° unit, the total cost is about the same cost as a 10° Source Four. I must caution you that the Altman 360Q 6x22 fixtures are actually heavier than the 10 degree source fours. Also the 6x22 does not have a drop in iris, you have to get it installed at the factory.
     
  6. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

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    Does anyone by chance know what type of plastic that is?
     
  7. despidey

    despidey Member

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    Yup- the distance is actually 90 feet and useful is certainly a subjective term LOL. The stage (actually church chancel) is sort of a thrust stage that's about 32 feet wide and 18 feet deep at the deepest point. The Director wanted to divide the stage in two parts, but it was impossible to have 1/2 the stage dark with the bleed over light from the pars. Light pooling is only a fantasy at this point. Given the number of scene changes required, we had to go with the two scene set-up anyhow or it would have added another 30-45 minutes to an already long show. Sorry for rambling.

    That is exactly what I want to do. Considering the photometrics and the distance, how many fixtures will I need to split the stage and/or fully illuminate for "daylight" scenes? I am guessing 2 ea for SL, SR and Center.

    Thanks
     
  8. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

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    Two units for each area is probably best. If you can, you would want to get one shooting from SL and one from SR to each area. With ERS units you will be able to shutter out of places you don't want light to go.
     

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