The above Ad will no longer appear after you Sign Up for Free!

M.V. & Flourescent Blacklights vs. Elation LED UV Fixtures

Discussion in 'Lighting and Electrics' started by jeffheart08, Dec 17, 2007.

  1. jeffheart08

    jeffheart08 Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philly
    After reading deeply into the Black Light thread and slightly frying my brain, I come back with this question.

    Has anyone used the Elation Design 36UV? I am wondering how these stack up to traditional black lights suchs as the Wildfires, Altmans, UV Cannon, UV wash, etc.... basically any black light that is not L.E.D

    AM I to understand that based on what I became overwhelemed with in the UV thread that the L.E.D black light is probably a Black Light-Blue effect as opposed to a clean true UV ouput?

    Maybe thats even gettin gtoo deep for what I really need to know. Answer if you will, but also let's just get more direct.....has anyone seen the L.E.D Blacklight in action? It has photometric data on elations site but it appears very low to me. Problem is, I am uncertain as to how the reflected light, in this case, people at a club wearing white clothing....is measured when we are talking about this spectrum of light. Does the lumens spec follow the same outlines as visible light?

    We are debating getting a bunch of UV washes or some of these Design LED 36UV's but I can't even start to consider the purchase until I know more about it and get to see it somewhere.

    The onhly UV LED's if seen have been in a small flashlight about a year ago and it didn't do squat!

    thanks in advance,
    jeff
     
  2. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    2,325
    Likes Received:
    362
    Location:
    Kilmarnock, VA
    We just put Chauvets LED Shadow UV fixture to Elations UV Wash. No comparison... UV Wash was more than twice as bright with broader coverage.

    Considering the relative cost per fixture, the UV Wash is by far the better value.
     
  3. jeffheart08

    jeffheart08 Member

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Philly

    That helps in the comparison between those two for sure but still, the problem still within is the fact that the Chavet fixture is using 1/8 or 1/4 watt led's? Doesnt say on the spec but from the looks of it, i'd guess 1/8 watt? The Elation uses 1 watt LED's. Massive difference. 3 watt (not UV though) is coming out 1st quarter this year too so I have a bit of waiting to do as I think there may be another incredible boost in output, possibly in UV versions too. Even if they do put that out though, I still want some user feedback on if 1 watt or 3 watt UV LED's are a viable replacement or competition for the FL and MV lamp standards. Since the 3 watt version is not out yet, my question still remains between the Elation UV36 and the UV Wash, as well as against the UV Cannon, and other competetive same price range models.

    However, since you have the comparison from each type of output....aside from the overall intensity, does the LED ones you have truly output UV or does it look more simply like dark blue light which isn't making anything glow but rather just blue....like a regular lamp with a blue gel on it. Are these LED's really putting off UV or just simulated?

    It is nice to hear though that you like the UV Wash overall. THey are at a good price point so it won't hurt the pocket to by a bunch. I think 6 could cover a dance floor of say 300 people wearing white, yes? I want intense coverage, not just a bit of a glow, but rather a "****!!! everybody is bright blue!" coverage. lol Or does that sound like the job for a pair of wildfires.
    I'd guesstimate the room is about 20 x 65. Lights will be hung about 10 - 15 ft high. The theme is Flourescent night so the main focus of this dance club event is UV Light.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2007
  4. gafftapegreenia

    gafftapegreenia CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,385
    Likes Received:
    527
    Occupation:
    Prop-tart
    Location:
    Chicago
    I have a side question on this one concerning blacklight blue. I was under the impression that blacklight blue acted as a filter removing the "visible" light on a source, say incandescent-halogen or fluorescent. The UV these lamps produce is a natural result, not a "simulation". It is inefficient based on the grounds that these lamps were designed to produce visible light but have been given an extremely low visible light trasmissive coating in order to let their UV through? Am I correct in this thinking?

    I'm just starting to really understand the differences, can someone elaborate?

    One cool thing about LED UV, and one thing to consider, is the on-board ability to STROBE.
     
  5. icewolf08

    icewolf08 CBMod CB Mods

    Messages:
    4,077
    Likes Received:
    682
    Occupation:
    Controls Technician - TAIT Towers
    Location:
    Lititz, PA
    Using an incandescent lamp as a blacklight is inefficient as the majority of the light emitted is in the visible spectrum. On the other hand with fluorescent lamps all you have to do is not put the phosphor coating on the inside of the tube. Fluorescent emit UV, but the phosphor coating on the tube converts that to visible light, leave out the coating you get basically pure UV radiation.

    Arc discharge lamps emit a large amount of both visible and UV light. The blacklight fixtures that use arc lamps, like many Wildfire (TM) fixtures just use a dichroic filter, often called "woods glass", that allows UV to pass, but reflects back the visible light.
     
  6. BillESC

    BillESC Well-Known Member Premium Member

    Messages:
    2,325
    Likes Received:
    362
    Location:
    Kilmarnock, VA
    Alex nailed it.

    The most efficient source for UV is fluorescent.
     
  7. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,040
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Location:
    North Wales PA
    Almost nailed it. The UV that uncoated fluorescents put out is the deadly kind! That is why they are used in germicidal units. You would never want to look at it! To produce a fluorescent backlight, the bulb is coated on the inside with a phosphor that converts that UV to a safer bandwidth UV. The bulb is then made out of Wood's glass, or has a coating filter on the outside that does the same thing. (remove most visible light.) That is why they are a bit purple. The MV blacklights usually use only the Wood's glass or outside coating. In both cases, (Flu & MV) bulbs that are made of Wood's glass are more fragile, and lamps that are outside coated are not as pure, that is why high end blacklights use an external Wood's glass filter that is separate from the lamp.
     
  8. gafftaper

    gafftaper Senior Team Senior Team Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    12,664
    Likes Received:
    2,678
    Occupation:
    Theater Manager & T.D.
    Location:
    Seattle, Washington
    I was once told that part of the reason for the purplish look to fluorescent UV lights is safety. Since true UV is invisible you can't tell if the thing is on or off. If you've ever used one of the big discharge style UV lights you see almost no difference between the light when it is on or off. So for consumer products they put a little purple in so that you know you've got the thing turned on. Probably also has to do with the quality of glass but it sounds good to say it's for safety.

    (Sort of like why they put that onion smell into natural gas.)
     
  9. JD

    JD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,040
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Location:
    North Wales PA
    Could be. Or maybe an accidental benefit! Being the nut that I am, I scraped the coating off of "outside-coated" UV bulbs in the past, and they generally have a violet/blue color to them.

    Back to the original question, here are some pros & cons:

    MV Blacklights:
    +Highest output, (with external filter-) best true UV output.
    - Long start up time, heavy.

    Fluorescent Blacklights:
    +Least expensive, fast start.
    -Long tube versions awkward, Hard to project, has purple color

    LED Blacklights
    +Light weight, long life, fast start, very efficient, the way of the future.
    -Very expensive, low output, purple/blue color, its not the future yet.
     
  10. avkid

    avkid Not a New User Fight Leukemia

    Messages:
    5,948
    Likes Received:
    225
    Occupation:
    Stageline Operator/Staging Supervisor
    Location:
    Howell, NJ
    You mean Methane?
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice